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Thread: Gun scrubber?

  1. #1
    GTD
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    Gun scrubber?

    First thread!! I hear a lot of comments about hoppe’s #9 gun solvent. How many of you use a spray, like gun scrubber? When I clean my p226, after disassembling I spray down the gun, and inside the barrel. Then I spray some gun scrubber on a bore snake and run it threw the barrel twice. Then I give it a light coat of rem oil. Should I be using some better products? The 226 I purchased in Jan. has been performing flawlessly for about 500+ rounds, several different brands.

  2. #2
    gmaske's Avatar
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    You'll get as many diffrent answers as there are people on this board. I've used the Gun Scrubber for a deep clean. The stuff works pretty good but Lord is it nasty! It reminds me of Carb. cleaner. I only use it when the pistol is super dirty. I am currently using Hoppe's #9 for general cleaning mostly because everybody sells it. I just started using Gunslick's Gum-Foam as a lube and protectant. It leaves a great shine and the stuff stays were you put it on slide rails and such. I think it's great stuff. There is some stuff out that is called Steel Shield Weapon Shield Gun Oil. It is suppose to make gun clean up a snap. I haven't tried the stuff but it's getting rave revues. The places I shop are always sold out of it. As to cleaning, I'm old school and use a bronze brush on the bore.

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    Baldy's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    The only thing not to do is leave some of these special chemical cleaners in a gun you are going to store for a long time. Always clean good and the last step use gun oil and clean and patch the barrel good. Hoppes will not pit the barrel like some of these new fangled wonder cleaners. Copper and lead removers can be some of the hardest things on your gun. Just be sure you get it all out when done. Good shooting.

  4. #4
    gmaske's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baldy View Post
    The only thing not to do is leave some of these special chemical cleaners in a gun you are going to store for a long time. Always clean good and the last step use gun oil and clean and patch the barrel good. Hoppes will not pit the barrel like some of these new fangled wonder cleaners. Copper and lead removers can be some of the hardest things on your gun. Just be sure you get it all out when done. Good shooting.
    I've never tried any of that stuff. It's just me and the Hoppe's and my bronze brush, patches, and time....lots and lots of TIME!

  5. #5
    TOF's Avatar
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    Soap and water still works. Just be sure it is thoroughly dry then lightly oil.


  6. #6
    milquetoast is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmaske View Post
    You'll get as many diffrent answers as there are people on this board. I've used the Gun Scrubber for a deep clean. The stuff works pretty good but Lord is it nasty! It reminds me of Carb. cleaner. I only use it when the pistol is super dirty. I am currently using Hoppe's #9 for general cleaning mostly because everybody sells it. I just started using Gunslick's Gum-Foam as a lube and protectant. It leaves a great shine and the stuff stays were you put it on slide rails and such. I think it's great stuff. There is some stuff out that is called Steel Shield Weapon Shield Gun Oil. It is suppose to make gun clean up a snap. I haven't tried the stuff but it's getting rave revues. The places I shop are always sold out of it. As to cleaning, I'm old school and use a bronze brush on the bore.
    Gun Scrubber is actually non-chlorinated brake cleaner. It dissolves oil, and much of the dirt in guns is bound together by the oil that was used to lubricate the gun. It is indeed nasty. Use it outside, if possible. I recommend latex gloves and eye protection when using the stuff, and prefer not to use it when something less toxic will work. (I use it to clean inaccessible places, like the firing pin hole in a 1911.) Hoppes works, provided you give it time. Many people apply it and start scrubbing immediately. Better to wet things down, and walk away for a while. Come back later, and everything should wipe off easily, with no scrubbing.

    Because Gun Scrubber removes oil, you need to re-lube everything. In some cases, it can make plastic parts "cloudy," and it dries out wood stocks and can make them vulnerable to cracking.

  7. #7
    GTD
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    Thanks for all the responses. I have always been careful with gun scrubber, but I think I’ll be switching to hoppe’s.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by milquetoast View Post
    Gun Scrubber is actually non-chlorinated brake cleaner. It dissolves oil, and much of the dirt in guns is bound together by the oil that was used to lubricate the gun. It is indeed nasty. Use it outside, if possible. I recommend latex gloves and eye protection when using the stuff, and prefer not to use it when something less toxic will work. (I use it to clean inaccessible places, like the firing pin hole in a 1911.) Hoppes works, provided you give it time. Many people apply it and start scrubbing immediately. Better to wet things down, and walk away for a while. Come back later, and everything should wipe off easily, with no scrubbing.

    Because Gun Scrubber removes oil, you need to re-lube everything. In some cases, it can make plastic parts "cloudy," and it dries out wood stocks and can make them vulnerable to cracking.
    They have a synthetic safe version that is labeled as safe for wood and plastics. I use it exclusively.

  9. #9
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    I'll use Hoppe's but lately I've been using Break Free CLP (Clean/Lube/Protect). It cleans my guns very well, especially given a little soak time on the stubborn areas. Best part is it's one-step stuff since it also lubricates. I'll still sometimes put a couple of drops of gun oil in spots like the trigger, slide, or ejector rod and star of my revolver, but a good CLP does generally save a little time and does a good job of cleaning as well.

    Can't go wrong with Hoppe's either though.
    Last edited by Wyatt; 05-08-2008 at 12:11 PM.

  10. #10
    PhilR. is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTD View Post
    Should I be using some better products? The 226 I purchased in Jan. has been performing flawlessly for about 500+ rounds, several different brands.
    If your pistol functions just fine, and does not have any signs of corrosion or excessive wear, then you are just fine, and have no real need to change what you are already doing.

    I use the newer GS on the frame mechanicals, followed by Tetra gun spray. The Tetra has a light lubricating oil in it. The bore/barrel and slide get #9 or CLP, depending on my mood, followed by grease on the rails and oil on the barrel/slide mating surfaces. If I don't anticipate shooting a pistol for a while, I will run an oily patch through the bore, as I'm not sure about CLP's capacity for long-term corrosion protection.

    PhilR.

  11. #11
    Liko81 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyatt View Post
    I'll use Hoppe's but lately I've been using Break Free CLP (Clean/Lube/Protect). It cleans my guns very well, especially given a little soak time on the stubborn areas. Best part is it one-step stuff since it also lubricates. I'll still sometimes put a couple of drops of gun oil in spots like the trigger, slide, or ejector rod and star of my revolver, but a good CLP does generally save a little time a does a good job of cleaning as well.

    Can't go wrong with Hoppe's either though.
    I agree. I prefer CLP to Hoppes as a cleaner, and not having to clean it out and run an oiled swab through is a plus; the last patch that runs through clean is the last one I have to run. However, it's really not much of a lubricant for most of the parts (too thin). I use a thicker, non-petroleum lube called Ballistol on the slide, chamber and barrel. The CLP is still fine for most internal workings. When the Ballistol runs out (it's good stuff, but it has an odd smell) I'll probably pick up a tube of moly grease and use it wherever I need something thicker than CLP.

    Another lube to consider is extremely cheap by volume as gun oils go, and will definitely do the job. 10w30 motor oil. Think about it. You clean your gun maybe every 500 to 1000 cycles, and that's considered a torture test. A car's cylinder makes about 1500-2000 cycles per SECOND at IDLE. Now, it's not a cleaner or barrel preservative, but as a pure lubricating oil I think it'll handle the worst your gun's action can throw at it.

  12. #12
    milquetoast is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dredd View Post
    They have a synthetic safe version that is labeled as safe for wood and plastics. I use it exclusively.
    Thanks. I'll look for it in the stores.

  13. #13
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    I clean mine with #9, and lube with synthetic 5w-30

  14. #14
    GTD
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    Motor oil!! I love it. Makes sense also. How about Mobil 1 0W-40?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by milquetoast View Post
    Gun Scrubber is actually non-chlorinated brake cleaner.
    Bingo!

    Gun scrubber at my local sporting goods store is $9 to $12 for a 16 oz can; Non-clorinated ("enviro friendly") brake cleaner is $3.50 for a 20oz can at the local Auto Parts store -- guess what I do...

    I also once purchase a "chlorinated hydrocarbon" gun cleaner; after that, I now buy the $2.50 for 20oz can specials of the "regular" CRC. The stuff works quite well -- just keep it away from plastic, rubber, paper, et cetera -- and lube well when done...

    Oh, and it does NOT work for Black Powder -- Standard soap & water are still the order of the day there -- followed by thorough drying and appropriate oiling...

    Speaking of which, oiling that is, for some applications I've had excellent results with Kroil (tm) -- anybody else tried that stuff?

    -101-

  16. #16
    Ram Rod's Avatar
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    Birchwood/Casey Gun scrubber? I use it. Not often, but when I break down my 10/22's I use it to blast the bolts clean. Be sure to wear your safety glasses when using this stuff.

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