Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Wandering Man's Avatar
    Wandering Man is offline GM HGF Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Coastal Bend, TX
    Posts
    2,121

    Question Light weight .357

    I'm a newbie to shooting. That is, I've not really done any serious consideration of shooting as a skill until recently.

    I was suprised to find that my new Ruger P89 had more kick than my .357 Ruger Blackhawk. After some practice, I find that I can get a pretty good cluster with either.

    Last week I rented an S&W .38. I don't recall which model, but I believe it was titanium frame with five shots (revolver), 2 1/2" or 3" barrell and a built-in laser. Again, more kick than I bargained for.

    I was lucky to hit the silouette. I may have maimed or wounded him, but definately did not kill the target. After 1/3 box of ammo, I was at least consistently hitting in the same place. That same place just happened to be to the right of where I was aiming. I accomplished this by giving up on the sight, and focusing on the laser dot.

    All shots were at 15 yards. When I commented about my poor aim to the rental clerk, he said it was a tough gun to shoot for a beginner.

    What adjustments would one need to make to become a bit more accurate with a small, lightweight handgun?

    Thanks,

    WM

  2. #2
    Shipwreck's Avatar
    Shipwreck is online now HGF Forum Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Beretta City, Texas
    Posts
    10,902
    Well, those titanium/scandium revolvers are so light, and the lighter the gun, the more the recoil. I've heard that some of those small allow revolvers han really beat your hand to hell. Generally, the bigger the gun (NOT bigger the caliber), the less the recoil.

    Now, the P89 shouldn't really have that heavy of a recoil. I shot one many, many years ago. Seemed ok. Kinda similiar to a Beretta 92's recoil. Usually, the metal framed guns have less recoil than polymer ones.

    Try a steel revolver if U want less recoil - maybe a 357 revolver w/ 38 rounds. Make sure U have some rubber grips, though. It makes it more comfortable.

    As for semi-autos - I personally think the Beretta 92 has the least amount of recoil out of any 9mm I have ever fired.

  3. #3
    Richard's Avatar
    Richard is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Michigan
    Posts
    366
    I would sooner shoot a hand held cannon than an ultra lightweight snub. Those little beasts kick! See my comments on a 18.5 oz 44 Special they also apply to the 357 snub. Thoughts on the .44 Special revolver........ Regards, Richard

  4. #4
    Wandering Man's Avatar
    Wandering Man is offline GM HGF Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Coastal Bend, TX
    Posts
    2,121
    Thanks for the reassurance. Shipwreck, the P89 handles really nice. I don't know if I dare say this in this forum, but I liked it a lot better than the Glock the salesfolk tried to push on me.

    I picked up the little S&W because I'm looking for something I might want to carry in the future (I'm waiting for my CCW). I think it would be important that what I carry be something I can actually hit a target with, and not just show in a menacing way, should that ever become necessary.

    WM

  5. #5
    Shipwreck's Avatar
    Shipwreck is online now HGF Forum Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Beretta City, Texas
    Posts
    10,902
    One of these days, I may pick up a Ruger semi-auto... I think they are a good deal for the $

  6. #6
    Bob Wright's Avatar
    Bob Wright is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    1,548
    Two factor affect recoil most: (1) weight of the gun (2) weight of the bullet.

    The lightweight revolvers (.38 Special) handle the 95gr and 110gr. bullet loads easiest. Going up in bullet weight, go up in gun weight.

    And, I can't recommend rubber grips to anybody. The rubber grips and abrades your hand upon firing. Wood, or better, ivory, will allow the gun to slip slightly and feel far mor comfortable after several rounds have been fired. And those soft grips give the gun a good running start before it hits your palm.

    Bob Wright

  7. #7
    Baldy's Avatar
    Baldy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Port St.John,FL.
    Posts
    6,740
    I have shot 2" & 3" packing revolvers all my life and it's true, they will bite you. When you frist start out, stay away from the hot stuff and work up to the .357's & 44's. My wife hates my Ruger 21/4" but loves to shoot my Phyton 6" barrel with .357's. I can put some mild 38's in the Ruger and she is happy. It's the recoil you got to learn to handle. To be in the X-ring takes a good deal of practice.

  8. #8
    Thor's Avatar
    Thor is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Texas !! :D
    Posts
    447
    I have a DE in 357 and because of it's weight, the recoil is barely noticeable. In the same vein, I have a 30.06 rifle that's all synthetic and it's downright painful to shoot. (IF anybody knows of a decent M1 Garand for sale cheap, let me know!!) In my experience & as others have said, the lighter the gun, the more felt recoil. I guess sacrifices or concessions must be made someplace.

  9. #9
    jimg11 is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    201

    Thumbs down Lightweight?

    Quote Originally Posted by Thor
    In my experience & as others have said, the lighter the gun, the more felt recoil. I guess sacrifices or concessions must be made someplace.
    My dad always told me that there isn't any free lunch! Power vs. recoil / weight vs recoil / Bullet weight vs Recoil / Bullet weight vs speed / Speed vs noise / barrel length vs concealibility / size vs handiness / size vs concealibility, / size of ammo vs number of rounds in the mag.
    The whole world revolves on compromise. If it didn't I would have a super concealible sub compact .45 that fired from 20 round mags with super accuracy and great knockdown power but no recoil.

  10. #10
    Charlie's Avatar
    Charlie is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Kerr County Texas
    Posts
    2,841
    Kinda like all those other folks said.........shoot the biggest gun (not necessarily caliber) you can conceal (if that's what you're buying it for). That P89 might be a real good starter, all steel, 9mm low recoil, and it CAN be concealed if you buy a good pancake or IWB holster (emphasis on "good"). In my way of thinking, the snubs are good for one thing, to use when there is absolutely nothing else. Shoot light loads to practice, load it up with self defence loads and carry it a LOT. I liked my P89 a lot.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

colt 357 light weight
,
how much does a 38 special revolver waight
,
light weight .357
,

light weight 357 revolver

,
light weight 357 weigh
,
lightest lightweight 357 revolvers
,

lightest weight 357

,
lightest weight 357 revolver
,

lightweight .357

,

lightweight 357 pistols

,

lightweight 357 revolver

,
lightweight 357 revolvers
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1