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  1. #1
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    Bore brushes necessary?

    I'm going to be buying my first handgun soon and will also need to get cleaning supplies. I plan on cleaning after every shooting session, so will a patch soaked in solvent do the job just fine for the barrel? Or is it worth it to have a brush? Thanks in advance for your opinions.

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  3. #2
    TOF's Avatar
    TOF
    TOF is offline Senior Member
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    Buy a good kit with bronze or plastic brush and use it regularly.

    Have fun in the process.


  4. #3
    Dragonfire is offline Junior Member
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    Buy a kit. Usually they have a bronze brush included if its caliber specific. Personally I wouldnt bother with a plastic bore brush. I have tried using them and they dont work.

    Get break-free CLP for cleaning and protecting. Use a little wilson ultima-lube on the slide rails and your set.

  5. #4
    Baldy's Avatar
    Baldy is offline Senior Member
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    I shoot almost all reloads and I have to use a brush to get all the lead out. Mostly when I am working up a load. Yes buy a brush and use it. Good luck.

  6. #5
    tony pasley's Avatar
    tony pasley is offline Senior Member
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    Yes get both plastic and bronze brushes, also a set of dental picks to get the nooks and crannies that you just can't quite reach into.

  7. #6
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    Thanks

    Thanks for the tips. I'll definitely make sure I get a brush.

    I checked out that Break-Free CLP stuff on their web site. Sounds like amazing stuff. They make it sound like it's all you need for cleaning, lube and protection. Probably too good to be true, but might give it a try if the price is right.

    Thanks again.

  8. #7
    sidaemon is offline Junior Member
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    Clean clean clean. Use the bore brush every time, and the advise about dental picks is priceless. In my experience the better you clean a weapon the better it will perform. Good luck and be safe!

  9. #8
    Mike Barham's Avatar
    Mike Barham is offline Senior Member
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    I am lazy and prefer Boresnakes.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

    Donate to the Christian and Stephanie Nielson Recovery fund: http://www.nierecovery.com/.

    All opinions, particularly those involving politics and Glocks, are mine and not Galco's.

  10. #9
    Wandering Man's Avatar
    Wandering Man is online now GM HGF Gold Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Barham View Post
    I am lazy and prefer Boresnakes.
    Yeah, but then you have to catch mice to feed the Boresnakes, otherwise they get hungry, grouchy, and can turn on you.



    WM
    Never argue with drunks or crazy people.

  11. #10
    Liko81 is offline Member
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    It's worth it to have a bore brush. If you can find one for your caliber, get a Tynex (plastic) bristle brush. It works just as well cleaning fouling, but doesn't scratch metal so cleaning it every time you shoot it won't damage the barrel like copper-brass bristles can. It comes in especially handy if you plan on shooting cheap ammo (Monarch, Blazer, up to and including WWB); a lot of these ammos burn very dirty and really foul the barrel. You can use dozens of patches to get the stuff back out of the rifling, or a quick scrub with the brush can mean you only need three or four. You'll want a stiff toothbrush to scrub the fouling off the breech and back block as well. Use an old one, or just buy a new one with the stiffest bristles and the smallest head they have available.

    It's also worth it to have a swab, especially if your solvent and lubricant aren't best buds. Your standard Hoppes' gun oil and solvent are totally soluble, and if you leave it a bit damp with solvent and run an oiled patch through the solvent will just evaporate and the oil stays put. However, combinations involving non-petroleum lubes, dry lubes or moly grease don't mix happily, and if the surface was solvent-wetted and not dried the solvent will evaporate leaving holes in your lube and rust protection.

    Basic cleaning kit:
    * Bore rod with at least 2 ends; the right diameter cleaning plug and the eyelet for running a REALLY wet patch through to soak.
    * Bore brush
    * Bore swab
    * Patches of the right size. Get a lot; they're cheap and you cannot BELIEVE how fast you go through them.
    * Handled bristle brush. a toothbrush works, as does a test tube brush found at laboratory suppliers and some restaurant supply stores. Gets the tough stuff elsewhere than inside the barrel. Also great for cleaning magazines.
    * Q-tips. Again, get a lot; they're good for cleaning dirty lube and powder dust out of crevices and the slide.
    * solvent; Hoppes is good, Breakfree CLP's better and it's a decent gun oil too
    * light gun oil for trigger, safety and and most internal workings
    * slide grease for slide/barrel, recoil guide, and sear
    * Chap-Stick. Trust me, it's the best value in lubrication for mag followers you'll ever find.
    * safety glasses. Solvent in the eye from a flicked brush bristle ain't fun; you can use your shooting glasses or get a dedicated pair.
    * A few old rags; there are some jobs too big for patcches or a brush.
    * Canned air; optional, but it gets the worst of the powder dust out of the frame and has other uses on the workbench.

