Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Teuthis is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    442

    The Reliable Revolver

    I read constantly in this and other forums of modern semi-auto pistols' failures to feed, jamming, breaking, being recalled; and myriads of aggravated complaints. There are manufacturers everywhere, pumping out ill-conceived designs that seem to require constant tweaking recalling, and changing; and that support an incredibly large aftermarket just to make these modern marvels work properly. And most of them are plastic.

    Revolvers, solid, lasting weapons, are being overlooked by new handgunners who are mesmerized by high-tech competitors making almost identical weapons and touting their minor differences with skilled marketing efforts.

    I recommend to all of those complaining, unsatisfied and unknowledgeable customers, the reliable and long-proven revolver. Ruger, Smith and Wesson, and some others, make sturdy, powerful, graceful, and sometimes, very concealable handguns, that do not jam or break under the most rigorous conditions. They do not have slides to oil, or magazines to foul or springs that wear out from cycling. You load your six, and you always get what you paid for.

    Revolvers excel in calibers from .22 long rifle to Smith and Wesson 500. They can fill every handgun requirement with rugged, unfailing certainty. I know some people want 17 rounds in the handle, but for almost any purpose that is, in my opinion, mostly paranoia; much of it created by the firearms manufacturers, gun magazine writers and self-proclaimed demigods.

    So have your plastic and your alloys and your slides and springs and problems. But by all means, look into having at least one revolver in your arsenal. Better yet, melt that Glock down into an ashtray and get yourself a real chunk of iron, or two or three, in .357 or .44 or .45. There's nothing wrong with a 38 Special either. They are fine defensive handguns, and some of the best concealable weapons you can have.

  2. #2
    mccoy's Avatar
    mccoy is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Italy, ole Europe
    Posts
    204
    You load your six...
    I'd just like to remind that you can load up to eight rounds in .357 now, and very quickly if held together by moonclips.

    Some revos, like the S&W 627 PC (mine ) have such capability.

    My first handgun, bought about one year ago, has been a revolver, I've seen and shot a few semiautos since then, I still believe mien has been a very good choice, and I still don't see a potential rival to my 627 for target shooting and home defense (unless, maybe, a 629 PC 'light hunter in .44 mag ).

  3. #3
    texgunner's Avatar
    texgunner is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by Teuthis View Post
    I read constantly in this and other forums of modern semi-auto pistols' failures to feed, jamming, breaking, being recalled; and myriads of aggravated complaints. There are manufacturers everywhere, pumping out ill-conceived designs that seem to require constant tweaking recalling, and changing; and that support an incredibly large aftermarket just to make these modern marvels work properly. And most of them are plastic.

    Revolvers, solid, lasting weapons, are being overlooked by new handgunners who are mesmerized by high-tech competitors making almost identical weapons and touting their minor differences with skilled marketing efforts.

    I recommend to all of those complaining, unsatisfied and unknowledgeable customers, the reliable and long-proven revolver. Ruger, Smith and Wesson, and some others, make sturdy, powerful, graceful, and sometimes, very concealable handguns, that do not jam or break under the most rigorous conditions. They do not have slides to oil, or magazines to foul or springs that wear out from cycling. You load your six, and you always get what you paid for.

    Revolvers excel in calibers from .22 long rifle to Smith and Wesson 500. They can fill every handgun requirement with rugged, unfailing certainty. I know some people want 17 rounds in the handle, but for almost any purpose that is, in my opinion, mostly paranoia; much of it created by the firearms manufacturers, gun magazine writers and self-proclaimed demigods.

    So have your plastic and your alloys and your slides and springs and problems. But by all means, look into having at least one revolver in your arsenal. Better yet, melt that Glock down into an ashtray and get yourself a real chunk of iron, or two or three, in .357 or .44 or .45. There's nothing wrong with a 38 Special either. They are fine defensive handguns, and some of the best concealable weapons you can have.
    +1

    I like your logic.

    Tex

  4. #4
    niadhf's Avatar
    niadhf is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Rural New York
    Posts
    1,196
    Teuthis,
    Not arguments from me, and not just for new handgunners either. My Autos have finally surpassed my revolvers in number, but not by much, or probably for long. Deciding on a Kel-tec P3AT or Ruger SP101 in .327 for my next handgun.

  5. #5
    Bob Wright's Avatar
    Bob Wright is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    1,546
    My very first handgun was a revolver, a Colt New Service in .45 Colt, bought nearly fifty-five years ago. I'm still a revolver man. I'm not inexperienced with the auto pistols, but for my needs, the sixgun fits my needs.

    I've shot NRA bullseye, long range handgun, hunted game, and kilt many a can or clay pidgeon.

    Still suits me.

    Bob Wright

  6. #6
    DrSharkey is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    54

    Wink waiting for Ruger

    I'm new to handguns, and would love to get the Ruger sp101 for the .327, but nobody in my area seems to be able to get their hands on one.

    I know this question will bring on tons of opinions, but what would be a great, first revolver? I have a Taurus 9mm PT111 Mill Pro right now, and I am pleased with it, but I'd love to get a revolver.

  7. #7
    Dsig1's Avatar
    Dsig1 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    687
    I bought an SP 101 3" as my first gun. The salesman basically repeated what Teuthis posted here. I no longer have that SP 101 but I'll always have more than a few wheel guns in my collection.

