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  1. #1
    TheLAGuy is offline Banned
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    First hand gun purchase with extra safety? GLock compared to others out there.

    I know I've kinda touched on this subject on a few other of my posts but I'm coming down to the wire here with my purchase.

    I've taken a 4 hours basic hand gun class a few weeks ago so I know the general safety rules.

    However, would it be better for me to get a gun with more safeties as my first gun, rather than a glock? Which has minimal safeties?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    swany66675's Avatar
    swany66675 is offline Junior Member
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    Re: First hand gun purchase with extra safety? GLock compared to others out there.

    In your class what type of gun did you use, did you feel comfortable with it, if you used more then one gun which one felt the best? It is a very personal choice based on your comfort level I like safety's on things I use for hunting. For self defense type gun I would never have one, but if there's a gun you like its yours train with it take classes become proficient with it and be happy.

  3. #3
    denner's Avatar
    denner is online now Senior Member
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    Buy the glock and get it over with. Glock's are fantastic firearms which are as safe as it's owner, thousands and thousands are carried by law enforcement every day. Generally they are easier to shoot as compared to a DA/SA unless you put some time in with the DA. Get in the habit of doing breech checks, knowing when the trigger is forward it is cocked and carry it or store it in a good kydex holster and you should be good to go.

  4. #4
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
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    I definitely think Glock is the best option but if you get it, just remember the grip angle is different then say a 1911 so make sure that you like how it points. Otherwise you would wanna go with a Springfield XDm or a M&P. I think the glock grip angle makes it very point-able but some of my buddies can't hit anything with them because they like the 1911 style grip angle.

    Even people who hate Glocks sometimes end up owning one, the sheer fact that they are so damn reliable and it is so easy to find parts, accessories, holsters, books, etc. all made for the glock.

  5. #5
    swany66675's Avatar
    swany66675 is offline Junior Member
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    Re: First hand gun purchase with extra safety? GLock compared to others out there.

    I don't shoot a glock well, do like the xd/Xdm and the m&ps I just like most striker fired guns. Love the looks of a 1911 though.

  6. #6
    goNYG's Avatar
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    IMO...YES, most definitely you need mechanical safety features. Unless you have LE or military training or will engage in extensive training at your own initiative, I put you in my category - self-taught. Given that you will be the self-taught category, you should have at least one, perhaps multiple, active safety features on you first handgun. The ultimate safety feature is, of course, the grey matter between your ears, but unless that is trained up, safety will not be ingrained and you will not instinctively and habitually apply non-mechanical safety techniques. You will, in time, as you learn them, but in the interim, you need the supplement of mechanical safety features.

    I decided maximum mechanical safety features were best for me as a self-taught shooter. I have a FNX-9 and HK P30S, both of which have manual safety and decocker. I have a CZ-75 SP-01 with a manual safety, but which also comes in a decocker model instead. Obviously, 1911s have safeties. There is plenty out there to choose from. At the risk of violating the Primacy of Subjectivity (i.e. it's a matter of personal preference) when it comes to all things firearms...I strongly discourage you from getting a Glock as your first handgun and opt for mechanical safety features.

  7. #7
    swany66675's Avatar
    swany66675 is offline Junior Member
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    Re: First hand gun purchase with extra safety? GLock compared to others out there.

    All guns are loaded unless you do a physical check of the firearm at that time. Walk out of the room the gun needs to be checked again when you walk back in. Modern guns will not go bang unless you touch the trigger if you do not touch the trigger untill you are ready to shoot it won't suprise you. As you draw a firearm keep your finger outside of the trigger guard until the gun comes on target at that time place finger inside of trigger guard. It is that persons opinion on a safety and it may work for him, but a safety can fail, a loaded chamber indicater can fail, learning how to safely handle a firearm will never fail. Time and practice that's it, a safety without practice is a crutch, it allows people to lean on something that may fail. I've seen people put there finger on a trigger because the safety is on and its safe (flawed logic). Sorry for the rant, buy what makes you happy, safety or no safety its the same comes down to you learning to be safe with it.

  8. #8
    Shinytop is offline Junior Member
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    I first fired a handgun in 1967. Fired various military firearms until my retirement in 1994. This year I bought my first handgun and I chose a Glock. A fine weapon and accurate. But after over a 1000 rounds I still had not gotten comfortable with leaving it with a round in the chamber. So I have it up for sale and went looking for a hammer fired gun with a safety and decocker. I settled on a Beretta Storm Compact, a gun that is accurate, easy to maintain and feels less like a brick in my hand. H&K and Sig almost make fine hammer fired guns.

  9. #9
    swany66675's Avatar
    swany66675 is offline Junior Member
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    Re: First hand gun purchase with extra safety? GLock compared to others out there.

    12 years 1 in the chamber daily carry no accidents. Really there in no wrong choice, its what you prefer. A safety can accidently be disengaged but safe handling makes the difference, have friend that carries a 1911 more once his safety has been bumped off on a seat belt. He just reaches down and kicks it back on.

  10. #10
    jakeleinen1 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by goNYG View Post
    IMO...YES, most definitely you need mechanical safety features. Unless you have LE or military training or will engage in extensive training at your own initiative, I put you in my category - self-taught. Given that you will be the self-taught category, you should have at least one, perhaps multiple, active safety features on you first handgun. The ultimate safety feature is, of course, the grey matter between your ears, but unless that is trained up, safety will not be ingrained and you will not instinctively and habitually apply non-mechanical safety techniques. You will, in time, as you learn them, but in the interim, you need the supplement of mechanical safety features.