  12. #11
    Dredd is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liko81 View Post
    It's worth it to have a bore brush. If you can find one for your caliber, get a Tynex (plastic) bristle brush. It works just as well cleaning fouling, but doesn't scratch metal so cleaning it every time you shoot it won't damage the barrel like copper-brass bristles can. It comes in especially handy if you plan on shooting cheap ammo (Monarch, Blazer, up to and including WWB); a lot of these ammos burn very dirty and really foul the barrel. You can use dozens of patches to get the stuff back out of the rifling, or a quick scrub with the brush can mean you only need three or four. You'll want a stiff toothbrush to scrub the fouling off the breech and back block as well. Use an old one, or just buy a new one with the stiffest bristles and the smallest head they have available.

    It's also worth it to have a swab, especially if your solvent and lubricant aren't best buds. Your standard Hoppes' gun oil and solvent are totally soluble, and if you leave it a bit damp with solvent and run an oiled patch through the solvent will just evaporate and the oil stays put. However, combinations involving non-petroleum lubes, dry lubes or moly grease don't mix happily, and if the surface was solvent-wetted and not dried the solvent will evaporate leaving holes in your lube and rust protection.

    Basic cleaning kit:
    * Bore rod with at least 2 ends; the right diameter cleaning plug and the eyelet for running a REALLY wet patch through to soak.
    * Bore brush
    * Bore swab
    * Patches of the right size. Get a lot; they're cheap and you cannot BELIEVE how fast you go through them.
    * Handled bristle brush. a toothbrush works, as does a test tube brush found at laboratory suppliers and some restaurant supply stores. Gets the tough stuff elsewhere than inside the barrel. Also great for cleaning magazines.
    * Q-tips. Again, get a lot; they're good for cleaning dirty lube and powder dust out of crevices and the slide.
    * solvent; Hoppes is good, Breakfree CLP's better and it's a decent gun oil too
    * light gun oil for trigger, safety and and most internal workings
    * slide grease for slide/barrel, recoil guide, and sear
    * Chap-Stick. Trust me, it's the best value in lubrication for mag followers you'll ever find.
    * safety glasses. Solvent in the eye from a flicked brush bristle ain't fun; you can use your shooting glasses or get a dedicated pair.
    * A few old rags; there are some jobs too big for patcches or a brush.
    * Canned air; optional, but it gets the worst of the powder dust out of the frame and has other uses on the workbench.
    Chap-stick...never would have thought of that

    I also like Bore Snakes. They're easier to use than brushes and patches IMO. Essentially it's both in one and does everything in one motion. They can be washed and reused as well. There's no wrong way to clean a gun provided you use the proper tools and have the proper lube after it's all clean.

  13. #12
    sharkie03 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liko81 View Post
    If you can find one for your caliber, get a Tynex (plastic) bristle brush. It works just as well cleaning fouling, but doesn't scratch metal so cleaning it every time you shoot it won't damage the barrel like copper-brass bristles can.
    I'm not an expert on guns nor am I trying to start an argument, but a copper or brass brush should never damage a stainless steel barrel due to the fact that stainless is allot harder than copper or brass. I'm a mechanic by trade and most fuel injector tips on diesel engines are stainless and the only thing the manuf. recommends to remove the carbon build up is a brass or copper brush because this will not damage the delecate tip of the injector

  14. #13
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    Holy thread resurrection!

    I guess I could say I "prefer" brass bore brushes but I think that's because I've never used anything else. Will a bore snake do the job just as well or better? I'm finding I scrub my poly-rifled handgun barrels WAY more than the traditional threaded rifling and I'm hoping to find something which will cut down on my scrub time. I just find it odd a poly-rifled barrel somehow retains more dirt even though the inner surface is flatter. Anyone notice this, too? Any tips?

