Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    motopotamus is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    7

    The Bryco Model 59 Challenge

    Hi guys, new to the board and new to gunsmithing. The gun Ill be working with, at least for now, is the Bryco model 59 9mm. Dont reply yet, read on. A friend of mine bought it and as it turns out, it wont fire. Well, I guess not since the working tip of the firing pin is gone. Hardened steel with virtually no radius at the bottom of the striking tip, no rigidity in any of the parts Ive looked at so far, Im not surprised it broke. Anyway, my friend goes to throw it away and find the guy who sold it to him. I had to at least try to fix it, and after several minutes he agreed to let me take it. I'm currently out of work due to disability, but I was gainfully employed for 20 years as a machinist with tool and die work being the bulk of that. I have a small, but not very well equiped machine shop at home now, because I just love to make chips. Machinery-wise I only have a lathe, but I have a milling attachment for it, so I can do anything if Im willing to take the time. I havent been doing anything with any of it for months and the idea of some gunsmithing really sounded fun.

    What I have is a Model 'Bryco 59' 9mm. The safety is missing, save a tiny chunk of gnarled up plastic that doesnt engage anything and the firing pin is broken. Besides that, all other defects seem to be generic and unavoidable with guns made by these folks. Its been an interesting couple days reading about the horrible reputation these weapons have. Honestly, Im a bit scared at the idea of shooting it after I get it to the point where it will shoot, but I think this is probably a good thing and will likely discourage me from cutting corners.

    So, obviously I want to fix the safety and firing pin, but I also want to heavily modify the other problem areas on the gun to see if I can actually make it worth more than nothing, which is about what its currently valued at. I purchased the only drawings of it I could find from Numrich and searched high and low for any other drawings or documentation on the gun. Even after watching a couple of youtube videos on breaking it down I still cant tell how this safety is supposed to work. Im not ordering a new safety for it, btw, Im making one. Im only doing this because I want a fresh project and this is just right, so dont bother telling me that a safety is only $7, I know. Can anyone point me to a picture or video or book that will shed some light on this gun's action? I want to make some changes aimed at rigidity. I also want to change how that bar coming off the trigger interacts with the cam. Both the cam and the other part are loose and the area of contact is tiny. Its no wonder to me that they go off without pulling the trigger during unloading. That is another reason why I want to make a custom safety, so it can be on while unloading. Where the sear engages the notch in the firing pin I want to rework and slightly modify for it to get a better grip since those parts were designed to fit and work together within a fairly small envelope, yet the manufacturing tolerances seem so wide open that the accumulated slop between them makes it easy for the sear to slip loose or the firing pin to not catch at all when it cycles or you try to cock it. With this weapon Im not even exagerating when I say I cant possibly make it worse.

    Well, thats the high points. Im sure Ill think of some other stuff later, but for now thats really all I got. I really need help finding any documentation that may be out there so I can try to suss out how this action is intended to work. For I can tell for the most part, but not entirely. For instance, how the cam engages that piece from the trigger(whats it called?). Im not terribly concerned with how the safety is supposed to work, though I would like to see because the one I have has a metal tab protruding from the frame that says 'SAFE' and I cant imagine how a safety lever would go over it and I dont see this tab on videos of this gun being tore down, so Im pretty curious. The safety is definitely going to be modified and custom, so like I said, Im not terribly worried about how its was intended to work.

    For those who are thinking it - I did try to register at the actual Bryco-Jennings-X-X forum and it would not accept my gmail address. I could not find a reason for that, though only two possibilities seem likely. Either this is stop new registrations for some reason, or its the fact that gmail is basically an anonymous service, well, it can be if you want it to be. I only found one other person who posted about this same issue and said they accepted the email issued by his isp. That was really all I needed to hear for me to decide that they must have a problem with anonymous email services.

    Thanks for reading, Ill post pics soon.

  2. #2
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,207
    I think that you should stick to those muzzleloaders you suggested elsewhere.

    Bryco/Jennings pistols aren't worth the time you'll put into them.
    There's a lot of zinc and other soft metals involved, and the actions aren't well designed.
    You might see this as a learning project, but I suggest that it won't be. You'll get more frustration than learning out of it.

  3. #3
    motopotamus is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    7
    Thats terrible. I dont think a firearm manufacturer ever in the history of the planet has such a soiled reputation.

    I appreciate your advice. I could swear I read that same reply given to everyone who proposes to whip a Bryco/Jennings handgun into usable shape, on several different boards. Your opinion is not in the minority.

    However, I must get it to the point where it will fire and cycle at least half the clip with no issues. I really dont see it so much as a learning experience, as I see it something to do that is a challenge, and it will hold my attention for at least a little while. The zinc alloyed frame and slide are the only two things about the gun that make me feel like it's not worth the trouble since its only a matter of time, under any real use, before the frame and/or slide crack. I would like to modify the safety to work like a sane person designed it and make it more stable as far as how the sear holds the firing pin back. It doesnt even have to last. I just want to see it work well and safely one time, when I shoot it, after that he can throw it away. I have no affection towards the gun whatsoever, but Ive been out of work since 2010, and one of the things I loved about machine work, and continue to love, is solving problems like the ones this hand grenade present.

