Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 40
  1. #1
    bojasmi is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    2

    Accidental Discharge

    Hello to everyone, would appreciate any thoughs, please no degrading remarks I feel bad enough as it is. I am a long time gun owner without any close calls and have actually prevented two AD's from happening by other individuals. I had two semi automatic pistols loaded not chambered and locked away in a safe. Tonight I decided to unload them to lessen the tension on the clip spring as I had not fire them in a while. First let me say, everyone that knows me understands that I am extremely repetitive in safely handing a firearm in some cases have been laugh at about how I'm never satisfied that a gun is empty. The last thing I do before putting a semi auto away is to put back on the slide, make sure its empty, then dry fire. I am very religious about this and feel comfortable in knowing my stored firearms are empty. With that being said, I unloaded the double action 45 cal. semi auto pistol with a safety without a problem. The other is a S&W 40 Cal. Glock Copy, I removed it from the safe ejected and emptied the clip then went to moved the slide back to check the chamber but before I could the gun went off. There are two things that are bothering me, one that I must of stored a gun loaded and two that I did not considered it to be loaded having my finger on the trigger. Even though I had the gun pointed in a safe direction this does not make up for the stupid mistake I made. I am thinking of selling my semi automatics as I have lost a great deal confidence in myself. I guess the purpose of this thread is that you never can be too cautious when it comes to firearms. I cannot believe this happen to me and I am very lucky that no one was hurt. In closing I just wish to say it wasn't the guns fault it did what it is suppose to do.

  2. #2
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    751
    Very honest take on what happened. Thank you for it, you kind of "woke me up" or gave me a refresher, i think accidents happen and congrats that you are able to learn from this!

    Good luck and be safe dude!

  3. #3
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,546
    Accidents happen.

    Yes, it was a case of negligence. But you're not the only person who has experienced this sort of discharge.
    Besides, you were careful enough to have the gun pointed in a harmless direction, so no real injury was done to anything but your ego.

    I have caused two negligent discharges in my life. One was dangerously close to being harmful, and the other was completely benign.
    I learned important concepts from both accidents, not least of which was to always point any gun, always as if it were loaded, in a safe direction.

    We are supposed to learn from our missteps. If you have learnt something from your harmless negligent discharge, you are ahead of the game.

  4. #4
    qwiksdraw's Avatar
    qwiksdraw is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    112
    Before your accident you were "cocky" enough to think that if you did certain things you will never have a negligent discharge with your guns. Now you can go on with CONFIDENCE that if you don't do certain things then bad things can happen.

    The only mistake you can make in life is not learning from your mistakes.

    Don't sell your guns, enjoy them....with your newly acquired confidence.

  5. #5
    recoilguy's Avatar
    recoilguy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    1,311
    If your finger was on the trigger and you did not have nay intention of shooting it you need to practice your saftey routine a little bit more carefully and more often so it becomes second nature to you to do it correctly.

    If you are not confident in your ability to handle the guns safely.......get rid of them. If you can use this experiance to be a better gun hamdler then keep them and enjoy them.

    My neighbor has a poster on his gun safe that says "if your guns scare you.....you scare me.

    RCG

  6. #6
    Bisley's Avatar
    Bisley is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    1,499
    You have beaten yourself up about this mistake, properly, I think.

    Now you can move on and not repeat that very serious mistake again. The positive lesson learned is that you obeyed the first and most important rule and nobody was harmed.

  7. #7
    Leo's Avatar
    Leo
    Leo is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    113
    We're glad that you're unharmed. We need to keep the finger off the trigger unless we intend to shoot the gun and we must treat all guns as loaded.

  8. #8
    rex
    rex is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    1,301
    At least you had the presence of mind to have it pointed in a safe direction,that was good.We learn from our mistakes.

    I've had 2 NDs in my life,technically.The first I was function checking my 45 after a trigger job and when I loaded it went right through the previous moves,boom in the wall.Surprizingly it wasn't that loud,because my hearing shut down for 5 minutes.

    The second one is technically an ND,I was running a string of IPSC targets and got on the trigger a little quick.Hit the edge of the target and just missed the scoring ring.