    Thanks!

  15. #14
    clanger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by literaltrance View Post
    Holy thread resurrection!

    I guess I could say I "prefer" [BRONZE] bore brushes but I think that's because I've never used anything else. Will a bore snake do the job just as well or better? I'm finding I scrub my poly-rifled handgun barrels WAY more than the traditional threaded rifling and I'm hoping to find something which will cut down on my scrub time. I just find it odd a poly-rifled barrel somehow retains more dirt even though the inner surface is flatter. Anyone notice this, too? Any tips?

    Thanks!
    Fixed fer ya.....

    I've been having really good luck with S&W bore gel when things get really nasty.

    Pre-swab with a patch soaked in carb cleaner.
    Lookit all that crud!

    Then- Fill the brush bristles with the foam, several passes later and black goo comes out, and blue goo too if there's copper.

    Rinse and repeat if nec.

    Admire the shine.

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharkie03 View Post
    I'm not an expert on guns nor am I trying to start an argument, but a copper or brass brush should never damage a stainless steel barrel due to the fact that stainless is allot harder than copper or brass. I'm a mechanic by trade and most fuel injector tips on diesel engines are stainless and the only thing the manuf. recommends to remove the carbon build up is a brass or copper brush because this will not damage the delecate tip of the injector
    It is possible to scratch the surface as the bristels can get swedged or have points. Minor point.

    Major point is crown damaged from using a steel rod and no crown gaurd. Also the brush body is steel and can scratch too.

  17. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanger View Post
    Fixed fer ya.....

    I've been having really good luck with S&W bore gel when things get really nasty.

    Pre-swab with a patch soaked in carb cleaner.
    Lookit all that crud!

    Then- Fill the brush bristles with the foam, several passes later and black goo comes out, and blue goo too if there's copper.

    Rinse and repeat if nec.

    Admire the shine.
    Ooops, my bad, bronze it is.

    Still a little lost though. If the cleaning agent causes blue goo to come out, wouldn't this also ruin the brush? Also, straight carb cleaner? Got a brand name you could recommend? I'd like to get the stuff tonight if possible. I've been thinking my poly-rifled barrels have been a little dirty for months now.

  18. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by literaltrance View Post
    Ooops, my bad, bronze it is.

    Still a little lost though. If the cleaning agent causes blue goo to come out, wouldn't this also ruin the brush? Also, straight carb cleaner? Got a brand name you could recommend? I'd like to get the stuff tonight if possible. I've been thinking my poly-rifled barrels have been a little dirty for months now.
    Solly I snoozed on this.... didn't get the e-mail ticlker.

    Blue stuff is copper coming off the bbl. Depending on the cleaner, it may or not attack the brush. I rinse mine in water and dry between scrubbin's. Follow the driections on the can. Can't go wrong there. If yer really fouled, it'll be a mess for sure as stuff comes off....do it in increments, swab, mop up goo, start fresh.... repeat.Yer not gonna believe how much stuff you missed the first time.

    Use a crown gaurd!

    Paper towels are your friend (helps save on patches...no lint threads like rags can leave). Grab two rolls. It's gonna get ugly if the bore is fouled.

    Carb Cleaner- good ol Gumout in a can (for bore only). Last's about 500 cleanings. At least!

    Have fun!

  19. #18
    MLB's Avatar
    MLB
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    Be careful with carb cleaner on painted finishes. Not sure about plastic parts. May have trouble there too. A guy I know wrecked a finish on a Henry rifle receiver with a solvent.

  20. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by MLB View Post
    Be careful with carb cleaner on painted finishes. Not sure about plastic parts. May have trouble there too. A guy I know wrecked a finish on a Henry rifle receiver with a solvent.
    Its also harmful to some oil finishes. Hoppe's Blast & Clean did a very through job of unintentionally stripping the factory finish off of a set of my wood grips.

  21. #20
    clanger's Avatar
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    protect your finish....

    Quote Originally Posted by clanger View Post
    Carb Cleaner- good ol Gumout in a can (for bore only). Last's about 500 cleanings. At least!

    Have fun!

    Yep -good points re: finish etc.

    As stated- bore only, use a patch etc....

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