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  1. #1
    Fredericianer's Avatar
    Fredericianer is offline Junior Member
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    Unjacketed 9mm in autos; safe or not?

    I've heard that using unjacketed ammunition in Glocks is a bad idea as lead build-up can cause the pistol to explode. Is it safe to use in other pistols?

    I know that the problem is likely to be more apparent in Glocks as they have an unsupported chamber, but could lead build-up cause higher pressures (and possible catastrophic failure) in other pistols too?

    If so, how much could you safely shoot before it would be necessary to clean the lead out? I know that it will depend on various factors like how hard the lead is, and which type of pistol, but if anyone could give me a ballpark figure I'd be grateful.

    The reason I'm asking is that FMJ ammunition cannot be used at my club (at least until we find somewhere we can build an outdoor range).

    Regards
    Fredericianer

  2. #2
    gmaske's Avatar
    gmaske is offline Senior Member
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    If you want to use lead bullets it is ok with this stipulation. You need to drive them at a reduced powder load and check your barrel often for leading. If you get the combo right it won't foul the barrel with lead. What happens is if the force is to great the bullet will skid through a section of the barrel because the metal isn't strong enough to grip the rifling in the barrel. Most lead bullets are an alloy of lead and tin or some other metal or metals. This will harden the metal and help prevent leading.
    The short answer is you can shoot lead bullets all day long with no lead issues if you take the time to learn the tricks and keep an eye on your barrel. Most reload manuals have reduced formulas for cast lead bullet that are good formulas but they are contingent on bullets of a correct hardness so alway check for leading.

  3. #3
    submoa is offline Member
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    Avoid mixing lead and polygonal bores.

  4. #4
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
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    Easiest solution with the Glock is just to get a drop-in aftermarket barrel with conventional rifling.

    I know some people who shoot lead in their Glocks, but they are religious about cleaning the bore every 50-100 rounds. Still, I am not crazy about the idea and don't recommend it.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

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    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  5. #5
    Don357's Avatar
    Don357 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Barham View Post
    Easiest solution with the Glock is just to get a drop-in aftermarket barrel with conventional rifling.

    I know some people who shoot lead in their Glocks, but they are religious about cleaning the bore every 50-100 rounds. Still, I am not crazy about the idea and don't recommend it.
    I'm not a fan of the Glocks but Mike is and knows his stuff about Glock pistols. I read about this in a performance tune up manual. Due to the polygonal rifleing in the standard Glock barrel it is not wise to shoot "lead heads" in your Glock unless you use an aftermarket barrel such as are available from "Wilson".

    Or, you could buy ANY other gun with coventional rifleing!

  6. #6
    Wyatt's Avatar
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    I've been wondering about the reason for the "rules" regarding FMJ and unjacketed rounds at ranges. My range is actually the opposite of yours, Fredricianer, so I'm confused.

    It is also an indoor range, but they require FMJ, no unjacketed ammo allowed. I understand why they require FMJ in their rental guns to avoid having to clean them as often. Anyone know what the deal is? Why do some ranges, like mine, require FMJ, while others, like Fredricianer's are the opposite?

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