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  1. #1
    maross396's Avatar
    maross396 is offline Junior Member
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    Cleaning the barrel

    I love the ability to get info on the net but am getting conflicting info on cleaning the barrel. Some say that you should never pull the brush back thru the barrel after the first pass but remove it from the rod and run it thru again. Some say that its fine to reverse the brush after it comes out but never to rverse the brush mid barrel. I have always soaked the barrel first with solvent, let sit then run the brush back and forth a few times before starting the patches. Any info is appreciated.

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  3. #2
    recoilguy's Avatar
    recoilguy is offline Senior Member
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    I have also heard both sides of this issue. I never heard the don't pull the brush back side until after I had been doing it for 35 years however. I own a bunch of weapons from rifles to shotguns to handguns. I do pull the brush back through all of them. As a matter of fact I got a brush with one of my pistols that came as a part of the deal that does not unscrew. If you push it through you either have to cut it off or you pull it back. It could be part of a conspiracy by the manufacturer to wear the barrel out sooner so you have to buy a new gun but I doubt it.

    There may be some validity to the don't do it point and I won't dispute it at all because I can't with any degree of expertise. I will say I pull the brush back through and have for almost 40 years now and all my gun still shoot where I point them and get really really clean.

    RCG

  4. #3
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    Pulling the brush (brass) back while it's still in the barrel will damage the brush. It will squish the bristles down and it won't work as well. The barrel should be made of hard enough steel not to notice. How much pressure and force is applied to a barrel when you fire an actual bullet through it? I tend to believe that your average cleaning brush is going to generate somewhat less force and potential wear. YMMV.

  5. #4
    SMann is offline Member
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    Good Gun Cleaning Info

    The above linked thread has all the barrel cleaning info you need.

  6. #5
    ozzy's Avatar
    ozzy is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by maross396 View Post
    I love the ability to get info on the net but am getting conflicting info on cleaning the barrel. Some say that you should never pull the brush back thru the barrel after the first pass but remove it from the rod and run it thru again. Some say that its fine to reverse the brush after it comes out but never to rverse the brush mid barrel. I have always soaked the barrel first with solvent, let sit then run the brush back and forth a few times before starting the patches. Any info is appreciated.
    I guess I've been doing it wrong for 40 years. My .22 rifle still shoots MOA after all these years.

  7. #6
    Doug B.'s Avatar
    Doug B. is offline Junior Member
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    I have found that if one is diligent about cleaning, (using the proper solvents, etc) many times I don't even use a brush. 40+ years and you will not see or find any copper fouling in my barrels.

    I don't shoot lead. only plated or jacketed projectiles.

  8. #7
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    I've been led to believe that most gun brushes are made from bronze, an alloy of copper and tin. Bronze, even in its spring temper form is softer than steel or stainless steel. I would imagine it would take an awful long time to cause any real wear. (It is possible, of course. Water is softer than stone but river rocks are smooth as glass from all the flowing water.)

    Some barrels are chrome lined which would make those barrels even harder and longer wearing.

  9. #8
    SMann is offline Member
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    My previous post contains a link to another thread on this site that details barrel cleaning do's and don'ts. Reasons for both are given. While the procedures and reasoning may be over the top for some, reading the thread will surely answer any questions you may have. What you do with the info is personal choice. It's kind of long, but worth reading.

  10. #9
    denner's Avatar
    denner is online now Senior Member
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    The crown of the barrel is the most crucial not to nick, if you do, your accuracy will suffer. I always start from the breach to bore, or be very careful when I clean revolvers from barrel to bore. No wire brush can damage the inside of the barrel, but the edges on where the brush connects, if metal, can cause some damage to the crown or feedramp if your not careful; like a previous post, a copper brush is much softer than steel, and a copper coated bullet traveling at 1100 to 1200 fps tunneling down the barrel even after many 1000's of rounds generally has no ill effect.

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