    Be safe.

  9. #9
    Packard is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Posts
    1,017
    I have a rule that states: All guns are loaded at all time (even when I am certain that they are empty). The only "unloaded" guns are revolvers with the cylinder swung open and an auto with the slide locked back.

    I have two Glocks and I always wince when I have to pull the trigger to disassemble the guns--even though I know it is empty. (I always point it in a safe direction anyhow.)

    I have a friend who has a similar rule. He says, "As soon as an 'empty' gun leaves my hands I assume it is loaded". For him, if he emptied a gun and put it on the table, when he picked it up again he would check to make sure it was still empty.

    The point is to have a rule to live by; and then always live by that rule.

    In my opinion your only problem is that you never established a fixed rule in your head--and this is the fault of whoever taught you to shoot. Rectify this oversight and you are good to own autos.

    So find a rule that works for you. Then always follow that rule. (And keep your guns. An accident like this, unless it was from senility or some other disability, tends to keep you much more careful in the future.)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    101
    you made a mistake, you learned from it and no one got hurt. I had one in my 40 years of gun handling and wasn't a proud moment

  11. #11
    denner's Avatar
    denner is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    2,084
    I've had a couple and they are no fun. Fortunately or by the grace of God I didn't kill or injure myself or someone else. That being said, no matter how well trained, or how many rules, or how safe we are; we are all still humans susceptible to mistake and guns are not forgiving.
    Last edited by denner; 12-12-2012 at 04:34 PM.

  12. #12
    rolandrock is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    NE Florida
    Posts
    25
    of the guys I know that are the real gun nerds..you know, the IPSC USPSA, 50k rounds a year, handle guns all day every day guys...every one of them, myself included, has had at least one unintentional discharge. "Accidental" is the result of parts failure.

    It happens. That's why you keep multiple layers of safety. Just because you are absolutly, positivly certain it's unloaded doesn't mean it ok to use the cat for a dry fire target.

    as long as you keep up the multiple layers of safety, all you'll get is dook scared and embarrassed.
    nothing will improve your gun handling skills like a UD will.

  13. #13
    TOF's Avatar
    TOF
    TOF is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northern Arizona
    Posts
    3,015
    It was not accidental. It was a negligent discharge.
    Yes many of us have experienced similar through our own negligance but we should not lable it accidental.

  14. #14
    bojasmi is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    2

    I agree

    Quote Originally Posted by TOF View Post
    It was not accidental. It was a negligent discharge.
    Yes many of us have experienced similar through our own negligance but we should not lable it accidental.
    I agree and am sorry that I misquoted the incident. It was a ND not an AD and I apologize for the mislabeling.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    101
    Quote Originally Posted by TOF View Post
    It was not accidental. It was a negligent discharge.
    Yes many of us have experienced similar through our own negligance but we should not lable it accidental.
    When you didn't mean to do it then it's an accident and can be sued for it if warranted. By calling it an accident it is not a willful tort thus the insurance co will pay off on damages. When you’re in the military or a LEO then it's a negative discharge because people with extensive training are supposed to know better and it is a punishable incident

  16. #16
    kerrycork is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    new london county, connecticut.
    Posts
    70
    Quote Originally Posted by bojasmi View Post
    Hello to everyone, would appreciate any thoughs, please no degrading remarks I feel bad enough as it is. I am a long time gun owner without any close calls and have actually prevented two AD's from happening by other individuals. I had two semi automatic pistols loaded not chambered and locked away in a safe. Tonight I decided to unload them to lessen the tension on the clip spring as I had not fire them in a while. First let me say, everyone that knows me understands that I am extremely repetitive in safely handing a firearm in some cases have been laugh at about how I'm never satisfied that a gun is empty. The last thing I do before putting a semi auto away is to put back on the slide, make sure its empty, then dry fire. I am very religious about this and feel comfortable in knowing my stored firearms are empty. With that being said, I unloaded the double action 45 cal. semi auto pistol with a safety without a problem. The other is a S&W 40 Cal. Glock Copy, I removed it from the safe ejected and emptied the clip then went to moved the slide back to check the chamber but before I could the gun went off. There are two things that are bothering me, one that I must of stored a gun loaded and two that I did not considered it to be loaded having my finger on the trigger. Even though I had the gun pointed in a safe direction this does not make up for the stupid mistake I made. I am thinking of selling my semi automatics as I have lost a great deal confidence in myself. I guess the purpose of this thread is that you never can be too cautious when it comes to firearms. I cannot believe this happen to me and I am very lucky that no one was hurt. In closing I just wish to say it wasn't the guns fault it did what it is suppose to do.
    This reminds me of myself many years ago . The biggest hurt was my ego , the good part is I still remember it and there was no injuries and it made me a little more aware of the possibilities where guns are involved. I learned a lesson that time and have not forgotten it. Don't be too hard on yourself because you like me won't forget the lesson learned here. Good luck.

