Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 40 of 40
  1. #21
    hof8231 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    48
    I have a confession to make as well, and you all will probably judge me for it but whatever. One night this past year, I was at a college party at my good friend's house. We were drinking and having a good time and then suddenly things went south. My friend had some depression problems back then and started acting really weird and reckless, talking about "ending it" so I took it upon myself to get his 1911 he keeps cocked and locked in his drawer and empty it. In my haste to empty the gun and hide it before he came upstairs and noticed, I emptied the chamber THEN dropped the mag...which, as you all know, means there's still one in the chamber. I pointed it at the outside wall and went to dry fire to drop the hammer. BANG. Thankfully nobody was hurt. I have three handguns of my own and ever since then, I'll randomly think of that moment and get really nervous. I think "what if I was an idiot and pointed it at myself when I dry fired?" Now to clarify, I know to NEVER do that, but I just keep thinking "what if I did?" I might not be here anymore. I'm safe as possible with handguns. I check the chamber several times during cleaning, I've never pointed the gun at something I didn't intend to shoot, and I always keep them locked up in a safe. The whole thing with me was how sobering the situation was. It only takes one bad screw up to potentially ruin a life. I like to think that my experience made me for conscious of being absolutely 100% safe, but I'd be lying if I said it still doesn't eat at me sometimes and make me a little nervous.

  2. #22
    Tip
    Tip is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    76

    Re: Accidental Discharge

    Several things come to mind here:
    1. You were being pro-active in, perhaps, preventing a bad situation. KUDOS
    2. Alcohol and firearms. BAD
    3. You followed your training -- treat every weapon as if it was loaded. Never point a loaded weapon at anything you don't intend to shoot. Always keep the weapons pointed in a safe direction. KUDOS
    4. Noun properly clearing the weapon because you were impaired by alcohol -- see number 2 above. BAD

    For the most part you possibly averted a couple of tragedies because of training, however lack of adherence to training gave life to another potential tragedy. Once having lived through this I seriously doubt you'll do it again. LEARN from it, SHARE it and help others learn from it.

  3. #23
    hof8231 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    48
    I understand completely how idiotic it was and I don't expect anyone to be understanding because I broke one of the most important rules of gun safety. Don't mix alcohol and firearms. My intentions were there I guess but that doesn't make it any better. Honestly, it makes me so angry at myself that I did that. Seriously, who the hell touches a loaded gun when they've been drinking? I never thought I'd be that guy because my dad taught me better than that and I haven't been since, so I guess you could say I learned from it, although I shouldn't have had to learn from it because I shouldn't have been that dumb to begin with. I will say, though, that having a negligent discharge, especially one in the circumstances that I had one, makes you respect gun safety more and respect the power of firearms as a whole a lot more. Be as safe as possible. Guns don't care if you mean to discharge.

    Live and learn, I suppose.

  4. #24
    jhc37013 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by hof8231 View Post
    I understand completely how idiotic it was and I don't expect anyone to be understanding because I broke one of the most important rules of gun safety. Don't mix alcohol and firearms. My intentions were there I guess but that doesn't make it any better. Honestly, it makes me so angry at myself that I did that. Seriously, who the hell touches a loaded gun when they've been drinking? I never thought I'd be that guy because my dad taught me better than that and I haven't been since, so I guess you could say I learned from it, although I shouldn't have had to learn from it because I shouldn't have been that dumb to begin with. I will say, though, that having a negligent discharge, especially one in the circumstances that I had one, makes you respect gun safety more and respect the power of firearms as a whole a lot more. Be as safe as possible. Guns don't care if you mean to discharge.

    Live and learn, I suppose.
    Absolutely like I was saying because of my AD I now basically have OCD when it comes to checking the gun clear of live ammo, that is not a bad thing just the opposite and hopefully others will read this and maybe pause an extra tick for safety.

    If your reading this and never had a AD then great but believe us when we say it is very scary no matter how much of your life you have lived around guns. Because of my AD I'm a better weapons handler and I hopefully it rubs off on the people I shoot with or handle guns around.

  5. #25
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    403
    Glad you didn't get hurt. Lessons learned at the school of hard knocks leave a lasting impression.

    For what it's worth, you can leave your magazines loaded. Static load will NOT damage your springs.... springs get weaker due to cycling, and use, physical damage, or poor manufacturing processes.

    Regards

  6. #26
    dondavis3's Avatar
    dondavis3 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Dallas / Fort Worth Texas Area
    Posts
    1,871
    I'm ashamed to say I've done it - once.

    If you handle guns a lot - it may happen.

    I just stay cognisant of the danger.

    I'm more safe now than ever ... as one gets older ... you need to be safety aware IMHO

    Remember "the most shot thing in the world are TV's"


  7. #27
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    403
    I've been safely handling firearms since 1955. Last year, an LEO friend of mine and I were looking at some of my handguns. I was in the process of unloading one of them... gun pointed in a safe direction, finger off the trigger, dropped the magazine, went to rack the slide, and for whatever reason, lost control of the gun. It was a DA/SA striker-fired gun, so the short slide movement cocked it. I foolishly reacted by trying to catch the gun... instinct, I guess. I ended up with a 9mm entry and exit wound in my left hand, at point blank range. NO excuses, and yes, I learned from it, and yes, I was lucky. I post this only in the hope that it may save others from similar or worse injuries.

