Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33
  1. #1
    mccoy's Avatar
    mccoy is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Italy, ole Europe
    Posts
    204

    Advise on first revolver

    Hello all,
    newcomer to this forum.

    I'm in the process of getting a licence for home detention and range shooting.
    In a month I'll have to decide which revolver to buy (I'm definitely a revolver man).

    I browsed some of the previous posts in this boards, read a few articles on the internet. Have some very general idea of the revolvers world. Only shot a couple of'em in the past, a Python 6-incher and a big S&W .44 mag long barrel, made in late '80s or early'90s, cannot remember the exact model.

    Both were good. The python was very good. It is presently out of commerce though and my understanding is that good used models are not easy to come by, nor do they come cheap.

    Is there, in your opinion, a model which approaches the Python performance as far as accuracy and trigger pull (and return) go?

    From the content of your past discussions, I'd narrow my choice to the S&W 686 or the Ruger GP100. Any advise as to barrel lenght? Carrying is not a main worry. I tend to like better the longer barrels (6"), do you believe these display greater accuracy or else? It isn't yet clear to me.

    What about the Smith 686 plus (7 rounds)? Problems in finding moonclips and fast-loading devices?

    What about the trigger problems which appear to characterize the Ruger models? I love the Ruger look, but I love even more to keep my rounds on target!

    Last, I love the big calibers, but again my main purpose is to hit the bullseye. Should I rule the .44's out in this respect?

    I do not hunt, I might occasionally carry in the woods for self-defense.
    I might ultimately buy a .357 first and eventually a bigger caliber as a second weapon.

  2. #2
    neophyte is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    CLT, NC
    Posts
    513

    hot dawg "Revolver"

    mccoy: Sir; a man after my own heart.
    Sir; I bang away with 2" through 7 1/2" accuracy comes with practice.
    My Rugers are more accurate than I'll ever be. Single Actions
    My Ruger GP100 4" has been more accurate than I.
    My SW638 covers as well
    There is more.
    I pick and choose for my intended purpose. The longer ones are hunting type that spend more time shooting paper and junk.
    4" for me is a good carry in the winter. 638 goes all the time when its legal.
    Now for the triggers.
    Sir; I mess around with the Ruger triggers; I'll be comfortable sitting beside SW triggers.
    Out of the box SW are supposedly ?better? my 2 are more for defense, and I think the triggers are over sprung. They'll not be adjusted for my safety.

    Sir; I shoot out to 100yds on my shooting excursions with all of them.

    Practicing has allowed me confidence. Would I advise a new shooter to shoot comfortable @100yds. Practice and confidence will make the difference.

  3. #3
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Arizona, baby!
    Posts
    5,081
    I agree that the Smith generally has a smoother out-of-the box trigger, and the Smith would be my choice.

    A 6" barrel is not mechanically any more accurate than a 4", but it may be easier for you to shoot well because it has a longer sight radius. For a defense gun, or one that will spend significant time on my hip, I would choose a 4".

    A .357 is a better choice than a .44 for a first revolver. It is less expensive to shoot, more compact to carry, and the recoil is much less intimidating to an inexperienced shooter.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

    Donate to the Christian and Stephanie Nielson Recovery fund: http://www.nierecovery.com/.

    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  4. #4
    Baldy's Avatar
    Baldy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Port St.John,FL.
    Posts
    6,741
    I recommend a 4" GP-100 Ruger to start with mainly because you said you wish to carry it some. Plus the balance on a 4" barreled revolver is about as good as it gets out of the box. The .38/.357 cartridges is a real good platfrom to start at. You can move up to the bigger stuff later. All you will need is practice. Good luck.

  5. #5
    jmorrell is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    southern Maryland
    Posts
    9
    I think a 4" 357 would be the perfect first revolver. With a 357, you have the option of shooting 38 special, 38 special +P, and 357 ammo, and the variety of ammo available is fantastic. I purchased a S&W Model 620 (seven shot .357 magnum) several months ago, and it's everything I ever wanted in an all around revolver.

  6. #6
    hideit's Avatar
    hideit is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    west chester ohio
    Posts
    1,498
    first revolver i recommend a S&W 357 4" barrell and shoot the 38 specials at the range until you are ready for the magnums

    my second choice would be the S&W 625JM 45acp this is the one that Jerry Miculek uses to win all the revolver competitions - actually this could be my first choice

  7. #7
    Pointblank's Avatar
    Pointblank is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Metro Cleveland OH
    Posts
    60

    Angry

    The new L frame Smiths (including the 686 now) have that barrel sleeve. There's no way I'd buy that, plus you get the lock. I'd go with a Ruger GP-100 in 3" fixed or 4" adjustable. Both are built like tanks, no locks and have a smoother trigger than you'd expect. These are very dependable revolvers and can handle heavy magnum loads.

  8. #8
    mccoy's Avatar
    mccoy is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Italy, ole Europe
    Posts
    204
    Gentlemen,
    thanks very much for your valuable opinions. I'm definitely going to start up with a 357/38 sp.

