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  1. #1
    bwanatom's Avatar
    bwanatom is offline Junior Member
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    Revolver recommendation

    Hi,
    I have really been enjoying my new beretta M9 hg. It has been a real enjoyment shooting at the range, and that is the main reason I bought a hg. Just the same, I am looking for some recommendations on a "revolver" purchase. This purchase will come next year, I hope, allowing me to have something to look forward to, and research. Some of the specs I know I will want are:
    1) Primarily for range use, possibly for light competition.
    2) I want a long barrel (6"-8")
    3) 99% sure that I would choose a .357 mag/38
    4) High quality/reliable
    5) Sharp looking (not many hg's aren't)
    *) I don't like the # 6 (unlucky),so I'll jump to #7 (just kidd'n)
    7) A revolver known to be accurate (moreso than others)

    I would appreciate your comments as to which revolver you would recommend to me.

    thanks for replying, tom

  2. #2
    Dsig1's Avatar
    Dsig1 is offline Member
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    My finest shooting gun is my Smith and Wesson Model 19 6". The more modern version of this gun is the SS 686 but since you want to avoid the number 6, the Model 19 would suit your needs. Easy shooting with .38 rounds and extremely accurate. This target is my first sub 2" group ever, shot off hand at 20 yards. My Kimber TLE is a close second to this gun but this wheel gun is just a fun day at the range, waiting to happen. Good luck with your selection but you won't go wrong with one of these older Smiths.



  3. #3
    bwanatom's Avatar
    bwanatom is offline Junior Member
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    great shooting, maybe someday for me?
    I actually have been looking at the s/w 686 model.
    does it come ported in .357 ?
    I have also considered the Taurus, wow it's neat looking, but what about quality and resale value? Love it's price and looks.
    thanks, tom

  4. #4
    Dsig1's Avatar
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    I'd stay with the 686 instead of the Taurus. You will be able to find some unfavorable discussion threads on Taurus revolvers in this forum which cite specifics so you're not just reading reports from some jaded guys or loyalists from other brands. 686's do come ported but in a 6" gun weighing nearly or over 2 pounds, you really won't need it and the porting will probably add $100 to the cost. A 686 6" will have lighter recoil than a poly 9mm when you shoot .38 target loads with it. Even when I shoot .357 through my Model 19, there is more bang than kick out of the loads. Also, the porting flash and residue can actually make you less effective in competitive shooting.


    This link is to an auction for a ported 6"
    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=118317968

    This link is to a "no reserve" auction for a nice, used 686. This should give you a good indication of market price at the end of the auction.
    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=117418766

  5. #5
    Ptarmigan is offline Member
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    Without question my recommendation is the Smith & Wesson model 686. It meets all your wants/needs.

  6. #6
    bwanatom's Avatar
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    Pt,
    the s/w 686 is probably the front runner right now. To own a S&W 357 mag really sounds right.
    I do have a question pertaining to safety, which is very important to me:
    Can you get a revolver with some sort of "safety" on it ? I know the common sense safety rules (but never take them for granted), and keep reminding myself of them, but being a "range" purchase, a safety would be desirable to me.
    thank you

  7. #7
    bruce333's Avatar
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    Seem pretty safe to me. Open the cylinder and they can't fire.

    When I'm at the range the cylinder stays open until I'm ready to load and start shooting. In other words, if I don't have a firing grip on the gun the cylinder is open.

    I really don't see the need for a safety on any range only gun. You aren't carrying it around loaded when at the range. The only time rounds should be chambered at the range is when you are at the firing line and the range is hot. I don't ever set a gun down at the range unless the action is open and I've checked it to be sure it's clear.
    Bruce, Life Member: NRA, NCRPA, GRNC, GOA

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  8. #8
    Ptarmigan is offline Member
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    Bruce covered it very well. I am not aware of any modern revolver with a manual safety. The newer revolvers, including the S&Ws, are built so that they will not fire if dropped. The long double action trigger pull would be very, very hard to "defeat" by accident.

  9. #9
    hberttmank's Avatar
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    The S&W 686 would be a good choice, also take a look at the Ruger GP100.

