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  1. #41
    Smitty79's Avatar
    Smitty79 is offline Member
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    I guess need is meant as a way to cover all reasonable uses of a handgun. This is kind of like how many Phillips screwdrivers do you need.

    I still see:
    1 big revolver of use "in the bush".
    1 full frame semi for home defense and can be carried.
    1 smaller semi or revolver for carry under circumstances that prevent carrying a full frame
    Some kind of 22 for cheap plinking.

    Since I am not a hiker or hunter, I will stick to the bottom 3 and spend the leftover cash on a nice 12 gauge. I have rifles covered.

  2. #42
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    How Many Handguns Do You Need?

    I guess I'll answer this question the way I answer it when/if asked by my wife: at least 2 more than I have at any given time.😃

  3. #43
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    How Many Handguns Do You Need?

    Quote Originally Posted by paratrooper View Post
    I've got that list covered......several times over.
    Me too!!

  4. #44
    Tip
    Tip is online now Junior Member
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    How Many Handguns Do You Need?

    How many do I need?

    More than I have!!

  5. #45
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    How Many Handguns Do You Need?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tip View Post
    How many do I need?

    More than I have!!
    Tip, I like the way you think.

  6. #46
    JerseyJubal is offline Junior Member
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    As taught by now departed dad, an NRA instructor, Boy Scout leader, and buget conscious (but NOT cheap) fiscal Conservative no more than one handgun per family member excluding a .22 target pistol to keep practice economical should suffice. Rifles and shotguns can be chosen while considering the situations and environment ie. terrain/topography/geographical location you might face, again a .22 caliber rifle allows economical practice. In my case unless a person lives in rural N.J. where is one going to engage a "target" at 100 yds, it's densely populated even in suburban areas (should I have to face a situation while at our barrier island condo in Florida my choices will be tailored to that location).

    I'll NEVER understand those who insist on multiple handguns (revolvers/semi-autos) in a variety of calibers. There will be too much confusion in a natural disaster or SHTF scenario when selecting what to take and sorting through ammo. I think ones money will be better spent on extra recoil springs, spare cylinders, magazines, etc. and firing pins) in addition to an ample supply of a common caliber of ammuntion.

    As someone who grew up in "the city" how grateful I am to my dad for getting me involved in Scouting back in 1971 cannot be fully expressed, it allowed me to learn so much that has been helpful over the years, the time at camp on weekends, summer camp, and Waterfront then later Program Director has been invaluable. As an example during Hurricane Sandy my wife was becoming increasingly frantic each day prior to the storm due to the constant "media-hype", she seriously considered evacuating. We live in NW N.J and our home is surrounded by large oak trees (thus her concern of damage to our home or us being injured). I saw the size of the storm and asked her "where do intend to go, the whole East Cost is under threat even Pennsylvania". After much thought and some heated discussions she decided to stay put though chose to ride out the hurricane two doors over in my neighbors home where there are no trees close to the house. I stayed in our 1950's fieldstone home (with thick walls) with our dog (our neighbor and his wife have cats) but I was prepared.

    Days before the storm hit I had filled both car and Grand Cherokee plus a 6 gallon can with gas, used the extra fridge in the basement to freeze gallons of water (which we used to keep food cold once the power went out), stock up on bottled water, adding an extra 12 to make a total of 24 gallons (we're on a well), purchased extra canned goods, batteries of various sizes for the radio, flashlights & police scanner (though I always keep extras on hand), small propane cylinders/mantles for Coleman stove and lanterns. I filled all four of my 5 gallon jugs usually used for camping with water and did the same with my large pots, living on the shore of N.J.'s largest lake allowed me to use 5 gallon buckets of lake water to flush the toilet.

    As soon as the storm passed my wife came back into our home (she was gone 2 days). Though we lost power early in the storm which left us without running water, heat (oil furnace), electricity, and other amenities like TV and internet we survived. The temps plummeted but I was able to keep one room barely tolerable using the fireplace (I wish we had a wood stove & generator) with all the trees on the property we have plenty of split wood. Thanks to the frozen gallons of water we didn't lose any frozen food due to spoilage and had a hot meal (cooked on the propane stove) each night in addition to coffee and soup during the day. Being without power for six (6) days is trying, we had been through it before during the 100 year flood in 2000 when the lake rose 11 ft (we evacuated my elderly in-laws from the lakefront house below us by boat and brought them into our small home for 2 wks), severe storms and blizzards (even an F-0 tornado that swept across the lake leaving us without power for 7 days), nerves get rattled, tempers get short, and with the bone chilling cold everyone (me, my wife, and dog) is "on edge".

    The Boy Scouts and my father taught me to "Be Prepared". Keep things simple, don't overthink a possible scenario even when it comes to firearms. Stick to the basics, it'll make things much easier should you have to endure a situation like I've described above.

  7. #47
    Jonny_Cannon's Avatar
    Jonny_Cannon is offline Junior Member
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    All of them

  8. #48
    tazelmo's Avatar
    tazelmo is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigCityChief View Post
    I guess I'll answer this question the way I answer it when/if asked by my wife: at least 2 more than I have at any given time.��
    That about sums it up for me.

  9. #49
    Bisley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JerseyJubal View Post
    As taught by now departed dad, an NRA instructor, Boy Scout leader, and buget conscious (but NOT cheap) fiscal Conservative no more than one handgun per family member excluding a .22 target pistol to keep practice economical should suffice. Rifles and shotguns can be chosen while considering the situations and environment ie. terrain/topography/geographical location you might face, again a .22 caliber rifle allows economical practice. In my case unless a person lives in rural N.J. where is one going to engage a "target" at 100 yds, it's densely populated even in suburban areas (should I have to face a situation while at our barrier island condo in Florida my choices will be tailored to that location).

    I'll NEVER understand those who insist on multiple handguns (revolvers/semi-autos) in a variety of calibers. There will be too much confusion in a natural disaster or SHTF scenario when selecting what to take and sorting through ammo. I think ones money will be better spent on extra recoil springs, spare cylinders, magazines, etc. and firing pins) in addition to an ample supply of a common caliber of ammuntion.

    As someone who grew up in "the city" how grateful I am to my dad for getting me involved in Scouting back in 1971 cannot be fully expressed, it allowed me to learn so much that has been helpful over the years, the time at camp on weekends, summer camp, and Waterfront then later Program Director has been invaluable. As an example during Hurricane Sandy my wife was becoming increasingly frantic each day prior to the storm due to the constant "media-hype", she seriously considered evacuating. We live in NW N.J and our home is surrounded by large oak trees (thus her concern of damage to our home or us being injured). I saw the size of the storm and asked her "where do intend to go, the whole East Cost is under threat even Pennsylvania". After much thought and some heated discussions she decided to stay put though chose to ride out the hurricane two doors over in my neighbors home where there are no trees close to the house. I stayed in our 1950's fieldstone home (with thick walls) with our dog (our neighbor and his wife have cats) but I was prepared.

    Days before the storm hit I had filled both car and Grand Cherokee plus a 6 gallon can with gas, used the extra fridge in the basement to freeze gallons of water (which we used to keep food cold once the power went out), stock up on bottled water, adding an extra 12 to make a total of 24 gallons (we're on a well), purchased extra canned goods, batteries of various sizes for the radio, flashlights & police scanner (though I always keep extras on hand), small propane cylinders/mantles for Coleman stove and lanterns. I filled all four of my 5 gallon jugs usually used for camping with water and did the same with my large pots, living on the shore of N.J.'s largest lake allowed me to use 5 gallon buckets of lake water to flush the toilet.

    As soon as the storm passed my wife came back into our home (she was gone 2 days). Though we lost power early in the storm which left us without running water, heat (oil furnace), electricity, and other amenities like TV and internet we survived. The temps plummeted but I was able to keep one room barely tolerable using the fireplace (I wish we had a wood stove & generator) with all the trees on the property we have plenty of split wood. Thanks to the frozen gallons of water we didn't lose any frozen food due to spoilage and had a hot meal (cooked on the propane stove) each night in addition to coffee and soup during the day. Being without power for six (6) days is trying, we had been through it before during the 100 year flood in 2000 when the lake rose 11 ft (we evacuated my elderly in-laws from the lakefront house below us by boat and brought them into our small home for 2 wks), severe storms and blizzards (even an F-0 tornado that swept across the lake leaving us without power for 7 days), nerves get rattled, tempers get short, and with the bone chilling cold everyone (me, my wife, and dog) is "on edge".

    The Boy Scouts and my father taught me to "Be Prepared". Keep things simple, don't overthink a possible scenario even when it comes to firearms. Stick to the basics, it'll make things much easier should you have to endure a situation like I've described above.
    No.

  10. #50
    Bisley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Broondog View Post
    i have heard that theory before but i personally don't hold much stock in it. i'm not saying that you are wrong but in my experience it has never happened. when i first heard about the potential for bullets to "work themselves loose" i non-scientifically tested the theory by mic'ing various rounds of my own. some had been chambered, some not, and using various brands and configurations (weight and/or bullet type) that i had on hand, even my own handloads, and nothing that I measured came up out of spec.

    does that mean it can't happen? no.
    does that mean it wont happen? no again.
    does that mean i am just lucky? unknown. (i'm not really that lucky in other things )

    it just means that it hasn't yet happened to me. besides, there are other reasons to burn ammo IMO....like it's just frickin' fun!

    and i was really hoping it wasn't a shelf life issue since i have some Nazi marked 8x56 Hungarian circa 1938, and some 7.65 Argie (date unknown, probably older) that both still go bang, and accurately to boot. in fact that older mil-surp stuff is loaded WAY hotter than any current production ammo and would like to take your shoulder off. ammo well stored will outlive us all!
    I've never had it happen, either. But I have bought factory ammo that had loose bullets, from an improper crimp, and I've handloaded ammo with an improper crimp. So, no matter how much I think it probably won't happen, I find myself 'freshening' my ammo, anyway, for the weapon I'm depending on for self defense.

  11. #51
    hideit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hideit View Post
    on the humourus side
    you need 8 for the SHTF scenario
    2 for each ankle holster
    2 for left and right pocket holster
    2 for left and right belt holster
    2 for left and right shoulder holster
    that's a well armed concealed carry citizen
    2 for each ankle holster: two sig 938's in 9mm
    2 for left and right pocket holster: two S&W j frame 357mag (it can also use 38spl when the power is not needed
    2 for left and right belt holster: large frame 9mm like a beretta 92fs; and large frame 357 mag like S&W 686
    2 for left and right shoulder holster: S&W or Ruger 44MAG and a 1911 45acp
    OH and a back pack to hold the extra ammo
    and probably over the shoulders a 10/22 for small game or an AR or Shotgun 12 guage

  12. #52
    DFM914's Avatar
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    As many as I can afford!

  13. #53
    JerseyJubal is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bisley View Post
    No.


    You say "No", why? What is your reasoning?

    Being someone knew to handgun ownership I'd like to know just what your views are. My experience is mostly with long-guns, an Enfield .303, 12 gauge, and .22 bolt action rifle with seven round magazine.

    As stated in my rather long post in this thread I'm of the belief that staying at home where surrounding are familiar. Preparing to "bug-out" whether due to natural disasters or SHTF scenario ie. gathering important documents, Rx's, jewelry, dog food, firearms, ammo, food, water, lanterns, camp stove, etc. one can find themselves having MORE to pack than there is room in the vehicles.

  14. #54
    Desertrat's Avatar
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    My choices:
    22 Revolver
    9mm for defense, night stand/carry
    44 Mag for hunting, and general field protection
    .44 Special (same as above, but easier to carry and on the wrist)

  15. #55
    floridaowner is offline Junior Member
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    I think one to match each shirt would be good.

  16. #56
    Ricky59's Avatar
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    Carrying ..
    Kahr PM9 & Kahr P380

    Home defense gun..Glock 19

    History ..1911 kimber pro raptor

  17. #57
    tony pasley's Avatar
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    Need, the one I am carring, want at least the next one I buy. How many a person has it is up to the person and no one else.

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