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  1. #1
    MusProd is offline Junior Member
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    Oct 2010
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    Back for more advice - 2 stove pipes

    Background : After 25 years I'm coming back to shooting, which I had to quit after I was injured when my car was rear ended by a tandem axle dump truck. After 1 year of therapy I was fully functional (but still have weak right shoulder and neck muscles), yet I never competed or even shot again. Today I took my High Standard Victor .22 LR bull's-eye gun in for a professional cleaning as it was sluggish as can be when dry firing. The gun smith is backed up, so it will be 2-3 weeks.

    I am interested in getting a 9mm or possibly a .380 compact pistol. While at the range today visiting the gun smith, I ran 50 .380 rounds through a Sig p232, and I had 2 stove pipes. I thought my hold was pretty solid, and my surprisingly good accuracy after so many years might lend credence to a good hold, but I still had 2 stove pipes. Is the .380 known for this type of jam as the range officer commented, or should I look to blame my hold, the model p232, or possibly it being a rental gun?

    When I pick up my .22 I'll then try a 9mm.

    All comments are appreciated.

  2. #2
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Feb 2008
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    Best way to tell: Try a different gun, in the same caliber if possible, and see if the problem resurfaces.

  3. #3
    MusProd is offline Junior Member
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    Oct 2010
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    I tried a different gun in a different caliber and was extremely pleased.

    I shot the Sig p239 sa/da 9mm, and I shot it much better than the p232 .380. The felt recoil was much, much less, and the gun fit my hand perfectly. That little p232 boarded on nasty. There were no stove pipes, so I will never know if my experience with the p232 was the gun or the load. I now know it wasn't my hold, as my hold was great on the p239.

    I will be buying a p239 either tomorrow of the following day. I was really impressed, and I only had 2 fliers out of 50, and this is after being away from shooting for at least 20-25 years. My groups weren't very tight, but they were all in the black (except for the 2 fliers). Some range time should have me shooting tighter groups. I'll probably get an hour of coaching, as I am not too proud to say I can use it.

    Thanks for this forum. It's terrific.

  4. #4
    hunterfisher808's Avatar
    hunterfisher808 is offline Junior Member
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    Oct 2010
    Location
    Hawaiian Islands
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    I injured my right shoulder and found that I was not holding my gun as firmly as I normally do, this was evident in my poor shooting. Once I realized and firmed it up a bit it all settled down with my next 20 or so shots cutting dead center bull @ 25 yds.....ok, ok thats a load of bull....but I did settle down to some serious respectable groups. Could it be that you are limp wristing to some degree? this will buffer the slide from retracting fully or with full energy....just food for thought as I know I kinda unconcsciously nursed/babied my injured side.

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