    Another thing I noticed about it is the almost absence of rifling. It is rifled, but the grooves dont look deeper than .005", though I havent measured it. Is this from wear? No way someone put enough rounds through this thing to wear it down like that, stupid question, but Im gonna ask anyway :^)

    One more question - Is it possible that dry firing is what broke the tip off the firing pin?

  4. #4
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,207
    You're working with a very poorly-made, very cheaply-sold pistol.
    If the rifling is shallow, it fits the general description of both the design and the sales efforts of the makers.
    The firing pin may have been broken as a result of dry-firing. However, judging by the education level that I would expect of a customer for such a pistol, the breakage might also have been due to merely "playing around" with the gun, rather than from any serious practice.
    The firing pin may have broken because it had been poorly heat-treated. That is, like similar parts of the cheaper 20th-century Spanish guns, it may have been hardened all the way through, and subsequently never properly tempered. Test it with a file, and see.

  5. #5
    motopotamus is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    7
    Lol, your assesment sounds fair and likely dead on. Nobody so far Ive talked to has ever even heard of Bryco or had any clue to its reputation. I dont own any guns and dont really want a handgun. Nothing anti-gun or anything. I definitely prefer the idea of a well armed public. I just dont have a need for a handgun at this time that would justify the cost of what Id want. If someone wants to give me a desert eagle, thats not hot, Ill take it right now just to prove I will :^D . I wouldnt mind having a nice rifle to hunt with and maybe a nice shotgun. A Rem 1100 or something so I could help keep the worlds dove population in check.

    Regarding the pin, I knew it was too hard the first time i ever had it out. I dont have any way to actually check the diameter of the missing part since it broke off flush with that shoulder, but Im pretty sure the diameter was .187" and atleast .135" + ?" long (how far past the breechface should the striker protrude on average?), and at most, had only about .015" corner radius. Thats one reason it snapped off so flush, and left me nothing to check. I know if I were making those Id finish with a .015" or smaller radius tool, simply because that long skinny shit will want to chatter with a .032" tool pushing on it with no center. I think they are obviously motivated by profit above all else, as is evident by the flooding of the country with such a thing . So, they just didnt bother to interpolate a radius in favor of faster cycle times. Had they put even .03" worth of radius on there, I seriously doubt they would be known for breaking the way they are. The chamfer on the hole where it goes in, is plenty big enough to accomodate a .03" radius. Ive done that kind of stuff for a few manufacturers that did high volumes of car parts, and youd be amazed at how much money it adds up to when you shave a few seconds off the cycle time of a high volume part. Why else would such a flaw be able to persist and not be worth fixing?

    Lol, known for breaking firing pins, wtf? Its still crazy to me that there is such a gun, known to have so many serious generic flaws. I wouldnt expect any tool, certainly a handgun, to be very popular when its known for breaking, several different ways, often causing injury to the shooter, or the habit of going off without touching the trigger while the the chamber is open. I wouldnt expect to see that its such a common gun, even for a ghetto throw away piece. Yet, apparently they are the most common type of gun seized by police used in commision of a crime lol. My buddy didnt know its was such a pos or anything about its quality and paid way too much for it. He's anxious to have a chance to talk that dude again, I cant blame him.

    I dont plan to buy a firing pin for it, but I am gonna make one. I already have the dimensions sketched out and a piece of 5/16" stainless chucked up. Im not gonna harden it, because for one its not gonna be fired enough to make that nessesary. I can see hardening the end so it doesnt mushroom over time and eventually not move freely. Or maybe pressing in something hard, 3/16" is common enough, press in a dowel. But, for now Im just gonna make one from this stainless, its tough enough to where I dont think itll start to deform right away. Its not as if he is trying to sell it. Judging by the way he talks I dont even think he would sell it to me, if I wanted to buy it.

    I dont know if Ill do all I day dreamed of doing or not, but I am gonna do some basic stuff just because Ive been pretty lazy and unmotivated for a couple months and I havent did much gun work, so its interesting at the moment. Im at a disadvantage, I havent had one apart in 15 years I bet, at least not past what would be common for a good cleaning. I still cant observe the sear cam doing what it does with the trigger linkage. I know that probably makes absolutely no sense to you guys, but I havent looked at very many actions, believe it or not. Thats the main reason Im being such a crackhead about it right now, because its totally new, and I because I gotta shoot it once, at least.

  6. #6
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,207
    ...And don't shoot it. Not even once.

    The "fired"-condition firing pin protrudes somewhere about 1/16", or a little more, from the breechface.
    You might check a good gunsmith's reference, in your public library, for an exact specification, 'cause I'm just guessing.

  7. #7
    motopotamus is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    7
    .312 is smaller than .375, why then did I think I had stock? I even got so far as to take a skim cut to set the dial for the OD before I realized that Im an idiot.

    I can hear the thoughts coming in from around the planet now, 'damn, this fool gone shoot his self sho 'nuff'

  8. #8
    GCBHM is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    1,050
    Yeah, these things are simply throw away guns. I would never own one. I really don't know how they can even be called "guns", but there is a market for them. You're better served to destroy it and throw it away, and stick with better guns. Good luck!

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •