View Poll Results: Press Checks, Do Ya Do 'Em?

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  • Yes

    53 58.24%
  • No, use the barrel hood peephole

    2 2.20%
  • No, use the loaded chamber indicator

    9 9.89%
  • No, I always know the condition of my gun

    18 19.78%
  • No (other.. please explain.. or not)

    9 9.89%
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  1. #1
    submoa is offline Member
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    Press Checks, Do Ya Do 'Em?

    Putting forward serration on slides seems to be an increasingly popular custom modification to make press checks easier. How many of us do press checks?

    To answer the obvious, "What's a press check?" questions:

    To visually confirm whether a round is chambered, you bring the slide back just enough to peek inside, but not enough to eject the round.

    PS. Dropping the mag and locking the slide back before handing over a pistol is more than just good manners.

  2. #2
    Dsig1's Avatar
    Dsig1 is offline Member
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    My XD's and my S&W Sigma have visual features where you can see if there is a chambered round. I do press checks in them when I'm dry firing with snap caps but that's about it. I definitely press check my 1911 and P3AT.

  3. #3
    gmaske's Avatar
    gmaske is offline Senior Member
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    Unless I'm at the range and about to let my buddy shoot my pistol I will drop the mag and lock the slide back before allowing ANYONE to handle my gun PERIOD. If I'm going to handle my own pistol I will pull the slide back and check. If I put the gun down for a few I'll do it again even if I know it's empty. It's just a plain good practice. Eventually my main squeeze will ALWAYS be loaded as a concealed carry so I made this a personal rule. I really don't want someone to hand me a pistol in any other condition but this one either.

  4. #4
    john doe. is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmaske View Post
    Unless I'm at the range and about to let my buddy shoot my pistol I will drop the mag and lock the slide back before allowing ANYONE to handle my gun PERIOD. If I'm going to handle my own pistol I will pull the slide back and check. If I put the gun down for a few I'll do it again even if I know it's empty. It's just a plain good practice. Eventually my main squeeze will ALWAYS be loaded as a concealed carry so I made this a personal rule. I really don't want someone to hand me a pistol in any other condition but this one either.
    Ditto

  5. #5
    mathewsman is offline Junior Member
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    check

    In my S&W99 i can see the casing when it is in the gun

  6. #6
    Todd is offline Banned
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    I don't press check. My carry gun is always loaded and I go on the assumption that my other guns are always hot as well. I figure it's safer to assume that the guns are always loaded than to try to remember what condition they are in. I don't ever rely on the chamber loaded indicator on my XD.

  7. #7
    TOF's Avatar
    TOF
    TOF is offline Senior Member
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    I look in the test port to check for brass when I get dressed in the morning. If I want it unloaded I lock the slide back and drop the mag or dump the rounds from the cylinder when dealing with the revolver. If I am cleaning, dry firing or have placed them in storage they will be empty otherwise they are ready to go at the flick of a finger.


  8. #8
    GTD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    I don't press check. My carry gun is always loaded and I go on the assumption that my other guns are always hot as well. I figure it's safer to assume that the guns are always loaded than to try to remember what condition they are in. I don't ever rely on the chamber loaded indicator on my XD.
    Not sure what the experts say is best, but I do the same as Todd. I donít have a indicator on my p226. I have one on my markIII, but I never look at it.

  9. #9
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
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    I voted no.

    The system I use is basically this: if the pistol is in a holster, it's loaded (by which I mean fully loaded). Doesn't matter if it's on my hip, in the night table, or in the safe. I handle my weapons daily, and am well aware of their conditions of readiness. I am also the only person who handles my weapons.

    Pistols out of holsters (in the safe or ready for the semiannual cleaning session) are clear. These I check, since "unloaded" guns are much more dangerous than loaded one, but this isn't a press check.

    At Front Sight, they have you press checking your pistol every damn time time you step to the line, which about drove me nuts. I guess it's okay for newer shooters who need to be constantly reminded about the condition of their weapons.

    The main reason I don't press check is that I fondle loaded weapons as little as possible. A press check is an excellent opportunity for an ND.
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  10. #10
    milquetoast is offline Member
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    All of my guns are always loaded. All. Always. No exceptions.

    I can understand the competition guys press-checking. They are on cold ranges, and their guns are constantly changing from loaded to unloaded to loaded to unloaded. They need to check. I don't shoot on cold ranges.

    Like Mike, I don't like "fiddling." The most dangerous time for airplanes is take-offs and landings. The most dangerous time for guns is loading and unloading. Constant press-checking seems like an invitation to an unexpected loud noise.

  11. #11
    JeffWard's Avatar
    JeffWard is offline Senior Member
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    +1 Milquetoast

  12. #12
    James NM's Avatar
    James NM is offline Senior Member
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    No press checks for me.

    My carry gun is always loaded. No need to press check it.

    The guns in my safe are always unloaded. I open the cylinder or lock back the slide when I pull them out. No need to press check them.

  13. #13
    Tscott's Avatar
    Tscott is offline Junior Member
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    I have tried the press check, but find on my Kel tec P11 that in order to see the round in the chamber you must pull the slide far enough back that the round is partially ejected, and then when released causes a jam. Maybe it's me or maybe it's the gun, but I can,t seem to work it out. So I just drop the mag and pull the slide to the open position.

    Tom

  14. #14
    hawcer's Avatar
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    Yep! But only when I get a click,instead of a bang ,when I pull the trigger.It is otherwise Loaded unless I am passing it off at the range...then it is dropped mag and slide locked back.

  15. #15
    babs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tnoisaw View Post
    Ditto
    Ditto ditto... I like to receive or hand off any semi-auto without mag, slide locked open and no chambered round confirmed.

  16. #16
    Joeshwa24's Avatar
    Joeshwa24 is offline Member
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    I do it out of habbit but all the guns in my home are always loaded, I have to go with the "A loaded weapon is much more safe than an 'unloaded' weapon" mentality. If I am handing my weapon to someone I drop the Mag and lock the chamber open every time, no exception.

  17. #17
    babs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Barham View Post
    ..The main reason I don't press check is that I fondle loaded weapons as little as possible. A press check is an excellent opportunity for an ND.
    That's an excellent point. A person handling a gun that's been in his hands after loading or unloading should typically have the presence of mind about him to know the status of the weapon, I'd imagine. (disclaimer of considering any every and all as loaded with muzzle-point appropriately managed at all times as per the rules)

    Makes me think, if you're not breaking down the weapon for service or handing it off to someone or voluntarily setting the gun down on table or work bench, why mess with it? Consider it LOADED, whether you know it is or isn't, unless you're field stripping the weapon. So if you're handing it off to someone, just one proper check should be sufficient, correct? Same with receiving the weapon from someone else... Which goes back to my first statement about liking to lock the slide, remove mag and check chambe for that.

  18. #18
    Dsig1's Avatar
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    My question is, "during a press check, the slide is drawn slightly back to check for a chambered round, if the round is confirmed for firing, can the action of performing the press check cause an FTF because the slide might not correctly lock closed?" I know I like the reassurance of that slide banging closed as a round is being chambered.

  19. #19
    submoa is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dsig1 View Post
    My question is, "during a press check, the slide is drawn slightly back to check for a chambered round, if the round is confirmed for firing, can the action of performing the press check cause an FTF because the slide might not correctly lock closed?" I know I like the reassurance of that slide banging closed as a round is being chambered.
    There is a chance of failing to return to battery as a result of a press check in non-1911s. Putting the safety on with a 1911 pushes the safety lever into a corresponding V-notch in the slide that ensures RTB (return to battery). Safety on, hammer back, is condition one - the way a 1911 was meant to be carried. I've heard of some folks with non-1911s press the slide forward after a press check to ensure RTB.

    I'm really interested in the responses to this question as I'm increasingly seeing forward serrations as a popular customization - obstensibly for press checks - on all guns, 1911, glocks, XDs, even PPKs.

  20. #20
    PhilR. is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Barham View Post
    The main reason I don't press check is that I fondle loaded weapons as little as possible. A press check is an excellent opportunity for an ND.
    +1

    If you've ever seen what happens to a finger located just below the muzzle when a centerfire pistol goes off (how some press-check a 1911), then you will be cured of the habit. If you don't know what happens, take a piece of fruit along when you next go shooting. Rest the muzzle of your pistol on top of the tomato or whatever and let a round go.

    I have two kinds of handguns - one set is for defense and are always loaded. The other is for range/fun use, and are never kept loaded. There's no in between, so I always know if a round is chambered.

    PhilR.

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