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Thread: Shotgun?

  1. #1
    Holly's Avatar
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    Shotgun?

    I know NOTHING about shotguns.

    So, if I were to purchase a shotgun, which would you recommend? I'm 5'2", 100...and something... pounds, and shoot left-handed, if that matters.

  2. #2
    denner's Avatar
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    A shot gun for what purpose? and how much do ya wanna spend, semi-auto or pump?
    $269-$350: Remington 870, Mossberg, Winchester.

  3. #3
    Holly's Avatar
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    Ah!

    Um... I don't know? Purpose... because I want one? Home defense, in worst case.

    Pump.

    Price is not an issue.

  4. #4
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    Remington 870 Home Defense or Mossberg Home Defense or Winchester SXT Home Defense. Can't go wrong with any of them and best bang for the buck for home defense. Anywhere from $300.00 to $400.00 depending on where you purchase them.

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    DJ Niner's Avatar
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    Mossberg pump shotguns have a tang safety, located on the top-rear of the receiver, which is conveniently under-the-thumb for left- or right-handed shooters; I've used various model 500s for the last several decades as a lefty with no problems. The 500-series guns have aluminum receivers, which is a good news/bad news situation; lighter means easier to carry and swing quickly, but they kick a bit harder than a heavier steel-receiver weapon. I'd recommend taking a look at the shorter-stocked youth models, as they may "fit" petite folks slightly better (full-size stocks and shorter arms makes for cumbersome handling qualities and slow/awkward shooting). "Fit" is very important for a shotgun if you intend to shoot it quickly/instinctively (as they are intended to be used), vs. slowly mounted and aimed like a rifle.

    Unless you really want a new one, I've seen lots of decent used Mossberg shotguns in local pawn shops (Eastern ND) in the $175-$250 range. Scheels will be higher, but you still might find a nice-looking solid used gun for significantly less than a new one, and they will guarantee functioning of their used guns, so there isn't any real risk of getting a lemon. Spend the price difference on a bunch of ammo!
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
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  6. #6
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    At the risk of sounding .................well I dunno just at your size I would get a 20ga and not a 12. Cosiderable difference in recoil between the two and the 20 aint no girly gun.

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    Holly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooter View Post
    At the risk of sounding .................well I dunno just at your size I would get a 20ga and not a 12. Cosiderable difference in recoil between the two and the 20 aint no girly gun.
    You don't sound very ".................well I dunno" at all. That's one of the things I was wondering. Thanks!

    DJ Niner, I don't think I'd thought of looking at youth models before. That's a very good idea!!! I mean... If I buy shoes in the children's section, why not a gun? Hahaha! I'll look around. Thank you.

  8. #8
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    Several small-statured friends of mine have used the short-stocked Remington and Mossberg youth models over the years, and done very well with them. I'd try to give them crap about it, but it wouldn't stick; they were usually much better shots than I was (with a shotgun, I'm only an average shooter; some days, less than average).

    I also would have suggested the 20 gauge as a good starter shotgun (as I have for the last few decades), but most of the big-name ammo manufacturers now offer reduced-recoil 12 gauge buckshot and even slug loads, so I don't consider it as important as it once was. Most of the reduced-recoil loads throw the same weight projectile(s) as the full-power stuff, but they throw it a bit slower, to keep the recoil manageable. I think there is at least one manufacturer that makes loads that are slower and containing a lighter projectile load as well, for significantly less kick. There is almost no recoil-related reason to step down to a 20 gauge today.

    I use a lot of the Remington reduced-recoil slugs; I try to catch them on sale after deer season, and fill-up the old ammo locker with enough to last me until sale season next year...
    "Placement is power" -- seen in an article by Stephen A. Camp
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    Holly, measure your "length of pull" ..unscientific method... keep your wrist straight and bend your left arm 90 degrees. Measure the distance from the lower part of your bicep tendon, (inside of your elbow joint) to the second joint of your trigger finger. The closer you can match the length from the butt plate to the trigger to your length of pull, in any long gun you plan to purchase, the better off you'll be.

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    Hey, thanks! If I caught that right... 13"? Hmmmm... Now to look around.

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    I'll bet you a cup of coffee (or yer favorite beverage) that many of the folks that see you measuring a shotgun, will have no concept of what you're doing, or why.

  12. #12
    Holly's Avatar
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    I'm sure you'd be correct. And coffee would be lovely.

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    I would agree with just about everything said. Some very good advice IMHO. Just one thing to think about in regard to the following:

    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Niner View Post
    There is almost no recoil-related reason to step down to a 20 gauge today.

    ...
    Low recoil 12 gauge ammo is not always available in many of the places I shop for low prices (Walmart).

    One more consideration, youth model 20 gauge shotguns are common. Many gun stores will have one.

    By the way, as a lefty myself, I really like my Mossberg 500 for the location of the safety.

  14. #14
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    Thank you, Charles.

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