View Poll Results: Press Checks, Do Ya Do 'Em?

Voters
91. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    53 58.24%
  • No, use the barrel hood peephole

    2 2.20%
  • No, use the loaded chamber indicator

    9 9.89%
  • No, I always know the condition of my gun

    18 19.78%
  • No (other.. please explain.. or not)

    9 9.89%
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 47
  1. #21
    PhilR. is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    982
    Quote Originally Posted by submoa View Post
    I'm really interested in the responses to this question as I'm increasingly seeing forward serrations as a popular customization - obstensibly for press checks - on all guns, 1911, glocks, XDs, even PPKs.
    If one uses the forward serrations to slightly draw the slide backwards, can you still call it a "press check"?

    I think that maneuver would need to be called a "push check (or pull, depending on the orientation of the hand)", in order to distinguish it from a true press check......

    PhilR.

  2. #22
    zhurdan's Avatar
    zhurdan is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    1,251
    I am of the mentality that handing loaded guns to people is a bad idea.
    1. If you are just showing it to someone, make it safe. Drop the mag and lock it back.
    2. If you are allowing someone to shoot it, teach them the function of the gun from mag insertion clear thru to firing and clearing, why start a lesson in the middle?
    3. If I set a gun down (no kids in my house) I assume any number of things could have happened to it if it were out of my site, I check the loaded chamber indicator on my Glock, then "press check" it using the rear serrations, and ensure return to battery. Keep in mind, I don't set my gun down just anywhere, but still I always check.

    One other thing to consider, when you do press check a weapon, it can pull a round forward in the magazine just enough to cause a potential issue, so I always drop the mag, reseat the round and reinsert the mag. I noticed this especially in my Kahr K98 Elite. This may sound like a bit much, but hell, if I have to depend on my gun working the first time everytime, I'm not going to give it any reason to malfunction.

    One time, I got pulled over in Utah for speeding (just a little) and I informed the Trooper that I had a permit and weapon. He asked that I hand it over while he conducts his stop. I asked if he minded if I cleared the weapon. When he asked why, I said "Because I never hand a loaded weapon to anyone." He about crapped his pants laughing. He said that was the first time anyone had ever said anything like that. He also said I probably wasn't the kind of person he needed to concern himself with. He gave me a smile and a wave and said "get outta here, and keep it under 90 please!"

    Zhur

  3. #23
    Old Padawan's Avatar
    Old Padawan is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Phoenix AZ
    Posts
    818
    I voted yes. I wear my pistol all day. I take it off, as I get ready for bed. I generally take it out of the holster and put it on the nightstand. When I get dressed the next day I put the holster on do a quick check and put it in the holster.
    I donít put my finger in front of the barrel of my 1911 (yikes), and I point the gun in a safe direction. I am forgetful. I may have unloaded it the night before for a dry practice, cleaning, other maintenance or any of many reasons. I am sure it is loaded when I check it.
    "Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it." -Mark Twain

  4. #24
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Arizona, baby!
    Posts
    5,081
    I don't take my pistol out of the holster. I take the whole kit and caboodle off my belt and put it in the night table drawer.

    I am also far too lazy to do much dry firing with pistols anymore.

    Doing an old-style press-check with a 1911 isn't as dangerous as it sounds at first blush. If you pinch thumb and forefinger together before you release the thumb safety, it's actually quite safe, since the slide comes out of battery the instant the safety comes off.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

    Donate to the Christian and Stephanie Nielson Recovery fund: http://www.nierecovery.com/.

    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  5. #25
    Mosquito's Avatar
    Mosquito is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    61
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    I don't press check. My carry gun is always loaded and I go on the assumption that my other guns are always hot as well. I figure it's safer to assume that the guns are always loaded than to try to remember what condition they are in. I don't ever rely on the chamber loaded indicator on my XD.
    Agreed.

    Also, in my XD .45acp the chamber loaded indicator can "stick" in the loaded position sometimes. I always assume any gun handed to me is loaded until I check it.

  6. #26
    ki4dmh's Avatar
    ki4dmh is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Young Harris Ga.
    Posts
    76
    I don't depend on the gadgets such as chamber indicators and peeps holes and whatever else. I always do a press check.

  7. #27
    MLB's Avatar
    MLB
    MLB is offline Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    Posts
    971
    It may be a fine point, but while a press check can be used to ensure a round is chambered, it isn't nearly sufficient to ensure the firearm is clear.

  8. #28
    DefiantSix's Avatar
    DefiantSix is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    7
    I press check, typically at the beginning and end of every day, because I believe in being responsible for every one of my rounds. I usually have my weapon within easy reach wherever I may be, but in places like my workplace, I transfer the pistol from it's holster to my briefcase, for safekeeping as well as increased discretion. Because there are times when I leave my desk without my briefcase, I check the magazine and the chamber to insure that all rounds are accounted for. I do the same thing, for the same reason when I get up in the morning, because although the drawer I keep the pistol in at night is literally right beneath my pillow, I have been asleep, and therefore cannot positively say that my weapon DIDN'T leave that drawer.

  9. #29
    1911 driver is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Aurora, Colorado
    Posts
    21

    press check

    Milquetoast,
    I have to take you to task on your comment "the most dangerous times with guns is when you are loading or unloading"... oh contraire...!! The most dangerous time is when you are presenting or re-holstering your weapon....everytime. Most ND's occur during these procedures. Chamber checking is a reasonably safe procedure.....unless one wants to shoot off a finger tip or two.

  10. #30
    MLB's Avatar
    MLB
    MLB is offline Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    Posts
    971
    I'd offer that they are equally dangerous, if you can't manage to keep your finger off of the trigger that is.

    A possible exception for owners of the Ruger SR9, dropping them may cause a ND they say. See recall info: http://www.ruger.com/SR9Recall/

  11. #31
    1911 driver is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Aurora, Colorado
    Posts
    21

    chamber checking

    Gentlemen,
    Statistics have proven that the most dangerous time while handling a handgun is when the operator is presenting his weapon or re-holstering it. Period..!! There is sufficent evidence to prove that many ND's occur simply because a shooter has NOT chamber checked his piece prior to his next procedure. With a regimen of dry practice and basically staying focused on proper gunhandling tecniques all these mysterious ND's will never happen. Take it to the bank.!

  12. #32
    michael P. is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    51
    I have two ways of checking the guns condition.

    1. I unload the gun and reload it.

    2. If I am too lazy to do this I get a flashlight and look down the barrel to see if a round is chambered.

  13. #33
    Todd is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by michael P. View Post
    2. If I am too lazy to do this I get a flashlight and look down the barrel to see if a round is chambered.
    In the name of God, tell me you are kidding.

  14. #34
    michael P. is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    51
    Yea I am. I use the flashlight method all of the time and not just when I am feeling lazy.

  15. #35
    Teuthis is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    442

    Presschecks

    No. I chamber the round and remember it. I have a drill so that I always know the status of my pistol, which, if I am carrying it, is loaded. Then there is no need to check it; especially when I am carrying it concealed.

    There is a "cycle time" after which one must unload, check and then reload the pistol. Then the process starts over.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    108
    I don't press check, but my (2) carry guns are always loaded and they are always in my custody and control. There is no one to tamper with them, so constantly fiddling around with them seems more dangerous. I will never hand a loaded gun to another person, no matter who they are, however.

  17. #37
    berettatoter's Avatar
    berettatoter is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,266
    No. I do a "pull" check.

  18. #38
    kg333's Avatar
    kg333 is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    717
    Voted yes, I usually do one when I take my gun out of its case to carry to ensure I have one in the chamber, and that it's the correct type of ammo. My JHPs are in a silver case, while the FMJs are a flat green. The CZ-82 doesn't have a chamber loaded indicator or I'd probably use that. I don't press check for unloading, that's a full rack to clear. For getting ready to carry, though, my reasons are similar to Zhurdan. It's been out of my sight, I should check it, and I want it to go "bang" instead of "click" if I need it.

    Quote Originally Posted by PhilR. View Post
    If you've ever seen what happens to a finger located just below the muzzle when a centerfire pistol goes off (how some press-check a 1911), then you will be cured of the habit. If you don't know what happens, take a piece of fruit along when you next go shooting. Rest the muzzle of your pistol on top of the tomato or whatever and let a round go.
    Not sure I follow what you mean...how in the world does one get a finger near the muzzle when holding a pistol normally? When I press-check, I hold the pistol as normal in a safe direction, make the same motions as to rack the slide, but don't pull it back more than a fraction of an inch. This allows me to look into the back of the chamber and see the back of the round. My finger is outside the trigger guard along the barrel as usual, but nowhere near the muzzle. I haven't heard the term "press check" before today, so whatever this is I'm doing might not be "press checking".

    KG

  19. #39
    Taketheshot is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1
    I agree with DefiantSix, when my gun is out of my sight for any length of time I always check to see if I have a round chambered. When I was a LEO, now retired, my partner and I arrested the subject of our investigation and as my partner was walking to get behind the guy I could see that his Model 19 was not loaded. After we took the subject to the lockup I asked my partner if his gun was loaded and he laughed and said of course it is. When he checked he couldn't believe it, he said his wife must have unloaded it for some reason but I really don't know what the actual story was but from that point on I always check.

  20. #40
    Packard is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Posts
    1,017
    I went to the gun store the other day and asked to see one of the Glocks that were in the display cabinet. The salesman handed it to me. The first thing I did when he handed it to me was point it in a save directiona and drop the magazine. Then I racked the slide a few times; pinky-checked the chamber and slapped the empty magazine in the gun. At that point I was ready to examine the gun. But before I had a chance to do so the salesman said, "Do you really think I would have handed you a loaded weapon?"

    And I said, "Nope."

    Any gun that has left my hands is "loaded" as far as I am concerned. Even at the range where I know everyone, if I put the weapon down and turn to talk to someone I will check the weapon when I pick it up. If it is out of my hands or out of my sight it is "loaded".

    I never make this sort of "press check". I know the condition of any weapon I have on my person. And since I live alone I don't need to worry about anyone fiddling with the weapon while I'm otherwise occupied.

    I vote "no" for a press check (but I'm glad I learned a new term.)

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

gun press check
,

handgun press check

,
how to press check a pistol
,
how to press check pistol
,

pistol press check

,
press check a pistol
,

press check gun

,
press check handgun
,

press check pistol

,
press-checking a gun
,
what is a press check
,
what is press checking a pistol
Click on a term to search for related topics.