    The barrel lenght issue is interesting, if a longer barrel doesn't yield a mechanically better precision, than a 4" would be great, maybe Hi-viz sights can make up for shorter aim radius???

    Craig, I'll start shooting @ 12 yards, I didn't think you could achieve significant accuracy at 100 yards.
    I'd be interested to have an estimate of the achievable accuracy at such distance (100 yds), in probabilistic terms (i.e.: you can on the average put say, 70-80% of your rounds in an X radius target...).

    I saw a few Miculek's pictures, I could not download videoclips though, due to some missing plug-ins. I understand he is the fastest gunslinger on earth now, he's not into slow and deliberate revolver shooting though...or am I wrong???

    On his site JM advertises a DVD on shooting practices, something like "advanced revolver shooting", anyone has seen it, would it be worth the expense (33+ US$)?

  9. #9
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Arizona, baby!
    Posts
    5,081
    Quote Originally Posted by mccoy View Post
    I understand he is the fastest gunslinger on earth now, he's not into slow and deliberate revolver shooting though...or am I wrong???
    As far as I know, Mr. Miculek competes mainly in speed-intensive sports.

    On his site JM advertises a DVD on shooting practices, something like "advanced revolver shooting", anyone has seen it, would it be worth the expense (33+ US$)?
    I think anything Jerry Miculek has to say about revolver shooting should be very carefully considered. The man is the acknowledged modern master of DA revolver shooting. I'd certainly spend $33 on the DVD. It will probably save you more than that in ammo wasted trying to learn on your own what he can teach you in a few minutes.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

    Donate to the Christian and Stephanie Nielson Recovery fund: http://www.nierecovery.com/.

    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  10. #10
    LOCKnLOAD's Avatar
    LOCKnLOAD is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Posts
    4
    I am also thinking about getting a revolver. I shot one a very long time ago and loved how acurate it was. I am a pretty good shot with guns. What is the gun everyone is talking about? That is what I wanna get my hands on most of the time, LOL. But I really don't want a gun so big I need a 40" arms to shoot.

  11. #11
    mccoy's Avatar
    mccoy is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Italy, ole Europe
    Posts
    204
    It will probably save you more than that in ammo wasted trying to learn on your own what he can teach you in a few minutes.
    Good point, Mike.

    Anyone ever wondered why JM chose a .45 ACP as his favorite caliber?

  12. #12
    neophyte is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    CLT, NC
    Posts
    513

    without

    mccoy: Sir; without question 638 50/50 @100yds. 1'x1' square. Ruger 4" 75%
    with 10" pie plate; Blackhawk, Super Blackhawk, Super Redhawk; 5-6" on a pie plate 80% :
    Sir; without sounding trite or any better than anyone else, a lot of our shooting is @golf balls starting @50yd marker. We use water bottles with and without water. We chide each other with 'bottle caps' only. We chase the golf balls, and the water bottles. Some of the "distances" are not part of a good answer. We do start @ the 50yd marker. AND WE DO NOT HIT THE TARGET 80% of the time

    Sir; you'll improve when you have a partner who constantly supports and encourages. Balance, good shooting posture, concentrating, and not rushing to gain the next ?level?

    Our new shooters: I like them to start at 5 paces move to 7 paces; if problem arise; move to 3 paces until shooter finds the sights.
    The days it isn't going good for the new shooter. Forget the targets and shoot to enjoy the bang. If you happen to be outside in a safe place; find a stump, fallen branch, a dirt bank, anything that will become your target. Paper has a place; outside shooting has another place

    This will not happen over night. Shooting any handgun is about confidence; practice and believing that you will not miss. Sir; I own 1 scope for a long gun. My shooting is with open iron sights. I have strong opinions about my stock iron sights.

    New shooter have seen my shaking [nerve damage] they see if this 'sewing machine on wide open' can hit a target; they'll be okay

    Follow up with your experiences; and practices

  13. #13
    mccoy's Avatar
    mccoy is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Italy, ole Europe
    Posts
    204
    It will take some more time before I can buy a gun , because of red tape intricacies.

    In the meanwhile I went to the local range, which has only one big-caliber revolver model for rent, a S&W 686 6".

    I followed your suggestion to start shooting 38 special and it was good, since after 100 rounds my wrist joint started to be sore. I'll better rest for a few days.

    In this case 357 mag or even worse 44 mag might have caused pain after one dozen rounds.

    I was pretty satisfied with the results, shooting mostly SA (but also DA and left-handedly), put 60% of the rounds inside a 8" radius at 16.5 yards of distance. This after 15 years I did not touch a handgun, with a rented revolver. Might have been worse.

    I'm no more a young man, the 44 mag can wait a while until my wrists get the habit to the recoil....