    I have two pics of the results... Number 1 is a poor quality, cell phone pic at the hospital... number 2 was taken one month later.

    I'll just post links to the pics as the first one is somewhat graphic

    1. http://personal.swayzee.com/jayb/wound.jpg

    2. http://personal.swayzee.com/jayb/wound2.jpg

    Be safe.....

  8. #28
    acepilot's Avatar
    acepilot is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    185
    As a pilot, I wonder if this might have been caused by something that pilots can experience. COMPLACENCY! Pilots do many repetitive things so often, that it becomes almost second nature and they can do it without really thinking about it too much. That can lead to missing a single, vital step of a process. Pilots have "compensated" for this by making written checklists, for example, a checklist for takeoff procedures, landing procedures, emergency procedures, etc. for each specific aircraft type they fly. While it may sound silly to have a written checklist for unloading your guns, it does force you to complete each step in proper order.

    Glad nobody was hurt!! I'd say, get up, dust off, and get back on that horse. You wouldn't sell your car over a fender bender would you? You don't quit walking after you slip and fall on some ice. Hang in there and regroup.

  9. #29
    denner's Avatar
    denner is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,920
    Quote Originally Posted by usmcj View Post
    I've been safely handling firearms since 1955. Last year, an LEO friend of mine and I were looking at some of my handguns. I was in the process of unloading one of them... gun pointed in a safe direction, finger off the trigger, dropped the magazine, went to rack the slide, and for whatever reason, lost control of the gun. It was a DA/SA striker-fired gun, so the short slide movement cocked it. I foolishly reacted by trying to catch the gun... instinct, I guess. I ended up with a 9mm entry and exit wound in my left hand, at point blank range. NO excuses, and yes, I learned from it, and yes, I was lucky. I post this only in the hope that it may save others from similar or worse injuries.

    I have two pics of the results... Number 1 is a poor quality, cell phone pic at the hospital... number 2 was taken one month later.

    I'll just post links to the pics as the first one is somewhat graphic

    1. http://personal.swayzee.com/jayb/wound.jpg

    2. http://personal.swayzee.com/jayb/wound2.jpg

    Be safe.....
    Wow, thanks for posting USMCJ, that woke me up. Looks like they did a remarkable job fixing it, also looks like you healed remarkably, guess thankfully it didn't hit anything major in the hand. Looks definately like a SD hollow point wound.
    Last edited by denner; 12-25-2012 at 02:20 PM.

  10. #30
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    403
    The round was a 9mm Federal Hydro-shok. Nothing major, and no function shortcomings. I was extremely fortunate.

  11. #31
    quaze is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1
    Same thing happened to me, but it went through the well and in the neighbors house! Police still handling the issue and confiscated the 1911. Feel very ashamed and like you I feel like selling the semi automatics because after that I just don't want to take a risk like that again.

  12. #32
    guardrail's Avatar
    guardrail is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    71

    Re: Accidental Discharge

    Why does everyone feel the need to dry fire? When I head out for work I drop the mag and remove the one in the pipe. The weapon is then placed in the box in a hidden compartment. The wife sometimes drives the vehicle without me so I unload it to alleviate any hassle if she gets stopped. I never dry fire the weapon.

    Is there a reason to dry fire it?

  13. #33
    jm38 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by bojasmi View Post
    Hello to everyone, would appreciate any thoughs, please no degrading remarks I feel bad enough as it is. I am a long time gun owner without any close calls and have actually prevented two AD's from happening by other individuals. I had two semi automatic pistols loaded not chambered and locked away in a safe. Tonight I decided to unload them to lessen the tension on the clip spring as I had not fire them in a while. First let me say, everyone that knows me understands that I am extremely repetitive in safely handing a firearm in some cases have been laugh at about how I'm never satisfied that a gun is empty. The last thing I do before putting a semi auto away is to put back on the slide, make sure its empty, then dry fire. I am very religious about this and feel comfortable in knowing my stored firearms are empty. With that being said, I unloaded the double action 45 cal. semi auto pistol with a safety without a problem. The other is a S&W 40 Cal. Glock Copy, I removed it from the safe ejected and emptied the clip then went to moved the slide back to check the chamber but before I could the gun went off. There are two things that are bothering me, one that I must of stored a gun loaded and two that I did not considered it to be loaded having my finger on the trigger. Even though I had the gun pointed in a safe direction this does not make up for the stupid mistake I made. I am thinking of selling my semi automatics as I have lost a great deal confidence in myself. I guess the purpose of this thread is that you never can be too cautious when it comes to firearms. I cannot believe this happen to me and I am very lucky that no one was hurt. In closing I just wish to say it wasn't the guns fault it did what it is suppose to do.
    Heck... I've shot my bench twice...due to interference in the repair/cleaning process (wife) I suppose I'm not as young as I used to be. As long as you didn't hurt yourself or anything of value just learn from it.

