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Thread: 1926 Enfield

  1. #1
    RavenStandsAlone is offline Junior Member
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    1926 Enfield

    I have recently come across a .38 caliber 6 shot revolver stamped Enfield 1926. The owner may want to put this piece in an estate auction. Does anyone know how to go about ascertaining the value of a particular piece.

    If it's only worth 20 bucks, why bother? If it is worth more it will give us an idea of where the starting bid should be to a knowledgeable bidder.


    Thanks,

    Raven

  2. #2
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Without a photo and some more information about its markings, it's hard to tell you anything.

    You possibly have a Webley Mark VI, but it could also be a Webley Mark IV, or an Enfield No. 2, Mark I or Mark I*. All of these were .38 caliber (and will use the .38 S&W cartridge).
    (The Webley Mark IV was made from 1892 through maybe 1932; the Webley VI was made from 1913 until maybe 1939, and some were made by Enfield; the Enfield No. 2, Mark I was made from 1936 until maybe 1957; and the Enfield No. 2, Mark I* was made from about 1942 through maybe 1957.)
    Price will vary according to the pistol's type and condition. Some Webleys could be worth as much as $1,000.00, and as little as $150.00. The Enfields run from $350.00 to $100.00.

    This information comes from The Standard Catalog of Firearms, 2010; and The Standard Catalog of Military Firearms, 5th Edition, 2009.

  3. #3
    RavenStandsAlone is offline Junior Member
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    Enfield No. 2 Mark 1 is the weapon I have. Condition is good. Grips are darkened but unchipped. Surface is unscarred but with some surface corrosion which should clean off easily, no pitting. Mechanism is smooth and solid with no slop anywhere. I will put a picture of it up shortly but that is the baseline.

    Thank you for your prompt response.

    Raven

  4. #4
    RavenStandsAlone is offline Junior Member
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    Smile

    This piece has the word "Enfield" above a little crown thingie and then to the left of the crown MK and to the right of the crown VI and below the crown the numbers 1926.

    On the frame just in front of the trigger guard are the figures: A9765 and the cylinder has the same nuimber stamped on it.

    Condition is good.

    Grips are darkened but unchipped.

    Surface is unscarred but with some surface corrosion which should clean off easily, no pitting.

    Mechanism is smooth and solid with no slop anywhere.
    Last edited by RavenStandsAlone; 08-13-2010 at 03:27 PM. Reason: Additional information

  5. #5
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    You have an Enfield-made, Webley Mark VI revolver.
    It's worth at least $500.00, and may be in good enough condition to be worth considerably more (maybe as much as $800.00).
    Because it's Enfield-made, it may be somewhat rare, which would raise its price even higher ($1,000.00?).
    Because of those facts, the best way to sell it, I think, would be at auction in the hands of an auctioneer who knows what it is. (I have had very good luck selling a widow's guns at auction, but have seen a supposedly-honest gun dealer severely underpay another widow for hers.)

    The "little crown thingie" is the proofmark, I believe (but don't know for sure, since I haven't seen it). The "A"-number is its serial number, and it's good that the cylinder has the same number. Somewhere on the pistol, there might be a British "broad arrow" mark, denoting government ownership: it's a wide upside-down "V" with a short vertical line down its middle. (If it isn't there, the gun was privately purchased and owned.)

    Clean off any rust with a piece of cotton cloth (a canvas cleaning patch is good) and some oil. Clean the bore and the chambers, too. Do not use any kind of abrasive or "polish." Not even steel wool. Not anywhere!
    Do not try to re-blue any part, either.
    After removing as much rust as you can, oil it and leave it alone.

  6. #6
    RavenStandsAlone is offline Junior Member
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    Thank you Steve. Very informative. It has the symbol you described on the left side of the hammer. Does that add, subtract or make no difference to the value?

    Raven

  7. #7
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    I dunno.
    My source-books only say that there's a difference between "war-finished" (dull) and blued (polished) samples, but that either version could have been purchased by the government.
    Polished guns are worth more than dull ones.

    If you choose to sell at auction, one would expect the auction house to have knowledgeable appraisers at hand, and that a fair reserve- or starting-price would be set by them.
    They'll know more than I do.

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