Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Curious Relic

  1. #1
    Junior Member lewwallace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    63

    Curious Relic

    123
    Took some better pix of this rare transitional girl. She'a WEBLEY (455cf) circa 1884-5. Since I got her I've learned there only two others catalogued. One w/ser. no. In the 1200's and another four digits higher than mine. She has characteristics of Pryse, Wilkinson and WGs. The 'pundits' say her true historical background can't be established till others come to light for comparison. Enjoy her mysterious nature; I do!!
    20160206_102910-1.jpg20160206_103115.jpg20160206_103425.jpg20160206_103326.jpg

  2. #2
    Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    7,106
    If you keep this up, the Moderators will have to establish a Webley Area on the forum, after all.
    That'll make at least two members happy!

    I have a couple of questions-and-observations:

    1. I note this pistol's flush-fitted triggerguard, which differs from other "more modern" (Webley? Modern?) versions, which have what can only be called "stuck onto the surface with screws" triggerguards. I find it interesting that Webley & Sons didn't keep the flush-fitted triggerguard design, since it is much more comfortable to the hand of the shooter.

    2. I also note the knurled thumb screw on the left side of this pistol's barrel, and I wonder what it's for. Is it a means of removing the gun's cylinder? If one unscrews it, does that free the cylinder to be lifted off of its arbor (assuming an opened action, of course)?

    3. Further, I note a very small screw on the left side of the frame, near to, and parallel to, the pistol's barrel-pivot-retention screw. It seems to go all the way through the frame. What's it for?

    (While asking those questions in these words, I keep reminding myself of two word-emphasis gags from The Benny Hill Show: "What's that in the road? A head?" and "What is this thing called, love?")

    4. I note that you use this pistol, or one very like it, as your avatar on this forum. That leads me to assume that it is "the queen of your collection." Is that true?

  3. #3
    Junior Member lewwallace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    63
    Very astute observations Steve! Since this a only 3 of, the 'aberations' such as the trigger guard remain unanswered, one would guess its using mixed left over parts(Pryse, Wilkinson, Kaufman) The knurled knob is indeed he cylinder release, particular to the Webley No.4
    Pryse models. The small screw near the hinge is an auxiliary catch for the ejector lever(internal) last used on the 1886 model WG (the gun in my avatar pic). Lastly...yeah she was the "Queen" but there's been some others that are pretenders to the throne!! Ergo! 1905 W&S Target Model and pre-RIC Second Pattern, foliate engraved!
    Screenshot_2015-08-06-10-44-04-1.jpgScreenshot_2015-12-06-10-23-26-1-1.jpg

  4. #4
    Junior Member lewwallace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    63

  5. #5
    Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    7,106
    Ivory grip.
    Fully engraved. Maybe plated.
    Pocket-size.
    What's not to like?
    (Well, maybe it's a mere .32?)

    I bet that Dr. Watson carried one of these, on his exploits with Holmes.

  6. #6
    Junior Member lewwallace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    Ivory grip.
    Fully engraved. Maybe plated.
    Pocket-size.
    What's not to like?
    (Well, maybe it's a mere .32?)

    I bet that Dr. Watson carried one of these, on his exploits with Holmes.
    Nope to. 32, .442!! 210gr soft cast hollow base bullets over 12gr BP! 44spl cut-down brass.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bisley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    2,189
    I wonder how many of these made it into the old west, or at least into the country during 'old west' times. The Webley is by no means beautiful (to me), but definitely a fine weapon for self defense or military. No doubt, the Schofield was influenced heavily by it, and there seemed to be quite a few of them in circulation.

  8. #8
    Junior Member lewwallace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    63
    A ton of Bulldogs made their way out west! Forehand and Wadsworth (Liege Belgium too)copied them and they were a favorite of many a westernly expanding folk because of their size. Most Webs went to Aust., Afr., and India to support her Majesty's colonists, so very few are noted in the Cowboy Days!

  9. #9
    pic
    pic is offline
    Supporting Member HGF Gold Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    2,864
    Quote Originally Posted by lewwallace View Post
    Nice guns, I see the word "BULL DOG" engraved..I own a charter arms "bull dog".

    You think Webley could have come up with a more original name, lol.

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •