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  1. #1
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    Hopkins and Allen XL no model number

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    Unfortuntley my great grandfather passed away and he let me have this old revolver and it seems to be in mint condition I just don't know what it is exactly there's no model number there's no nothing going to go on by. My great grandfather passed away and he let me have this old revolver and it seems to be in mint condition I just don't know what it is exactly there's no model number there's no nothing big going to go on by. It's a beautiful gone and I just don't know what brown it but ro it's a beautiful gone and I just don't know what round it's chambered in, I tried looking up online but most of the Hopkins around guns they have model numbers on this one doesn't it just says XL double action Hopkins and Alan arms c2 Norwich Connecticut USA.

    I can't really find anything on the Internet that looks like it nothing matches what this guy looks like I'm not sure if it's like a special I do remember my great-grandfather saying that that one of our relatives actually worked in a factory and made the revolver image.jpegimage.jpegimage.jpegimage.jpegimage.jpeg pictures included

  2. #2
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    Anyone??

  3. #3
    Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Hopkins and Allen made a whole line of inexpensive "Saturday-night specials." Yours is one of them.
    Many, if not most, of them were cheaply nickle plated.

    Your pistol appears to be broken, in that it seems from the pictures that its double-action mechanism isn't working.
    If it were working, its trigger would pivot forward after its hammer had fallen into the "fired" position. (See picture #3.)
    I suspect that its trigger return spring is either broken or missing. It's an easy job to replace it, but it will be almost impossible to find the replacement part.

    If you have the means to do so, carefully measure the inside diameter of both a cylinder chamber-mouth and the barrel muzzle.
    If those measurements are approximately 11/32" and 5/16", your pistol fires the .32 S&W cartridge.
    If those measurements are approximately 7/16" and 3/8", your pistol fires the .38 S&W cartridge.

    Your pistol is NOT SAFE to fire modern ammunition. Do not shoot it.

  4. #4
    Junior Member Gabby's Avatar
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    Lots of information here, I don't know what kind of search you did but Google popped this right up first try. Take a look it looks like there is lots of information on it.
    Gabby

    https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...+double+action

    Yeah Steve Cheap and "Saturday night special" came to mind but this was probably made before the term became popular.
    I didn't want to hurt his feelings either. OH well.

    Take a look here especially the "parts gun" listing and look close to see how many bids are being made on all of the listings , it doesn't seem to be pulling in lots of interest or money.
    The gun probably isn't worth fixing.
    http://www.gunbroker.com/All/BI.aspx...pkins+allen+XL

  5. #5
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    Thanks for all the responses. I don't know much about revolvers but what I meant is I can't find. Single pistol that looks identical rot every detail. Even the 32 models. You may not notice it in the pictures but there's minor and some major difference. I assume it's a 38 due to the fact a 38 special almost fits. As the double action I think you're right. I pill the hammer back, shoots. Rotates successfully, slightly nudge trigger front then it shoots fine like its a double. Or I can cock the hammer back slightly and can fire fast.

    The barrel on the inside is beautiful no pitting, no rust nothing. Rotates smoothly. Why's this gun unsafe to fire exactly? Is it because it used to be loaded with Blackpowder around rather than smoke with us or do you notice something else?

    In my opinion it's worth the money to fix since its been in the family since its birth. You can't beat that. In my opinion that's priceless. Money isn't an issue for me, I don't like saying it but I've got lots of spare cash to spend. Money means nothing to me. Was thinking of getting it engraved nicely in memory of my ancestors that died of cancer and sadly homicide. Gun means a lot to me, he gave it to me on this day of his death...

    Thanks guys and no feelings are hurt. Although a buddy of mine loved it and wanted to trade his 40 carabine for it. He loves rhe feel and the condition. I believe the carabine I googled was worth 700ish, but I think I'll pass. Can't put a price on family heeilooms..

  6. #6
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    Sorry for the double post, what exactly ammo can it fire as you say not mordern. Want to try to edit a post unfortunately give me some sort of error but yeah I really like the feeling I just really like it. I used to think hated revolvers for some reason I really really like them now.. I'm really good at machinery so maybe I can make up my own spring but I don't know how complicated the mechanism is uncle let you guys know. I also apologize for any typing errors I am multiple sclerosis so I do apologize. The gun doesn't seem to be made from a cheap nickel. I'm not even sure it is, work with a lot of metal and it doesn't seem quite cheap.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Your antique pistol was made to fire low-pressure, black-powder cartridges.
    Modern cartridges are loaded with smokeless powder to similar pressure levels, but...
    Smokeless powder gas rises to its pressure level much more quickly that does black powder. It is that quick rise in pressure which will eventually cause your gun to blow up in your hand.

    Since it is a family heirloom, I strongly suggest asking an experienced gunsmith to replace the broken or missing spring.
    It will be a little expensive, but, considering its history, the cost might be worth it to you.

    I have replaced parts in guns like yours: It isn't a job for the faint-of-heart or the inexperienced: Lots of little puzzle pieces inside.

  8. #8
    Junior Member Gabby's Avatar
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    By all means if you feel that much for it do what feels right just find a GOOD gunsmith to do the work and recommend a GOOD engraver when you get around to that. I'm sure if you find the right people to deal with they will put you in touch with a GOOD plating facility as well.
    Don't just take your gun to any old plating facility as they may not protect the working parts and plate where it isn't supposed to be and plug up places where parts are supposed to fit mainly because they won't know about it. Ignorance can be costly. Even if you do have "buckets" of money! Some of those oopsies might even be impossible to correct. Have a nice display case made for it with a short history label and display it for your friends and family to see when you have special occasions.
    Gabby

  9. #9
    Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    If you want it engraved, you'll have to have the plating stripped off first.
    Let the gunsmith handle getting that job done, too, since the pistol will need to be completely disassembled.

    I suggest against engraving.

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