Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    sunnyside is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1

    Revolvers in a fire

    I've loaded some revolvers in a gunsafe under my bead in order to protect against the unlikely occurance of a home invasion that I hope never happens.

    However I've become concerned about another unlikely occurance that I hope never happens; my house catching on fire. I don't want my guns to be a threat to my family or fire fighters.

    I've got a .45 ACP and a .357 mag. I currently don't have a round lined up with the barrel, as I wouldn't trust the safe against that given what I currently know. Does anyone have any information about penetration of steel plate from various rounds?

    But what about the other rounds? The frame obscures the other rounds, but I figure the first one that cooks off might rip the barrel and frame off, or pop the cylinder out.

    Do you think rounds cooking off in a cylinder could be any threat to a few millimeters of steel?

    What about loose rounds? I'm storing other pistol rounds in their packaging inside a locked file cabinet.

  2. #2
    pic's Avatar
    pic
    pic is offline Senior Member HGF Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Upstate,N.Y.
    Posts
    1,372
    Quote Originally Posted by sunnyside View Post
    I've loaded some revolvers in a gunsafe under my bead in order to protect against the unlikely occurance of a home invasion that I hope never happens.

    However I've become concerned about another unlikely occurance that I hope never happens; my house catching on fire. I don't want my guns to be a threat to my family or fire fighters.

    I've got a .45 ACP and a .357 mag. I currently don't have a round lined up with the barrel, as I wouldn't trust the safe against that given what I currently know. Does anyone have any information about penetration of steel plate from various rounds?

    But what about the other rounds? The frame obscures the other rounds, but I figure the first one that cooks off might rip the barrel and frame off, or pop the cylinder out.

    Do you think rounds cooking off in a cylinder could be any threat to a few millimeters of steel?

    What about loose rounds? I'm storing other pistol rounds in their packaging inside a locked file cabinet.
    Good question .Tell the firemen where your live ammo is located, even though they are already properly trained . The information would be useful.
    I would 'nt worry about your family being in danger of ammo going off due to the heat of the fire , the amount of heat needed to ignite the rounds , you would already have left the house. The velocity of a loose round not chambered will not have the velocity obviously, but could still be very dangerous and unpredictable. I would think the brass becomes more of the moving projectile of the two pieces , the brass being the lighter of the two in weight then the bullet.
    But any how this is my own opinion without google's help lol. Google those questions and see what comes up..
    In case of a fire get your family out safely, then go retrieve your guns. Even if your life depends on it and there is only a 50/50 chance of your survival. Throw them out the window just in case you perish in the fire. I will buy them . The money would come in handy. And if you survive, You never know what ratty hotel you might be staying at after the fire and might be needing the guns to save your family again.


    NOTE; just kidding about the last paragraph, sort of

  3. #3
    Ruger71's Avatar
    Ruger71 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Mssouri
    Posts
    123
    I don't know anything about firefighting, so I don't know at what point they would leave and just let it go. As for yourself and family, I would think that you would be out of the house, or the fire would already have claimed your life by the time the rounds got hot enough to go off. As for live rounds, yes, the brass is what would be flying around aimlessly.

  4. #4
    MLB's Avatar
    MLB
    MLB is offline Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    Posts
    971
    The first video seems to address how a few mm of sheet metal hold up against most rounds (not well)

    YouTube - Mythbusters shooting oven door

    the second vid addresses the "baking" issue.

    YouTube - Mythbusters - Bullets exploding inside an oven

    I love Mythbusters...

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •