View Poll Results: Do you own a glock?

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  • Yes

    52 31.71%
  • No

    88 53.66%
  • Had one got rid of it

    24 14.63%
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  1. #61
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Yeah, right. The same "unsafe" Safe-Action trigger that over 65% of law enforcement agencies use.

    How safe a Glock is in the hands of any given person, is a direct reflection on the safety attitudes and habits of the user. Most fans of the Glock design know and understand this; some of its detractors know it, too, and that sometimes goes a long way in explaining why they feel as they do.

    Yes, I'm a fan. I like them, shoot them quite well, and enjoy their simplicity and clean design. Not all of them work flawlessly, but that's true of most semi-automatic handguns, and most machines in general. And I never worry about rubbing an ugly bare spot on the slide with my holster, or leaving a fingerprint etched into the deep blue finish; they are all pre-uglyfied, and ready for use.
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  2. #62
    berettabone is offline Banned
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    It should be mentioned that the only way to get "glock leg" is from, well, you know.......

  3. #63
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by berettabone View Post
    It should be mentioned that the only way to get "glock leg" is from, well, you know.......
    Unfair!
    "Glock leg" is the result of user error, and not a mechanism malfunction.

  4. #64
    berettabone is offline Banned
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    Unfair, maybe, but like I said..................I realize that there is no such thing as an accident....always negligence.....

  5. #65
    WilliamC's Avatar
    WilliamC is offline Junior Member
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    Even my Greenie Stickem Cap Gun I had when I was a kid was made out of METAL. The only experience I ever had with a gun made out of plastic was when UNCLE SAM gave me a Black Plastic Gun when he wanted to send me to Vietnam and all it did was JAM JAM JAM.

  6. #66
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is offline Senior Member
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    When life gives you jam, add MRE peanut butter.

  7. #67
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    Wish to H... I still had my M14!

  8. #68
    Korben7p3c is offline Junior Member
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    I have one, and so does the wife- no, wait, -we HAD them until we too had a bad boat experience. I put on the brakes too hard once in our boat and they went flying off the bow, never to be seen again.
    That's how I remember it.

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernBoy View Post
    I have six, er had six until they all disappeared in that terrible boating accident.

  9. #69
    johna91374 is offline Junior Member
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    I've owned a G27 and G19. Didn't really care for either one. They are uncomfortable to shoot and didn't point naturally for me.

  10. #70
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    Reddog1 is offline Junior Member
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    If my Senco framing nailer ever goes bad I will buy a Glock to replace it. I guess they are good guns but they don't feel right when I hold them. Not comfortable.

  11. #71
    cashinin is offline Banned
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    I`ve had 2 Glocks and both ran flawlessly but when I purchased my HK USP my last Glock had to go...But I wouldn't hesitate purchasing another...What other gun can you buy a complete set of inside parts very cheap and put them in yourself without a gunsmith...I`d venture a guess that if Glock made another Model that had a different "look" they might take the rest of the market they don`t have now..Jim

  12. #72
    Donald is offline Junior Member
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    a buddy had a glock he and i traded guns for a clip or two. I shot two rounds and got my px4 back. there just so plain. I like an external hammer and more comfert

  13. #73
    Philco is offline Member
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    I do not own a Glock but I do own a S & W Sigma which is widely recognized as a Glock clone. I really like that gun.

  14. #74
    Brevard13 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holly View Post
    I don't understand at all when people say things like this. Do only the ugly guns work? I was under the impression that there were thousands of guns to choose from, half of which are not ugly. I would hope one of these options also "does the job", or gun manufacturers aren't doing their jobs properly.

    No reason a person cannot have pretty and reliable, if that is what they are looking for.
    My only thing about pretty guns. I tend to baby them alot more. Not only that with some of the stories i have heard and have read some places might destroy a gun that was used in a self defense shooting. IF that is actually true i would much rather lose a $500 Glock than a $1000 1911.

  15. #75
    Charlie's Avatar
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    I've owned several Glocks in the last 20 years. They are dependable, accurate, and relatively inexpensive. I've tried my very best to adapt to the grip but with no success. I sold my G23 a couple of weeks ago to a friend. I'm stickin' to my Colts, Smiths, and Rugers. For those that like the grip, you have a good gun that will probably do you well. Just my two bits.

  16. #76
    DJ Niner's Avatar
    DJ Niner is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by barstoolguru View Post
    if I want pretty I will go buy a painting of a sunset but if I want a gun that does the job I get a glock. the only time you see it is when it's time for business
    Quote Originally Posted by Holly View Post
    I don't understand at all when people say things like this. Do only the ugly guns work? I was under the impression that there were thousands of guns to choose from, half of which are not ugly. I would hope one of these options also "does the job", or gun manufacturers aren't doing their jobs properly.

    No reason a person cannot have pretty and reliable, if that is what they are looking for.
    The only problem with that (and I see it fairly regularly), is that folks like to keep their pretty guns "pretty." They won't take them out in poor/falling weather (because they might get dirty/dusty/grit-scratched), they won't draw them from a holster (because it might mar the finish), they won't pound 800-1000 rounds through them in a single weekend shooting class, and because of this, they never get really good with their "pretty" gun(s). I even have a old story to help illustrate the point; jump down to the second-to-the-last paragraph (below) if you want to skip story-time.

    Once upon a time, I was a firearms trainer in the USAF, and in the mid-80s, the FBI was going around to many local police departments and holding "Officer Survival" classes and range sessions. These focused on strategies, tactics, and on doing things that were useful in surviving armed encounters with criminals, but were prohibited in the officer's normal/formal firearm training sessions and qualifications. Examples might include shooting from various positions on the ground (like you'd been knocked down), and what to do if you unexpectedly found yourself in a criminal's gunsights and were forced to disarm (drop your gun).

    In the latter drill, you took your loaded revolver, and when told to do so, you gently tossed it on the ground (not TOO far away) so it landed with the muzzle facing away from you, with the right side of the gun "up". Then, with your hands held high in a surrender position, they would yell "GO!", and (don't try this at home, folks) you'd jump/lunge for your gun, pick it up, and quickly shoot all 6 shots into the target. It was a great drill, and a useful one based on the number of officers who had found themselves in similar situations but had no experience to fall back on, or confidence that they would do well if they needed to shoot their way out of a similar situation.

    Anyway, as the Emergency Services Team's assigned firearms instructor, I was invited to attend the range sessions and shoot with the group, even though I was not a sworn officer. However, because I was not a sworn officer, I could not attend the classroom sessions where they taught the tactics and reasoning behind the drills and described the drills in detail. I was told to show up at the range with a suitable weapon (I could not use my issue .38, as I was technically "off duty"), follow the instructions as given on the line, and that one of the FBI instructors would be posted nearby in case I had any questions.

    At that time, I only had one 4" duty-size revolver, so I grabbed my military web belt rig and transferred a slightly larger holster onto the belt for the range sessions. Then I packed up and went to the range. Upon arrival, I advanced to the firing line, uncased and holstered my revolver, then waited for the group to finish the class session. I talked with one of the agents a bit, and he expressed admiration for my weapon; I told him I was pretty happy with how it shot, and was just getting it broken-in as it was fairly new. He smiled a strange smile, and said something about how it would be a bit more broken-in by the end of the class, then wandered off to get something ready. I didn't even think about his comment until later.

    We went to the line, and shot several drills, reloading as soon as the gun was empty (this was a big change from the former method of "do everything on command"; the FBI found that when folks were trained like that, and then got into a gunfight, they sometimes didn't reload their gun once it was emptied -- because no one told them to reload after the first burst of gunfire). The next drill was announced, and I could hear a few of the cops I knew start to chuckle, but I didn't know what was going on quite yet.

    We advanced to the line, were reminded that this was a dangerous drill, and to be as safe as possible. We were then told to draw our weapon, reminded to try to get it to land with the right side facing up and the barrel pointing at the target, then told to toss our guns out into the gravel at least 6-8 feet in front of the line. I looked to my right, and then my left, and EVERY OTHER PERSON ON THE LINE WAS WATCHING AND WAITING FOR ME TO THROW MY GUN OUT INTO THE GRAVEL FIRST. I'd been set-up! I knew I had to do it, or the cops I worked with every day would never let me forget it. I sighed, swallowed hard, picked a spot out in front of me that looked softer than the surrounding area, and gently threw my month-old, high-polish royal-blue-finish, 4" Colt Python out into the dust/rocks/cracked gravel of the outdoor range.

    Then, one after one, the cops all threw their well-worn military-issue S&W model 15 .38 specials out into the gravel, we all assumed the hands-up position, and waited for the "GO!" command. We pounced on our guns, shook them once to get any gravel out of the barrel/chambers, and fired 6 rounds into the target as quickly as possible. Then we stood up, reloaded, re-holstered, and went back to the line to do it again. I got a nice round of polite applause for being dedicated enough to the course to sacrifice the finish on my gun for the learning experience, and was later told by one of the instructors that some cops in other classes had absolutely refused to do it with their personally-owned weapons. Some even objected to doing it with issued-by-their-department guns!

    Pretty much from that point on, I have always treated guns as tools, and like most tools, if you want to get enough experience to get GOOD with your favorite tool, it needs to get hot, dirty, holster-worn, and used hard under field/real-world conditions (or as close as we can safely get to it). Most folks who own one or two "pretty" guns just won't do that to their favorite blaster; heck, some of them will freak-out over a single tiny scratch!

    As some shooters begin to accumulate more handguns, it's not unusual for them to pick up a "nice" newer version of their favorite gun/brand, and keep another well-used one for regular shooting like classes, competitions, and such. These folks know the importance of regular practice, but also want at least one nice-looking gun and are willing to pay the price to keep two on-hand, one to fill each role. I even have a few Glocks that are basically stock, but have been dressed-up with a new silver-look finish on the slide/barrel for a bit of "bling"; some folks call guns like these their "BBQ" or "Sunday" or "formal" guns. Although these are a bit more fancy than my normal Glocks, they get shot regularly, too (usually on the indoor range).

    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
    (RIP, Mr. Camp; you will be remembered, and missed)

  17. #77
    MLB's Avatar
    MLB
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    It hurts to read that. I'd love to get my hands on a Royal Blued Python in 4".

    I agree with the point though. Some guns I have just because I like them (like the nicely blued S&W M27). I don't carry that cannon, and certainly am not as proficient with it as my ppk/s. The little stainless gun gets scratched up now and then, and the revolver is almost like new.

    That's not to say that it wouldn't do the job though. The gun can be good looking and effective, the problem (as DJ noted) is usually with the operator.

  18. #78
    Pistol Pete is offline Junior Member
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    I don't own a Glock, I would buy one if the right deal came along. It would be a great IDPA gun, probably the fastest. The trigger hurts my finger but there is probably a fix for it. It will never be something to look at, pure utility.

  19. #79
    Yiogo is offline Junior Member
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    My son in law has one. Shoots great. My preference is to buy guns made in the USA. Yogo

  20. #80
    Haas is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holly View Post
    I do not. Aesthetics are far too vital for me, when it comes to my guns.
    Same here. I find them to be "butt ugly". Although, they are a fine gun, but aesthetics are vital for me also.

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