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  1. #1
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Lead bullets/jacketed bullets

    The more convenient range near my home only allows lead bullets and no jacketed ammo at all.

    Some weapons are calling out jacketed ammo only.

    I know that the 1911 Colt allows lead bullets.

    What about Glocks? Sigs? Kel-tec 9? Kahr 45?

  2. #2
    dosborn's Avatar
    dosborn is offline Member HGF Gold Member
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    Your Glock will need a different barrel for lead. The others should be just fine. You will spend a little more time cleaning too, at least I did.

  3. #3
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by dosborn View Post
    Your Glock will need a different barrel for lead. The others should be just fine. You will spend a little more time cleaning too, at least I did.
    Do I buy a Glock barrel or something else (Bar-sto?).

  4. #4
    LowPro313 is offline Junior Member
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    Are you sure that you do not have that reversed? The ranges over here only allow jacketed ammo and no lead or reloaded ammo. I dont understand why the range by you does not allow jacketed ammo.

  5. #5
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Jacketed ammo can dent steel backdrops and cause ricochets. The all lead ammo will not do this.

    I guess if your steel is thick enough you can allow the jacketed ammo, but apparently they did not spring for the heavier steel.

  6. #6
    crazy charlie's Avatar
    crazy charlie is offline Junior Member
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    I would check to see if 'your range' allows frangible bullets. They are non-toxic and will not richochet.
    I'm surprised that they even allow lead. Assuming it's an indoor range I hope they have a good ventilation system as lead is very toxic.
    A local indoor range here only allows frangible ammo. It works in any firearm.

  7. #7
    LowPro313 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazy charlie View Post
    I would check to see if 'your range' allows frangible bullets. They are non-toxic and will not richochet.
    I'm surprised that they even allow lead. Assuming it's an indoor range I hope they have a good ventilation system as lead is very toxic.
    A local indoor range here only allows frangible ammo. It works in any firearm.
    That's baffles me also because the range by me also does not allot frangible ammo. I do not understand how some ranges only allow the ammo that is banned around here in ranges. I have not seen an indoor range around here that allows lead or frangible.

  8. #8
    TOF's Avatar
    TOF
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    If you do use lead, cleaning the barrel is very easy. Simply place the barrel in a mixture 50% white vinegar and 50% hydrogen peroxide (drug store strength) for 3 to 5 minutes then push the crud out with a cloth patch. If extremly heavy lead doesn't clean up in 5 minutes put it back in for a second round. Avoid the fumes which are minimal.

    Finish with a protective coat of Hoppes or similar as you would when cleaning after using jacketed rounds.

  9. #9
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOF View Post
    If you do use lead, cleaning the barrel is very easy. Simply place the barrel in a mixture 50% white vinegar and 50% hydrogen peroxide (drug store strength) for 3 to 5 minutes then push the crud out with a cloth patch. If extremly heavy lead doesn't clean up in 5 minutes put it back in for a second round. Avoid the fumes which are minimal.

    Finish with a protective coat of Hoppes or similar as you would when cleaning after using jacketed rounds.
    I did not know this. I looked it up. The resultant solution is called peracetic acid, and it is also a powerful (but safe) anti-bacterial agent useful for cleaning counter tops and cutting boards.

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