  14. #34
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,201
    Quote Originally Posted by guardrail View Post
    Why does everyone feel the need to dry fire? When I head out for work I drop the mag and remove the one in the pipe. The weapon is then placed in the box in a hidden compartment. The wife sometimes drives the vehicle without me so I unload it to alleviate any hassle if she gets stopped. I never dry fire the weapon.

    Is there a reason to dry fire it?
    Well, no, there's no reason to dry-fire your pistol...unless you want to become a better shot than you are, that is.
    Dry-fire practice is the best way to achieve superior trigger control, and superior trigger control results in superior accuracy.
    The problem here is inattention and brain-, not dry-fire practice itself.
    The problem in absolutely all negligent-discharge episodes always boils down to inattention and brain-.


    Quote Originally Posted by quaze View Post
    Same thing happened to me, but it went through the well and in the neighbors house! Police still handling the issue and confiscated the 1911. Feel very ashamed and like you I feel like selling the semi automatics because after that I just don't want to take a risk like that again.
    Yeah. Obviously, it was all the semi-automatic pistol's fault.
    It couldn't possibly have been you.

  15. #35
    Skarrde is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    17

    Re: Accidental Discharge

    Some feel the need to dry fire because they are used to dropping the hammer. Not everyone is used to the "new" guns that don't have the decocker or don't need to be decocked like a striker fire.

    As to your second part I don't think he is blaming the gun but rather himself and instead of worrying about it he would rather remove the tool.

  16. #36
    plp
    plp is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    61
    Rookie question because I know bupkis about Glocks, but can't you just rack the slide to clear the round in the chamber? I do it with all my semi-autos, drop the mag and rack the slide, one of my many OCD habits with firearms. I don't store any weapons loaded other than my immediate ccw which is under my control, but still check them when I take them out, even when loading. I want to be pointed downrange or grounded when I cycle the slide to load the weapon.

    In spite of all these safeguards, I fully expect a visit from the screwup fairy any time. I've paid stupid tax in pretty much every other aspect of my life, no reason to believe firearms are any different.

  17. #37
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,201
    Quote Originally Posted by Skarrde View Post
    Some feel the need to dry fire because they are used to dropping the hammer. Not everyone is used to the "new" guns that don't have the decocker or don't need to be decocked like a striker fire...
    The only proper ways to absolutely prove that the chamber of a gun is empty is to either leave the slide retracted and locked back, or to drop the hammer on an empty chamber. Using the decocker proves nothing, and, thus, is unsafe.
    If the striker remains cocked, and the slide is closed, how do you know that the chamber is empty?
    And, yes, I know that all guns are to be treated as if they were loaded. But I also want to protect against a negligent discharge by some snoop who doesn't know what he is doing, or an uneducated child. I want to know absolutely that the gun is absolutely empty when I put it away.


    Quote Originally Posted by Skarrde View Post
    As to your second part I don't think he is blaming the gun but rather himself and instead of worrying about it he would rather remove the tool. [emphasis added]
    ...And, exactly, how is that not blaming the tool?
    Please explain.

  18. #38
    paratrooper is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,315
    I sure don't want this taken the wrong way, and I hope it's accepted in the spirit in which it's said.

    I've been around firearms since age 8 or so. I served in the military and in LE for over 30 yrs. I've paid due diligence when around firearms at all times.

    Having said the above, I've never had a accidental or negligent discharge of any kind.

    I made this statement to more or less prove that it can be done. And yes, I have a lot of years ahead of me still, but the game plan isn't going to change.

  19. #39
    momtotwo is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    168
    My dad shot a hole in the middle of the dinning room table one time...
    Another time, he shot a hole in the door frame of the shop.

    Crap happens.

    You learn to be safer. Nobody got hurt! I am sorry that you had this happen but it will happen to most of us sooner or later. We all just hope that it ends with a laugh and not a cry.

  20. #40
    pic's Avatar
    pic
    pic is offline Senior Member HGF Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Upstate,N.Y.
    Posts
    1,372
    Quote Originally Posted by guardrail View Post
    Why does everyone feel the need to dry fire? When I head out for work I drop the mag and remove the one in the pipe. The weapon is then placed in the box in a hidden compartment. The wife sometimes drives the vehicle without me so I unload it to alleviate any hassle if she gets stopped. I never dry fire the weapon.

    Is there a reason to dry fire it?
    I will dry fire my glock when i don't want a round in the chamber. I like to keep the tension off the firing pin spring when a round is not chambered. I think striker fired guns do not usually have decockers. When cleaning and racking the slide , I think dry firing is the only way to uncock internal firing pin.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

accidental discharge

,
accidental discharge of a firearm law in tx
,
accidental discharges 2012
,
accidental firearm discharge in indiana
,
accidental gun discharges in 2012
,
dry firing my gun then negligent discharge
,
gun accident discharge tx feb 2014
,

handgun accidental discharge

,

indiana accidental discharge

,

is accidental dischage indiana

,

pistol accidental discharge

,
taurus judge accidental discharge
Click on a term to search for related topics.