  10. #10
    bwanatom's Avatar
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    I understand what you guys are saying, and I take very seriously the basic safety rules that one should "always" abide by. Just he same, I personally would love to see a decocking mechanism on a revolver. If I did not complete a full cylinder of shooting, you would have to admit it would be easier, and safer to uncock the gun with the decocker. The way it is now, you have to make sure your thumb is on the hammer while you pull the trigger easing the hammer down. This feature is one the main reasons I purchased the Beretta M9.
    thanks

  11. #11
    BeefyBeefo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bwanatom View Post
    I understand what you guys are saying, and I take very seriously the basic safety rules that one should "always" abide by. Just he same, I personally would love to see a decocking mechanism on a revolver. If I did not complete a full cylinder of shooting, you would have to admit it would be easier, and safer to uncock the gun with the decocker. The way it is now, you have to make sure your thumb is on the hammer while you pull the trigger easing the hammer down. This feature is one the main reasons I purchased the Beretta M9.
    thanks
    In revolvers, the hammer isn't cocked, unless you cocked it or are pulling the trigger (am I missing something?). Either way, if you cocked the hammer and wanted to let it down, can't you just swing the cylinder out and lower the hammer? I'm not a revolver buff...

    -Jeff-

  12. #12
    bwanatom's Avatar
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    that's an interesting question jeff, I am not that experienced either with revolver. I am trying to learn as much as I can before I purchase one. My point is this: My beretta's decocking mechanism not only uncocks the trigger, but renders the gun inoperable. I'll admit, this may be an inconvenience for personal safety, as each individual has their own preference, but the less action a person does to decock a gun, the safer I would think it would be.
    thanks

    ain't this a beauty!

  13. #13
    Ptarmigan is offline Member
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    The hammer is only cocked if you cock it. If you do not cock the hammer, you shoot double action i.e. a pull of the trigger cocks and fires the weapon. If you want to shoot single action, you must cock the hammer for each shot. It is not possible to open the cylinder with the hammer cock on a double action revolver.

    A double action revolver is one of the safest handguns around in my opinion,, but it is good that you worry about gun safety and ask questions.

  14. #14
    bwanatom's Avatar
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    thanks Pt,
    I guess the scenerio I am thinking about is this: You cock the trigger with a full cylinder, then change your mind, and don't want to fire. This could happern at the range, or at home while realizing the threat has neutralized itself. Maybe I'm "chasing my own tail" so to speak, but that is the type of situation that concerns me. If I am in that situation, my point is that a decocking mechanism would be the easiest way to go (at least as far as I can tell).
    thanks
    (Leading candidate)
    Smith & Wesson 686P .357 Mag 6", 7 round

  15. #15
    Ptarmigan is offline Member
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    I hear what you are saying, and like I wrote before, it is a good thing that you ask these questions. In my opinion, if you have the weapon pointed at someone, you should not cock the hammer. Double action for defense, single action for the range. Also, if you cock the hammer for a single action shot at the range, you need to point the weapon downrange anyway when you decock. You should practice decocking with an empty weapon and you will quickly realize that this is a non-issue. Decocking a revolver is a very simple task.

  16. #16
    bwanatom's Avatar
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    thank you Pt,
    your responses, as well as others, have really helped.
    tom

  17. #17
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    Hey, I learned something too. I had no idea you couldn't swing out the cylinder with the hammer cocked. Thanks, Ptarmigan.

    -Jeff-

  18. #18
    Ptarmigan is offline Member
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    I am glad we could help. The very first handgun I ever shot was a Smith & Wesson K frame and it was my first duty weapon. I learned how to shoot with a double action revolver and it (the skill and the revolver) served me well down the road.

    If you want to get really excited about revolver shooting check out Bill Jordan's book No Second Place Winner. It is from 1965 but offers a ton of great information, and motivation.

  19. #19
    jeb21 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by hberttmank View Post
    The S&W 686 would be a good choice, also take a look at the Ruger GP100.

    +1. If you plan on shooting a steady diet of magnums, then the GP100 would be my first choice hands down. Between its weight and the great grips the weapon really soaks up the magnum recoil.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeb21 View Post
    +1. If you plan on shooting a steady diet of magnums, then the GP100 would be my first choice hands down. Between its weight and the great grips the weapon really soaks up the magnum recoil.
    +2

    I love my GP 100.

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