Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    kansas_plainsman's Avatar
    kansas_plainsman is offline Supporting Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Kansas
    Posts
    430

    Question Do you live near a 'no go' area?

    Several science fiction writers (notably Heinlien) have suggested that in a dark future, America might have 'no go' areas where even the police won't enter.

    It appears that they were right to an extent - some years ago I lived near the Detroit metro area, and it was said that there were certain areas the police didn't even try to patrol in Detroit proper.

    Do you live near, or know of, such an area? Just how wide-spread is this today?

  2. #2
    Baldy's Avatar
    Baldy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Port St.John,FL.
    Posts
    6,740
    All big citys have them now. Cops only go in as a group.

  3. #3
    john doe. is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    US
    Posts
    2,850
    I've heard of some areas in Chicago are rough that way. There was a village in Alaska that required lots of backup when they entered. White's were not very welcome.

  4. #4
    scooter's Avatar
    scooter is offline Supporting Member - Legally Armed Scooter Trash
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,031
    If ya HAVE to drive thru dallas between 3 and 5 am dont stop at the red lights

  5. #5
    Vom Kriege's Avatar
    Vom Kriege is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by Baldy View Post
    All big citys have them now. Cops only go in as a group.
    It ain't just the big cities. There are some scary areas in small towns and some really scary rural areas where there isn't enough LE coverage to mount any kind of a response much less a proactive patrol.

  6. #6
    kansas_plainsman's Avatar
    kansas_plainsman is offline Supporting Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Kansas
    Posts
    430
    Vom Kriege, you don't happen to live in a metro area, do you?

  7. #7
    Vom Kriege's Avatar
    Vom Kriege is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by kansas_plainsman View Post
    Vom Kriege, you don't happen to live in a metro area, do you?
    I currently live just outside of a small city of 100,000 or so, but I'm only an hour from Atlanta. I have lived in rural, urban, and suburban areas as well as several small towns. In all of them, I have seen areas that were pretty scary.

    Sure, the big cities have some downright frightening areas, but I've also been to some pretty frightening areas in the middle of nowhere and help a long ways away.

  8. #8
    kansas_plainsman's Avatar
    kansas_plainsman is offline Supporting Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Kansas
    Posts
    430
    I asked, not as a challenge per se, but to gauge your perspective. I once attended a technical conference where a fellow from New York City had all sorts of interesting preconceptions about rural America. He was uninformed; loudly so.

    I agree that there are dangerous areas anywhere; rural areas included. I maintain that there are critical differences. I have difficulty constructing a rural analog of the peril a young woman would face breaking down at an intersection of downtown Detroit at two in the morning. A breakdown in rural Kansas at two in the morning means she's not likely to see ANYONE, and the odds that an encounter would end in robbery or assault are pretty low.

    Similiarly, a breakdown in even the seediest small town means that a walk of two or three (short) blocks and she's changed her 'threat environment' completely.

    In Detroit, that distance could be measured in miles, regardless of the direction she chose.

    For the record, I grew up in a town of less than 10,000, and have lived in Houston, Kansas City, Wichita, London UK, Seattle and Detroit.

  9. #9
    rfawcs's Avatar
    rfawcs is offline Supporting Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    514
    I live in Maryland, about 20 miles south of the District of Columbia. I don't go into DC unless I can't avoid it it, and I get in and out as fast as I can. I haven't been there in several years. The potential of becoming a crime victim is there, but it actually isn't that bad (for non-residents) unless you're just stupid.

    The bigger problem is becoming a victim of the DC government's voracious appetite for revenue. You have a much better chance of having your car booted or towed for parking in a no-parking area (which is just about everywhere) ($200, cash only); getting a ticket for going 27 in a 25 from an unattended camera ($120); or being accosted by the ever-present panhandlers and "homeless" population.

  10. #10
    Vom Kriege's Avatar
    Vom Kriege is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by kansas_plainsman View Post
    I asked, not as a challenge per se, but to gauge your perspective. I once attended a technical conference where a fellow from New York City had all sorts of interesting preconceptions about rural America. He was uninformed; loudly so.

    I agree that there are dangerous areas anywhere; rural areas included. I maintain that there are critical differences. I have difficulty constructing a rural analog of the peril a young woman would face breaking down at an intersection of downtown Detroit at two in the morning. A breakdown in rural Kansas at two in the morning means she's not likely to see ANYONE, and the odds that an encounter would end in robbery or assault are pretty low.

    Similiarly, a breakdown in even the seediest small town means that a walk of two or three (short) blocks and she's changed her 'threat environment' completely.

    In Detroit, that distance could be measured in miles, regardless of the direction she chose.

    For the record, I grew up in a town of less than 10,000, and have lived in Houston, Kansas City, Wichita, London UK, Seattle and Detroit.
    No challenge taken.

    My father used to travel on his job prior to his retirement. He had for a short time an area in coal country parts of KY. Things were so bad in that area that once he stayed had a chain motel that had four armed guards on patrol in the parking lot, which had a mean security fence around it.

    He called on another account in another town and asked about hotels in the area. He was told that under no circumstances should he be in the area after dark with an out of state tag.

    I work in a pretty tame area, but I have ridden with buddies from other departments just to get a feel for different types of police work. I've never really gotten nervous in an urban area, but I've been in some places in the middle of nowhere that made me very aware than any help was a long ways away.

    I've been in some pretty scary places in hotlanta though.

  11. #11
    Mr. P's Avatar
    Mr. P is offline Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    495
    Quote Originally Posted by kansas_plainsman View Post
    Several science fiction writers (notably Heinlien) have suggested that in a dark future, America might have 'no go' areas where even the police won't enter.

    It appears that they were right to an extent - some years ago I lived near the Detroit metro area, and it was said that there were certain areas the police didn't even try to patrol in Detroit proper.

    Do you live near, or know of, such an area? Just how wide-spread is this today?
    Yup. Parts of Atlanta.

  12. #12
    kansas_plainsman's Avatar
    kansas_plainsman is offline Supporting Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    North Kansas
    Posts
    430
    Vom,

    Interesting story about your father. What was the situation that made it so dangerous? A strike? Corrupt local government?

    It calls to mind a situation when I was a boy. My family owned some land in rural Arkansas. My father took me with him to check on it. He had been made aware of the fact that the caretaker was 'in' with a large lumbering operation, which was highjacking wallnut off that land.

    The caretaker took us in the south end through some of the roughest ground in Arkansas. The lumber road came in the north end and was flat as a table. For some reason he never got around to taking us anywhere near that road, or any cut trees. Apparently the caretaker was unaware that we had driven around that end of the property the day before.

    My father was careful never to ask certain questions.

    Much later he admitted that he became worried we might see too much and not be allowed to leave. Apparently the county powers-that-be would not have tried very hard to find our bodies.

  13. #13
    JJB
    JJB is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    78

    very interesting thread............

    it is good to live here in our small town where we all seem like an extended family.... neighbors watch out for each other and such... i know those dark places do exist and i know i would have no idea how to get along in em......



    NOW IS ABSOLUTELY THE WRONG TIME TO TRY AND DISARM ME.........

  14. #14
    Vom Kriege's Avatar
    Vom Kriege is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by kansas_plainsman View Post
    Vom,

    Interesting story about your father. What was the situation that made it so dangerous? A strike? Corrupt local government?

    It calls to mind a situation when I was a boy. My family owned some land in rural Arkansas. My father took me with him to check on it. He had been made aware of the fact that the caretaker was 'in' with a large lumbering operation, which was highjacking wallnut off that land.

    The caretaker took us in the south end through some of the roughest ground in Arkansas. The lumber road came in the north end and was flat as a table. For some reason he never got around to taking us anywhere near that road, or any cut trees. Apparently the caretaker was unaware that we had driven around that end of the property the day before.

    My father was careful never to ask certain questions.

    Much later he admitted that he became worried we might see too much and not be allowed to leave. Apparently the county powers-that-be would not have tried very hard to find our bodies.

    That's just the way it was there.

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

detroit no go areas

,

detroit no-go areas police

,

kansas city no-go area

,

no go areas detroit

Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1