View Poll Results: Which is the safest?

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  • Brain/Mindset

    48 77.42%
  • A firearm with all of the typical 1911 safeties

    3 4.84%
  • A Glock's safe-action trigger, or similar mechanism

    1 1.61%
  • A firearm with one manual safety

    2 3.23%
  • Muscle memory from sufficient training, no thinking required

    0 0%
  • A firearm with a Bio-safety (DNA analysis, fingerprint recognition, etc.)

    0 0%
  • No safety is needed, guns and shooters are flawless without

    0 0%
  • No gun is safe, except for the one in the scrap pile

    8 12.90%
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Thread: Firearms Safety

  1. #41
    rgrundy's Avatar
    rgrundy is offline Member
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    Had a very dangerous thing happen at the shoot yesterday. My 1911 went full auto during the competition. Good thing I knew enough just to bear down and hang on (191.9 power factor!). Got DQ'd until the onsite gunsmith fixed it and gave me a note for the Match Director. They'll let me finish the shoot today. This is a Springfield Armory Loaded 1911 and has is completely stock. Never had any trigger work done on it and has had few rounds through it. The trigger sure is sweet now. Got a trigger job for free. Need to wash my shorts though. You never know when a mechanical device will fail so some training is necessary. BTW the "Supersquad" (all us old s) got a last minute entry added. J.J. Racazza is shooting with us. Great young man and lots of fun to watch on the courses. I'll get some video today.

  2. #42
    scooter's Avatar
    scooter is offline Supporting Member - Legally Armed Scooter Trash
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    Quote Originally Posted by TedDeBearFrmHell View Post
    rocks are weapons too..... quarry = ammo dump

  3. #43
    rex
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    This has been entertaining.I think guns are like any inanimate object,they can't be dangerous for the most part.You need 2 things to make a gun dangerous,a brain and muscles-the kid in the scenario proves that.If you use a gun,you learn safety,how the gun operates,ballistics at least to the point things get broke when shot,and as much on top of that you can.Then you train your muscles into grip,finger press,etc.The most important muscle is the trigger finger,you must teach it to instinctively know what to do while you are concentrating on more important matters like a threat,backstop,an ambush,yada yada.An educated brain and muscles now lessens the danger to willful use of the object.Very few discharges happen without physically pulling the trigger.

    Here's controversy.I've had the safety snick off a few 1911s carrying before,condition 0.Most people freak,I saw that I needed to retension it,no biggie.How is it unsafe if it can sit there forever and not go off?The triggerguard is covered,the trigger can't move because of the grip safety,and if the sear just happened to snap the FP safety prevents a discharge.

    Conversely,I'd never carry a Glock.Where's the safety?In the friggin trigger.Serpas have proven the 'safe action' they have on reholsters with no human trigger contact.That can't happen on my 1911 because my trigger is locked from debris moving it.Debris in a Serpa can also lock your gun in it if anyone is considering one,severe use isn't where they're good.

    Just my opinion and things to ponder out of mainstream thinking.

  4. #44
    SteveC's Avatar
    SteveC is offline Junior Member
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    We can certainly twist this subject around a few dozen ways, but the basic question remains and it's good to have so many folks thinking about it. Sure a gun can't cause any harm on the scap heap, but that's not a very useful consideration since it is not an option any one of us is going to take up. Safety mechanisms have their place and I'm sure every one of them has prevented some bad stuff. They won't prevent bad things from happening, tho, if the user doesn't have the mindset of respect for a weapon and the mental discipline for proper handling ALL THE TIME.

  5. #45
    MLB's Avatar
    MLB
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    I have to chuckle a little reading through the semantics of these debates. They make me think that maybe we (gun owners) are a little defensive about calling a spade a spade. Of course, you and I know that the firearm will only do what it's "told", has no ill intent of its own, and is only "dangerous" to some degree when it's in someone's hand.

    All of the Captain Obvious pronouncements aside, a firearm is a tool that was designed to be "dangerous"; to kill actually. Ignoring the 500# gorilla in the room seems silly to me. All other things equal, an average man with a handgun in his hand is more "dangerous" (intentionally or otherwise) than a man with a stick or a pen. It is that way by design, lest this be called the pointy stick forum.

    Perhaps the question would be more precisely worded "Which safety mechanism is most effective in preventing AD/ND?" Short of any belief in magic, needling one another over "dangerous person with a handgun" or "dangerous handgun" seems pedantic. A firearm is a tool that is designed to be dangerous.

    OK, I have to go back through today's posts to see if anyone used "clip" inappropriately now, and chew them a new one...

  6. #46
    dman is offline Junior Member
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    Treat every firearm as loaded , one in the chamber and ready to kill.Mind set is very , very , important but , in my crazy life ,
    there are so many distractions I'm never sure of anything . when I set my pistol down and get some stupid question from my wife lets say , am I sure about anything ? No. I've seen some of the best make stupid mistakes because of distractions
    so always assume it is ready to kill .

  7. #47
    velo99 is offline Junior Member
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    Mindset is everything. Been teaching my daughters to shoot. We have safety sessions before we shoot at the range. Procedure procedure procedure. We recently went from revolver to automatic and it was enlightening to see the misteps in procedure. Dropping the mag was the most skipped step in "safeing" the weapon. Safety systems should be standardized IMO.

  8. #48
    usmcj's Avatar
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    Safety is pretty well standardized....

    1. Keep the barrel pointed in a safe direction
    2. Keep your finger off the trigger, until you're ready to shoot
    3. Keep firearms unloaded unless they're ready to use

    Store your firearms so as to prevent unauthorized access....


  9. #49
    velo99 is offline Junior Member
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    Those are general safety measures.
    The mechanical aspects are what lead to inadvertent discharges.
    If one is unfamiliar with a weapon or the safety is in a unusual place,
    people tend to be unsure of the condition of the weapon.
    Eventually the weapon has to be loaded and fired.
    That's when accidents occur. Standardization could at least reduce that chance.

  10. #50
    usmcj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by velo99 View Post
    Those are general safety measures.
    The mechanical aspects are what lead to inadvertent discharges.
    If one is unfamiliar with a weapon or the safety is in a unusual place,
    people tend to be unsure of the condition of the weapon.
    Eventually the weapon has to be loaded and fired.
    That's when accidents occur. Standardization could at least reduce that chance.
    No sir, mechanical aspects do NOT lead to inadvertent discharges. Firearms do NOT fire unless interacted with by a human. When any firearm is interacted with by a human, the observance of those three rules will NOT allow a discharge resulting in injury. You can "what if" this to death, but if you implement rule #1, and ignore rules #2, and #3, nobody gets hurt. If you implement #2, and ignore #3, and #1, the gun won't fire. If you implement #3, and ignore #1, and #2, the gun won't fire.

    Ignorance of the law is no excuse, neither is ignorance of the function of any given weapon possessed by any individual.

    I've taught those safety rules for many, many years. They work much better than any mechanical device.

  11. #51
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Once again:
    The most important safety device resides in your head, between your ears.

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    Once again:
    The most important safety device resides in your head, between your ears.
    ....and, once again....that's exactly where those three rules should reside, ready for instant recall....

    simply my opinion, of course.....

  13. #53
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by usmcj View Post
    ...that's exactly where those three rules should reside, ready for instant recall...
    Yup. Exactly.

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