Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: H&r .22

  1. #1
    OMSBH44 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Santa Teresa, NM
    Posts
    234

    H&r .22

    One of my relatives recently gave me the revolver her husband kept at
    his bedside before he passed away last year. It was loaded when she
    handed it to me! She isn't a gun person and didn't know how to check it.
    Her husband never told her how to use it.

    It is an H&R .22 with no markings on it other than the serial number on the
    butt of the frame and "H&R" on the plastic grips. I'll try to post a picture
    or two a bit later.

    When she handed it to me, the only way I could see to unload it was to
    remove the base pin and let the cylinder drop out. My impression is that it
    was very inexpensively made.

    Anyone know anything about H&R revolvers? I can't believe the only way
    to remove live cartridges or spent casings it to take out the cylinder.

    I'll let you know how it shoots after I have my favorite gunsmith check
    it out.

    L8'er, TP.

  2. #2
    joshshirey23's Avatar
    joshshirey23 is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Dallas Texas
    Posts
    9
    I recently purchased an H&R .22 LR revolver w/a 6" barrel still in the original box it came in. I was told that only 9 rounds has ever been shot through it. My grandfather inlaw is a self proclamed gun expert estimates it is between 25to 30 years old. But anyway on my gun to open the cylinder the base pin is spring loaded, you just pull it and swing the cylinder open, then you push the base pin towards the cylinder to eject the spent shells. Mine is a Model 929 it is stamped on the left side of the barrel along with .22 LR and Made in the USA. Have you removed the hand grips to see if there are any markings on that part of the frame? I have absolutly no complaints on how it shoots, dependable and acurate. Get back with me, I am curious about your gun.

    Josh

  3. #3
    Bob Wright's Avatar
    Bob Wright is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    1,548
    Harrington and Richardson made some stout, reliable, inexpensive revolvers until maybe 15~20 years ago. They were intended to be just that, bedside guns for those who didn't want to invest in a Colt or S&W.

    The base pin is held, on most models, by a spring loaded latch on the front of the frame. Pull out the base pin (cylinder pin) and drop out the cylinder into the palm of the hand. The cylinder pin is now the ejector rod.

    H&R also made a fine little top-break .22 R.F.

    Never top line target guns, they were popular with trappers for a coup de gras for trapped animals.

    Bob Wright

  4. #4
    OMSBH44 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Santa Teresa, NM
    Posts
    234

    H&R

    I noticed this one has model 622 written on the barrel. It has the firing
    pin on the hammer, something like Smith & Wesson, but no apparent
    firing pin block. So, I think if I ever shoot it, I'll only load 5 rounds. I'll
    have to try the old "load one, skip one, load 5" trick and see if it works.

    That is, if I ever try to shoot the thing. I looked them up and they are
    only worth about $80 dollars. Looks like I have a "safe queen" here.

    I see a part behind the trigger that I haven't figured out yet. When the
    trigger is pulled, this silver part is compressed back into the trigger guard.
    I haven't a clue what it does.

    Bye for now, TP

  5. #5
    Bob Wright's Avatar
    Bob Wright is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    1,548
    Quote Originally Posted by OMSBH44 View Post
    I noticed this one has model 622 written on the barrel. It has the firing
    pin on the hammer, something like Smith & Wesson, but no apparent
    firing pin block. So, I think if I ever shoot it, I'll only load 5 rounds. I'll
    have to try the old "load one, skip one, load 5" trick and see if it works.

    That is, if I ever try to shoot the thing. I looked them up and they are
    only worth about $80 dollars. Looks like I have a "safe queen" here.

    I see a part behind the trigger that I haven't figured out yet. When the
    trigger is pulled, this silver part is compressed back into the trigger guard.
    I haven't a clue what it does.

    Bye for now, TP
    What that part is, is the sear. In single action shooting, it holds the hammer back after it is cocked. The trigger depresses it when pulled far enough to the rear, allowing the hammer to drop.
    *
    As to "load one, skip one, load FOUR" not too sure it works on these guns. You may try and see. For Colt, and *Ruger, single actions, the sequence is this:

    1. Place hammer at half cock and open the loading gate. Make
    sure cylinder spins freely. If the hammer is drawn back too far
    the cylinder latch will engage, preventing free spin.

    2. Load one round, rotate the cylinder skipping the next chamber.

    3. Load the remaining four rounds, rotating the cylinder by hand.

    4. Close the loading gate and cock the hammer, making sure the cylinder
    rotates as the hammer is coked.

    5. Hold the hammer, press the trigger and ease the hammer fully down.


    Done correctly, there is an empty chamber under the hammer, with a round ready to rotate under it when the hammer is cocked again.

    Its faster and easier to do than tell about it. It becomes second nature to a dyed-in-the-wool single action shooter.

    Bob Wright


    *Argh! Should have said "Old Model Ruger single actions." New Model Rugers require only opening the loading gate to free up the cylinder's rotation. Don't really need to load five in New Models, but I do, anyway.
    Last edited by Bob Wright; 10-23-2007 at 09:30 AM. Reason: Caugh my error!

  6. #6
    OMSBH44 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Santa Teresa, NM
    Posts
    234

    Oops...I should have said "4" not "5"

    Yupp, I said load one, skip one, load 5...should have said 4

    My favorite revolver is an old model unmodified Super Blackhawk. Like you
    said, the procedure is second nature. I was in a bit of a hurry when I
    wrote about loading the H&R.

    That is a strange place to put the sear! But, it must work!

    I may have to dig up some .22 rim-fire ammo and try the thing out, just to
    see how it shoots.

    L8'er, TP

  7. #7
    Lucky Luke is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1

    H&R .22 Top break revolver

    Hi,

    I'm trying to identify my grandfather's revolver from a photo. I remember finding a fantastic website that showed a number of old H&R revolvers with there specs and descriptions.

    It was bought in the late 1920's, is nickel/ stainless steel (nickel I think), is .22 calibre, is a top break, has a short barrel length and it's not the 'safety' model as the hammer has the exposed spur.

    Can someone point me to a good online catalogue for these old revolvers please?

    Thanks

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

h&r .32 model 733 how to tell year made

,

h&r 22 revolver

,

h&r 622

,
h&r 622 how to open it
,

h&r 622 revolver age

,

h&r 622 serial numbers

,

h&r gun values

,
h&r revolver 623 clean i ng
,

h&r revolver forum

,
old smith wesson 22 single shot cock revolver break open 10 in. barrel
,
price for a h&r modle 622 lp
,
value of h &r model 622
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1