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  1. #1
    trevorlay's Avatar
    trevorlay is offline Junior Member
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    Wink Mossberg Model 142-A Sporting Carbine with fold down stock

    I have a model 142-A Sporting Carbine
    made by O.F. MOSSBERG & SONS, of NEW HAVEN, CONN., 1949-1954
    chambered for the .22 long rifle same action type as the mossberg model 10 sporting rifle 34.5" OAL / 6.03 lbs empty / 4-groove rifling, RH cocentric
    detachable box magazine / 7 rd capacity / 1080 FPS w/ 40 gr bullet
    18" tapered BBL / walnut monte carlo style pistol grip stock
    forearm hinges down to act as a hand grip, Has a T-Bolt.

    I was wondering if any one else has this .22 any what their thoughts are on it, I really love it, it was a hand me down from my father, shoots wonderfully! Also am curious as to how much
    it would be worth, I don't know of any sites where you can find prices on it, if any one knows of such a site that would be awesome, thanks for your time!

  2. #2
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Mossberg used to make extremely good, inexpensive .22 rifles. I wish that they still did.
    My very first rifle, a gift when I was about 12, was a M.151. Later, I got myself a M.144 for target shooting. I was very well satisfied with both of them.

    Yours doesn't seem to be worth much: Maybe $100.00, if in almost-perfect condition.

    Don't sell it.
    Use it, and hand it down to the next generation.

  3. #3
    trevorlay's Avatar
    trevorlay is offline Junior Member
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    thanks, ya I didn't plan on selling it, Its really fun to shoot!

  4. #4
    koonthomas is offline Junior Member
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    Cool mossberg 142a

    Quote Originally Posted by trevorlay View Post
    I have a model 142-A Sporting Carbine
    made by O.F. MOSSBERG & SONS, of NEW HAVEN, CONN., 1949-1954
    chambered for the .22 long rifle same action type as the mossberg model 10 sporting rifle 34.5" OAL / 6.03 lbs empty / 4-groove rifling, RH cocentric
    detachable box magazine / 7 rd capacity / 1080 FPS w/ 40 gr bullet
    18" tapered BBL / walnut monte carlo style pistol grip stock
    forearm hinges down to act as a hand grip, Has a T-Bolt.

    I was wondering if any one else has this .22 any what their thoughts are on it, I really love it, it was a hand me down from my father, shoots wonderfully! Also am curious as to how much
    it would be worth, I don't know of any sites where you can find prices on it, if any one knows of such a site that would be awesome, thanks for your time!
    I have this same rifle, I purchased it at the coast to coast hardware store when I was 12 years old I love the gun and will pass it on to my sons when I go. You can get an estimate on what it is worth from checking with the coast to coast hardware store. I lost the clip to mine several years ago and purchased a ten shot one at a gun show in San Francisco. I was told it could be worth 100 to 375 depending on the condition of the gun. The stock on my is all wood not plastic like some are. I cracked it rabbit hunting in Iowa when I was a kid. I repaired it in my high school shop class and and it looks good as new.

  5. #5
    usmcj's Avatar
    usmcj is offline Member
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    A gent named Vic Havlin pretty much wrote the book on Mossbergs. Matter of fact, he did write a book about Mossbergs. "More gun for the money"

    Vic, and his wife Cheryl, are nice folks and very knowledgeable regarding Mossbergs. Havlin Sales & Service - Mossberg Gun Parts

    Book values don't always apply to Mossberg rifles. It's not uncommon in this area to see complete Mossbergs in good condition go for $250 or so. Being an heirloom, I'd guess sales price isn't as much of an issue as insurance valuation. For Insurance, I'd suggest $300 as a starting place.

    If your rifle has a pair of one of the three types of quick-detach sling swivels, protect them. They can be as valuable as the rifle.

    Enjoy your rifle.

  6. #6
    Vins is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevorlay View Post
    I have a model 142-A Sporting Carbine
    made by O.F. MOSSBERG & SONS, of NEW HAVEN, CONN., 1949-1954
    chambered for the .22 long rifle same action type as the mossberg model 10 sporting rifle 34.5" OAL / 6.03 lbs empty / 4-groove rifling, RH cocentric
    detachable box magazine / 7 rd capacity / 1080 FPS w/ 40 gr bullet
    18" tapered BBL / walnut monte carlo style pistol grip stock
    forearm hinges down to act as a hand grip, Has a T-Bolt.

    I was wondering if any one else has this .22 any what their thoughts are on it, I really love it, it was a hand me down from my father, shoots wonderfully! Also am curious as to how much
    it would be worth, I don't know of any sites where you can find prices on it, if any one knows of such a site that would be awesome, thanks for your time!
    I have the exact same rifle I inherited from my dad. Plan on passing it to my son, soon. Love the rifle. For a bolt action 22, it's quite accurate and easy to shoot. I had take the sites off and put on a scope. Folks moved after I left home and have no idea where my stuff is. I'm sure it's still in a box, somewhere, as they don't throw anything out. Recently ordered sites on line and a couple of magazines. Should be in within a week or two. I refinished the stock with tongue oil when I was younger. Needs bluing, but have never gotten around to that.
    The guns, in good shape, sell for anywhere from $150 to $270...at least that's what I've seen them go for. A gun in rough shape could be parted out for more than it's worth. Front site cost me about $40 and the rear was about $20. Mags $28 a piece. Not bad, seeing I think my dad paid $25 for it when he was a kid.

  7. #7
    flasher55 is offline Junior Member
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    Hi just thought I would let you know that I have one in very good shape and I have had it ever sense I was 14 and that would be almost 50 years that I have had it
    and I still love it today, because I could hit almost anything with it, even a rabbit on the run. I had many days when I would come home from school I would put as
    many as 500 rounds through it, so I became very good with it, it helped when I went into the Army and I had to qualify with a rifle so I will never for get how good
    they shoot, mine still has the peep sights on it and the original sling on it, they might not be worth as much as some high price 22's but I think it will shoot just as
    good as the best ones out there if you can hold it so there only worth as much as you like them and I like mine a lot!!!

  8. #8
    hud35500's Avatar
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    . Picked this Model 151 up from a neighbor. The barrel had so much surface rust, it obscured all markings and the stock was in rough shape. Bore was like new, the internal parts showed almost no wear at all. Steel wool and WD-40 cleaned the metal parts up really well. I sanded the stock down and filled a couple of small cracks. Then I broke out the Duracoat and painted the whole thing. Gave the stock a coat of semi gloss to give it some contrast. I had never seen a Mossberg .22 rifle before this. I think it's a keeper!

  9. #9
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
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    Original equipment on that M.151 included a receiver aperture sight that was merely stamped out of sheet metal.
    It looked cheap, but it was quite solid. It was capable of better accuracy than I was, at the time that I owned one.

    The original, hooded front sight, also made of stamped parts, boasted permanently-attached, changeable posts of various thicknesses, and included at least one aperture.

    The barrel-mounted, fully-adjustable open sight, also stamped, was just as solid as the other parts were.

    To this day, I remain amazed at what Mossberg could do with sheet-metal stampings and spot welds.
    The bolt handle of the M.144, a target-competition rifle, was also the locking lug. It, too was a sheet-metal stamping, folded into place and held together with a single spot weld.

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