  14. #14
    neophyte is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    CLT, NC
    Posts
    513

    comment

    mccoy: sir; good post and better thinking. Exposure is the key.
    On a side note with revolvers; heavier ones help in recoil. Since I know nothing about the 686-6" I'll not comment on weight.
    Sir; the GP 100 falls into the heavier handguns. Should you find one to blastaway with, maybe a difference. It has the ability of either .38's or .357
    Follow up when you heal up

  15. #15
    TerryP Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Baldy View Post
    I recommend a 4" GP-100 Ruger to start with mainly because you said you wish to carry it some. Plus the balance on a 4" barreled revolver is about as good as it gets out of the box. The .38/.357 cartridges is a real good platfrom to start at. You can move up to the bigger stuff later. All you will need is practice. Good luck.
    Can't disagree with that. I own one in 4" and it shoots better than I can and will last longer than I will. The benefit of a Ruger is you won't shoot it loose.

  16. #16
    mccoy's Avatar
    mccoy is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Italy, ole Europe
    Posts
    204
    Quote Originally Posted by neophyte View Post
    mccoy: sir; good post and better thinking. Exposure is the key.
    On a side note with revolvers; heavier ones help in recoil. Since I know nothing about the 686-6" I'll not comment on weight.
    Sir; the GP 100 falls into the heavier handguns. Should you find one to blastaway with, maybe a difference. It has the ability of either .38's or .357
    Follow up when you heal up
    Craig, the S&W 686 6" weighs 44 oz. unloaded, should be about the same as a Ruger GP 100 6". I'll check.
    The recoil was absolutely manageable, although the wrist joint made his work of shock-absorber. Since I no more train with weights nor do I use hand tools (in a few words, turned into a wimp!!! ), I should proceed with care to avoid lenghty inflammations. But I can always shoot left-handedly on one day, right-handedly on the other.

    Your statement about the gun's weight checking the recoil is sure correct, the theory behind it being clearly illustrated in the following wikipedia excerpt:

    This perception of recoil is related to the momentum associated with a particular gun. The total force of recoil is associated with the momentum of a gun, the momentum being the product of the mass of the gun times the reverse velocity of the gun. A heavier gun, that is a gun with more mass, will manifest the momentum by exhibiting a lessened acceleration, and, generally, result in a lessened perception of recoil.

  17. #17
    neophyte is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    CLT, NC
    Posts
    513

    physics

    Sir; I intended to add; How we hold the units also play a large part.
    Compare your arm to that of a shock absorber on a car. Over sprung
    will result a hard impact to soft will wallow. Happy medium is the proper [for you] hold. Experiment with stance; go to a two handed hold; once you find the balance between grip-stance-balance the pleasure will increase.

    Many watch the TV with these 'yahoo's' shooting while running, jumping, flying, sleeping, eating, shooting with "one hand". Sir, if I may be so bold, Two handed is more controllable accurate. Not in the least easier on the body.

    Last part: Physics 101; 44oz = 2lbs 12oz.
    How much does 2lbs 12oz weigh at 30'' horizontal to a perpendicular @4' above the horizontal plane [which doesn't matter] just reference; being held by an ?average? individual
    The dynamics will be
    ?average? arm weighs what? at 30" perpendicular to a horizontal -Arm becomes a lever=l*w*d
    2lbs 12oz now becomes ?what?

    The answer is simple; consider the weight of the object as only part of what you are holding up with muscle, tendon, and bone at a most floating joint. With 2 hands you have a greater body of muscle involved.

    now shoot with 2 hands

  18. #18
    mccoy's Avatar
    mccoy is offline Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Italy, ole Europe
    Posts
    204
    Craig,
    sorry I was unclear, I've been shooting with a 2-handed hold, but I've found my 'weak' hand, the left one, is actually stronger than the right one, supposedly my 'strong' side.
    So I'll use my left hand as a trigger hand, my right one as a 'prop' hand. Also, since I'm practically starting now to learn shooting, I'm definitely going and learn to shoot with both hands, before the habit of oen hand sets in.

    Also, I think I've found my model: a performance center S&W 627 8-rounds. Real beauty. Gonna open a new thread about ...her!

  19. #19
    neophyte is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    CLT, NC
    Posts
    513

    627

    mccoy; That 627 is one fine looking firearm. I do believe it would fit my hand I have no aspirations to immolate "Jerry" There are two model @SW of the 627; Full shroud is for me; or maybe both

    I said shroud and meant lug
    Last edited by neophyte; 01-17-2008 at 05:26 AM. Reason: Shroud and meant lug

  20. #20
    soldierboy029's Avatar
    soldierboy029 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Prescott, Az
    Posts
    45
    If you want a 44 caliber you will have to move to a larger frame the 686 is 357 Mag and so is the GP 100. It would be the 629 or a ruger Redhawk if you want to shoot 44. The 44 is a very accurate round but it will cost more to shoot. You can shoot lighter recoiling loads in each as you can shoot 38 Specials out of the 357 mags and 44 special or even 44 Russian out of the 44 Mag, although the Russian has quite a bit of bullet jump before it gets to the rifling in the barrel. The 44 Mag though is probably one of my favorite cartridges. Its about as much recoil as I can handle comfortably in a pistol and I have taken several deer with my Model 29 from Smith and Wesson
    Last edited by soldierboy029; 01-17-2008 at 05:45 AM. Reason: grammar

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

ruger gp100 3

,

which revover is better smith and wesson model 686 or 620

Click on a term to search for related topics.