  17. #17
    uspastime's Avatar
    uspastime is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NORTHERN California
    Posts
    15
    What is amazing to me (or shocking...I still haven't decided) was how many of you have had similar stories to tell of AD/ND. This is a good thing, meaning, one can never, ever,ever be too careful and the fact that there are so many occurrences is proof of that.
    I myself have never had one but on more than one occasion was split seconds away from something that could have been a real disaster. In those cases, I was either lucky or double checked my firearm before holstering a loaded gun without decocking (SIG) it.
    It's so easy to be complacent when you feel your routine is thorough, almost thoughtless in a way because it's such a routine.
    The bottom line: PAY ATTENTION. Each and every step. I know I will from now on.
    Thanks to all of you guys who put your egos aside to admit you're human!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Chino Valley, AZ
    Posts
    519
    I'm seventy years old. I've "owned" firearms since age six.
    And actually bought and owned them since age fourteen.

    I had a N.D. three years ago. With a S&W J-frame REVOLVER.
    While I was sitting at my computer desk. HOW can that happen ?

    I was lucky I obeyed the "never point unless" rule.

    The metal window-frame deformed "self-defense" bullet sits on my desk as a reminder.
    Yes, I actually pointed at the metal frame for "dry-fire". The other four were standing on my desk.
    Along with one of maroon snap-caps. Can't get any dumber than that. "Keep live ammo in another room".

    In other news: People can be divided into two groups in several "areas".

    1. Those who have had a hard-drive failure, and those who WILL have a hard-drive failure.

    2. Those who have had a wheels-up landing, and those who WILL have a wheels-up landing.

    3. And, of course, those who have had a ND, and those who WILL . . .

    I'm still doing OK with "will have" on item two.

  19. #19
    rex
    rex is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    1,301
    There are more scenarios to that,but if that ain't the friggin' truth.I always said you didn't do it long enough or you fibbed.

  20. #20
    jhc37013 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    5
    Hello and on my first post I want to own up to being guilty of a ND once while taking field stripping a Glock 23, thankfully I had it pointed in a safe direction. I had handled handguns for nearly 20 years before that happened and even though I was always careful I was a little cocky and thought I would never let that happen, well let me tell you just like you OP I was completely humbled.

    Now days before I do any cleaning or dry firing of a weapon I check, re-check and triple check the pistol clear and I take my sweet time doing so. I was always conscious of safety but after my ND I have taken clearing a weapon to a whole new level and because me or no one else was injured I'm actually glad it happened, I'm better for it and it sounds like you will be as well.

    What you did sucks but it's obvious from your post your a responsible gun owner and that you have put a lot of thought into what happened, I think just like when it happened to me you have been humbled and maybe added a new level of respect to safety so I think now would be the worse time to sell or trade your semi's.

    Just work through it and get your confidence back but always remember what happened, I would suggest getting back on the horse right away by going to the range and then come home and break down your guns and clean them.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

.380 acp wound
,

accidental discharge

,
accidental discharge of a firearm law washington
,
accidental discharge of a gun in a case
,
accidental discharges with handguns
,
accidental firearmdischarges in 2012
,

handgun accidental discharge

,

indiana accidental discharge

,

is accidental dischage indiana

,
oklahoma law unintentional discharge
,

pistol accidental discharge

,
why is an accidental discharge unintentional?
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1