    I decided maximum mechanical safety features were best for me as a self-taught shooter. I have a FNX-9 and HK P30S, both of which have manual safety and decocker. I have a CZ-75 SP-01 with a manual safety, but which also comes in a decocker model instead. Obviously, 1911s have safeties. There is plenty out there to choose from. At the risk of violating the Primacy of Subjectivity (i.e. it's a matter of personal preference) when it comes to all things firearms...I strongly discourage you from getting a Glock as your first handgun and opt for mechanical safety features.
    Interesting perspective, but highly flawed. No safety is necessary ever, and anybody incompetent enough to NEED a safety shouldn't own a handgun or any firearm for that matter in the first place. Many people have had Glocks or other firearms without safties as their firsts and got along fine.

    But I respect your opinion on the matter

  11. #11
    SouthernBoy's Avatar
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    One of the last things I want in my way if I have to get my sidearm into action, is a manually operated external safety. There is going to be enough going on and I just don't want or need to throw anything else into the equation. That's how I train and that's how I carry.

    However, this choice is a very personal one and should be taken by the individual with much consideration and without interference from others. It is what YOU deem to be best for your specific needs that counts. I know people who have jumped right in and purchased Glocks as their first handguns, and have done remarkably well with them. I shoot on a regular basis with one such person and he is good. So it really is a personal decision to take.

  12. #12
    goNYG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakeleinen1 View Post
    Interesting perspective, but highly flawed. No safety is necessary ever, and anybody incompetent enough to NEED a safety shouldn't own a handgun or any firearm for that matter in the first place. Many people have had Glocks or other firearms without safties as their firsts and got along fine.

    But I respect your opinion on the matter
    And I respect yours. So, true and I agree. But there are degrees. This is more true under ideal conditions. No one NEEDS a safety and incompetence is not at issue. Shooters can - and I did - value mechanical safety features overlaying proper training and a commitment to safe handling. Mechanical safety features also don't limit your options because they exist. I can carry my FNX cocked and locked, decocked, or condition zero if I so choose.

    So sure, Glocks are fine as a first handgun, but there is plenty for a self-taught newbie to VALUE (not need) in one or more mechanical safety features w/o necessary giving up much. You can always sell the damn thing and by all the glocks you want after you are a confident, no safety-needing whiz kid.

  13. #13
    usmcj's Avatar
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    The best safety is between your ears. Safety's, or the lack of safety's, should NOT be a primary consideration.

    Would you buy a pair of shoes that may not fit right, but have an "anti-fall" safety built in, or buy a pair of shoes that feel comfortable enough so that you can learn to walk safely in them?

    I don't care of a gun comes with an accessory box full of safety's. if the gun isn't comfortable to you, and if the gun doesn't "fit your hand", I think it doubtful that you will ever shoot it enough to become proficient with it.

  14. #14
    shamrock62 is offline Junior Member
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    As one member stated the gun is as safe as the owner. It depends on how much training you have too. However, if you get a gun with an external safety and intend on carrying it as such, you had better practice carrying your gun locked, unlocking it and firing, especially in the instance you should have to call upon on. There's a lot to be said about carrying your firearm in a manner that is most efficient! That index finger of yours should be the one and only dependable safety mechanism! Remember to always carry all your firearms the same way - muscle memory! I have the SR40 and refuse to use the safety should I carry it...

  15. #15
    berettabone is offline Banned
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    I've been a handgun owner for 37 years..........ALL of my firearms have safeties...........doesn't mean you have to use them ALL of the time......

  16. #16
    Nanuk's Avatar
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    How much crap on a gun do you need to fiddle with? Get a Glock. There is nothing to fiddle with, keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot. Keep it simple.

  17. #17
    paratrooper is offline Senior Member
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    Most people associate a firearm with having an obvious safety of some kind. When introduced to one w/o a safety, they tend to freak out and go nuts.

    I have firearms with manual safeties and some with built-in safeties, but no manual safeties.

    Firearms are no different than automobiles. They all drive a bit differently, and once you get used to that, it's not a big deal.

  18. #18
    berettabone is offline Banned
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    I agree....buy the Glock and get it over with....then, when you find out you don't like it, you can start your search over again.....and we won't have to continue answering the same questions over and over and over
    Quote Originally Posted by denner View Post
    Buy the glock and get it over with. Glock's are fantastic firearms which are as safe as it's owner, thousands and thousands are carried by law enforcement every day. Generally they are easier to shoot as compared to a DA/SA unless you put some time in with the DA. Get in the habit of doing breech checks, knowing when the trigger is forward it is cocked and carry it or store it in a good kydex holster and you should be good to go.

  19. #19
    usmcj's Avatar
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    All due respect .... If proper, and proficient manipulation of a manual safety is beyond the scope of a persons abilities, it's real likely that person shouldn't own a firearm, much less carry one.

  20. #20
    FloridaGuy's Avatar
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    Well I was in your position about 2 months ago. I was also looking at a Glock as my first handgun. I was told by my LGS owner that Glocks do not fit most people’s hands correctly. Even though they have a lot of Glocks in the case he recommends that people not buy them unless they have very large hands.

    He recommended one of the M&P Semi-Automatics for me.When I held the M&P 9mm FS it did feel much better in my hand then any of the Glocks that I tried. I ended up purchasing the M&P 9 FS and the M&P9c from him.

    As far as a safety on a gun goes my feelings are this. I have always been taught that your safety is your finger. Keep your finger off the trigger until you have acquired the target and you’re ready to fire. I don’t use any mechanical safeties on any of my semi-automatics and my revolvers don’t have a mechanical safety on them.

    But like everybody else has said it is a personal preferenceand everyone that owns guns will have to make their own decision. Go with what ever makes you the most comfortable. I would suggest that you handle as many firearms with and without safeties and see which you like the best.

    Be Safe,
    FloridaGuy

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