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  1. #1
    Bowhunter57's Avatar
    Bowhunter57 is offline Junior Member
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    Uberti 1875 Army Outlaw - Frontier?

    Has anyone owned or shot one of these revolvers?
    www.uberti.com/firearms/OutlawFrontierPolice.tpl

    I'm considering the purchase of one of these revolvers and I intend to reload for it and hunt varmints with it. I would like to hear from others to learn about the accuracy of this handgun.

    Your opinions and experiences are appreciated.
    Thank you, Bowhunter57

  2. #2
    teknoid's Avatar
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    I haven't shot that exact model, but have a Uberti Cattleman, in .45. It has caused some serious head scratching at the range. Some find it hard to believe it out shoots their similar revolvers and costs less than half as much. Even when I let them shoot it to prove it's not just me. That sucker is a tack driver.

  3. #3
    Baldy's Avatar
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    Never owned one but they sure are sharp.

  4. #4
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    teknoid,
    If you don't mind saying....Where did you purchase your Uberti?
    The best price that I can find on the Frontier is $447, which isn't bad.

    I intend to purchase this handgun in .357 Mag. caliber, as I'm more familar with it and have never owned a 45LC. It was my thoughts to load up some .38 Special loads of semi-wadcutters or wadcutters with a mild charge that would be accurate and still be deadly enough to put a knot on the noggin' of a groundhog.

    Do you have any thoughts on 45LC vs. .38 Spl./.357 Mag.?

    Good hunting, Bowhunter57

  5. #5
    Bob Wright's Avatar
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    I've not had any experience with the Uberti, but did some shooting with an original 1890 Remington Army. These guns have historically correct sights, which aren't the best for hunting use. If you are serious about handgun hunting, I'd advise a Ruger Blackhawk in your choice of cartridges. The Ruger single action is one rugged gun, and has finely adjustable sights for more precise shot placement. And shot placement is of utmost importance for clean, humane kills.

    Bob Wright

    I re-read your post about groundhog hunting. From my experience, shots are made from twenty-five to one hundred yards on these critters. I'd stick to fast stepping .357 Magnum cartridges. I've used the .44 Magnum, which I prefer for just about anything. And, I'd stay in the nominal to heavy bullet range, as the lightweights seem to loose speed over distances. And, the heavier slug bucks the wind better.

  6. #6
    Bowhunter57's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Wright
    I've not had any experience with the Uberti, but did some shooting with an original 1890 Remington Army. These guns have historically correct sights, which aren't the best for hunting use. If you are serious about handgun hunting, I'd advise a Ruger Blackhawk in your choice of cartridges. The Ruger single action is one rugged gun, and has finely adjustable sights for more precise shot placement. And shot placement is of utmost importance for clean, humane kills.
    Bob Wright,
    Thank you, for your reply.
    I agree with you, on the sights and shot placement. Even though the Uberti Cattleman has fixed sights, they're very fine or well defined. From the owners of the Cattleman, that I've been in contact with, they tell me that this revolver shoots very straight, but loads determine the high or low point of impact.


    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Wright
    I re-read your post about groundhog hunting. From my experience, shots are made from twenty-five to one hundred yards on these critters. I'd stick to fast stepping .357 Magnum cartridges.
    I would agree with you, but the areas that I hunt groundhogs are close range. In fact, I usually use my bow, so most shots are inside 40 yards. I've owned several .357 Mag. revolvers, am well versed on the cartridges' capability, but appreciate your input on them, just the same. My plans are to load some .38 Special ammo with 148gr. HBWC with a moderate charge. Loading them backwards with the hollow base hitting first is another option, but those bullets can't be "pushed" very fast and retain good accuracy. However, they can be very devistating.

    Good hunting, Bowhunter57

  7. #7
    Bob Wright's Avatar
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    I would agree with you, but the areas that I hunt groundhogs are close range. In fact, I usually use my bow, so most shots are inside 40 yards. I've owned several .357 Mag. revolvers, am well versed on the cartridges' capability, but appreciate your input on them, just the same. My plans are to load some .38 Special ammo with 148gr. HBWC with a moderate charge. Loading them backwards with the hollow base hitting first is another option, but those bullets can't be "pushed" very fast and retain good accuracy. However, they can be very devistating.

    Good hunting, Bowhunter57
    [/QUOTE]

    At forty/fifty yards a good .38 Special load is fine for groundhog. I had never seen a groundhog until about 1977, or so, when my daughter married and moved to Ohio. My son-in-law took me groundhog hunting there, hunting over reclaimed strip-mining land. Shots were at long range, many riflemen wouldn't even consider a shot under 500 yards, where they used the hot 7mm's or .30 calibers. My first shot came at just over 100 yards, using a Super Blackhawk .44 Magnum.

    Bob Wright

    P.S. I see you're in Allen County, Ohio. My daughter is in Jefferson County, near Wintersville and Steubenville.

  8. #8
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    Well, well, well....wouldn't you know it. About the time I get settled in on a caliber, I find out that Uberti is no longer producing the Cattleman in .357 Mag.

    I guess I'll have to go for the Cattleman in 45LC.

    I'm definately going to take a closer look at the Cattleman in the Bisley grip model. I believe the "felt recoil" would be less with this grip style.
    www.uberti.com/firearms/BirdsHead.tpl

    I've never owned a 45LC, so this will be interesting. I've shot/owned .357 Mag., .44 Mag., .38 Spl., Ruger 480, so where will a 45LC fall, as far as recoil?

    Good hunting, Bowhunter57

    P.S. Bob Wright,
    Wintersville is on the other side of the state, from where I live. However, I've hunted in Tuscarawas county, just west of Jefferson county. Lima is in Allen county, which is N.W. Ohio.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bowhunter57 View Post
    teknoid,
    If you don't mind saying....Where did you purchase your Uberti?
    The best price that I can find on the Frontier is $447, which isn't bad.

    I intend to purchase this handgun in .357 Mag. caliber, as I'm more familar with it and have never owned a 45LC. It was my thoughts to load up some .38 Special loads of semi-wadcutters or wadcutters with a mild charge that would be accurate and still be deadly enough to put a knot on the noggin' of a groundhog.

    Do you have any thoughts on 45LC vs. .38 Spl./.357 Mag.?

    Good hunting, Bowhunter57

    Mine was in the Millennium finish, which is less expensive. They can be found for less than $275. If you're set on a .357, Gunsamerica has one for $325. As far as one caliber vs another, no real preference. I like the .45lc in this style. If I want to send a few .357/38 spl down range, I've got another tool for that. They're all fun.

    http://www.gunsamerica.com/976920539...Millennium.htm

  10. #10
    Bob Wright's Avatar
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    Bowhunter57,

    Please note that the Ruger Bisley grip style is the one reportedly better able to handle recoil. The Uberti is a copy of the original Colt Bisley, and is nowhere similar to Ruger's.

    The old Colt Bisley is not too much nowadays, as it was made for an entirely different shooting style than what we use today.

    Years ago I set up six revolvers with Blackhawk, Bisley, and Super Blackhawk grips, in both 4 5/8" and 7 1/2" barrel lengths. My favorite for heavy recoil was the Super Blackhawk grip. The Bisley whacked my knuckle firecely!

    If possible, try before you buy.

    Bob Wright

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