    Currently:

    S&W Model 14 4" .22
    S&W Model 19 6" .357
    Colt Agent 2" .38
    Ruger Security Six 6" .357

  8. #8
    Teuthis is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    442
    The revolver you are seeking is a good one. Anything from Ruger is excellent. I am not aware of the level of commercial success of the .327 magnum. If one is somewhat conservative with regards to the long term availibility of the .327, one might consider a .357 instead. There are +P 38 Special rounds that might approximate the .327. Plus you have the ability to shoot .357 rounds if you go into the field. The SP101 is chambered for the .357 Magnum and shoots those rounds well.

    I have found over the years that it is best by far to have patience and find what you really want, instead of making a compromise that you will regret. Good luck choosing!

  9. #9
    Rainmaker is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2
    I'm going to buy my first handgun this week, and it's going to be a revolver. The local sporting goods store has a used S&W Model 29 and it's likely going to be mine...the anticipation is killing me!

  10. #10
    khegglie's Avatar
    khegglie is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Nutmeg state
    Posts
    83
    Be careful! Revolvers fail too. My Rossi .44spl broke the firing pin while dry firing over snap caps! All click....no bang.
    I'm carrying TWO all the time now.

  11. #11
    Teuthis is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    442
    The Model 29 is a great handgun. Congrats. I have never had a Smith and Wesson or Ruger fail in any way. I am not so familiar with Rossi. Perhaps they have an issue with firing pins. Good luck with it!

  12. #12
    Desertrat's Avatar
    Desertrat is offline Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tempe, AZ
    Posts
    156
    Couldn't agree more........

  13. #13
    Ogre's Avatar
    Ogre is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Johnson County, Texas
    Posts
    24

    I like it

    Quote Originally Posted by Teuthis View Post
    I read constantly in this and other forums of modern semi-auto pistols' failures to feed, jamming, breaking, being recalled; and myriads of aggravated complaints. There are manufacturers everywhere, pumping out ill-conceived designs that seem to require constant tweaking recalling, and changing; and that support an incredibly large aftermarket just to make these modern marvels work properly. And most of them are plastic.

    Revolvers, solid, lasting weapons, are being overlooked by new handgunners who are mesmerized by high-tech competitors making almost identical weapons and touting their minor differences with skilled marketing efforts.

    I recommend to all of those complaining, unsatisfied and unknowledgeable customers, the reliable and long-proven revolver. Ruger, Smith and Wesson, and some others, make sturdy, powerful, graceful, and sometimes, very concealable handguns, that do not jam or break under the most rigorous conditions. They do not have slides to oil, or magazines to foul or springs that wear out from cycling. You load your six, and you always get what you paid for.

    Revolvers excel in calibers from .22 long rifle to Smith and Wesson 500. They can fill every handgun requirement with rugged, unfailing certainty. I know some people want 17 rounds in the handle, but for almost any purpose that is, in my opinion, mostly paranoia; much of it created by the firearms manufacturers, gun magazine writers and self-proclaimed demigods.

    So have your plastic and your alloys and your slides and springs and problems. But by all means, look into having at least one revolver in your arsenal. Better yet, melt that Glock down into an ashtray and get yourself a real chunk of iron, or two or three, in .357 or .44 or .45. There's nothing wrong with a 38 Special either. They are fine defensive handguns, and some of the best concealable weapons you can have.
    I'm new here, and I came across this old posting by Teuthis when I was reading back posts. I really like how he thinks because I've always preferred revolvers over autos, even before my age put me into a federally protected class (since we all know that only old geezers are revolver guys - just ask the gun shop commandos out there). (Sadly, I agree w/Teuthis that gunshop commandos are buying huge capacity, large-bore autos out of paranoia).

    Not so long ago I got my CCL, and went w/a Bersa .380 (BT380) becuase I wanted something relatively inexpensive, small, and concealable and because an automatic made for a better choice on the CCL test range. The Bersa has performed its intended role very well, and I'd consider another Bersa if I was on the hunt for another auto. But I'm really not anymore.

    I had a Chief's Special for quite a while, but I gave it to a friend's son as a gift when he graduated from a local police academy. He loves it. I later replaced it with a Taurus 85CH Ultra-Lite. It's a good weapon, but I still prefer the S&W. Anyway, when I began to carry both the BT380 and the 85CH on a regular basis, I quickly came to appreciate just how much better the 85CH was when it came to front trouser poacket carry. It just conceals and deploys much better than the BT380 (or any iother comparibly sized auto).

    I've thought about some of the mouseguns as a solution to the concealability/ease of deployment issue, but they're too small for my big hands, and the jamming/FTF/FTE issues just don't leave me with a warm fuzzy. Again, I think the time proven snubby (Ruger, S&W, or Taurus) wins out.

    I gotta agree with Teuthis, the revolver is still the king. My next purchase is gonna be either a S&W Bodyguard or a SP101, .357, w/3" barrel (I figure that latter would carry well in a Crossbreed holster).

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

are taurus guns reliable
,
are38 revolver taurus pistols reliable
,
most reliable revolver
,
reliable 6 shot revolver
,
reliable compact .22 revolver
,

reliable revolver

,

reliable revolver handgun

,

reliable revolvers

,
smith and wesson 38 special plus p ultralite
,
what does 85ch mean
,
what year make and model revolver is the most reliable
,
who makes the most reliable revolvers
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1