Help me identify these guns

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    1. #1
      Junior Member AdamSC46's Avatar
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      Help me identify these guns

      My great grandfather passed away many years ago. He had some guns tucked away and my great grandmother recently decided to give them to us (his great grandchildren). So, my brother and I each get to choose one of these guns. My dad is in Pennsylvania visiting family and said he would bring them back. Here is a picture he took:



      I know it's not the best picture, but can anyone help me identify what these are?

    2. #2
      MLB
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      Pretty sure the handgun is a pellet gun.

    3. #3
      Senior Member James NM's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by MLB View Post
      Pretty sure the handgun is a pellet gun.
      Yea, and I think the other 3 are long guns.

      You know Adam, you can get a wealth of info by just reading what's written on the guns - a lot more than we can ascertain from looking at that picture.

      For what it's worth, I believe the top three are shotguns.

    4. #4
      Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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      The topmost shotgun is most likely a Remington, but I can't be sure.
      The middle long gun is an inexpensive rifle-and-shotgun over/under, probably a .410 in the bottom barrel, probably a Savage.
      The bottom shotgun, just above the pellet pistol, is an Ithaca.
      The handgun is a Crossman or Benjamin, pump-up pellet pistol. (Most likely it's a Crossman.)

    5. #5
      Junior Member AdamSC46's Avatar
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      Yeah, I was guessing two of the long guns were pump action 12 gauges and the one in the middle was an over-under 20 gauge. But I didn't know what the pistol was. I looked at the picture again after MLB mentioned that the pistol was a pellet gun and I can see that. I would tell you what is written on the guns, but they are 1500 miles away. I didn't know if there were people here that were good enough to identify specifically what they were just by looking at the picture. Wishful thinking, I realize. But thanks for the help. I think I'll tell him to grab the two top guns and we'll see what they are when they get here.

    6. #6
      Junior Member AdamSC46's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
      The topmost shotgun is most likely a Remington, but I can't be sure.
      The middle long gun is an inexpensive rifle-and-shotgun over/under, probably a .410 in the bottom barrel, probably a Savage.
      The bottom shotgun, just above the pellet pistol, is an Ithaca.
      The handgun is a Crossman or Benjamin, pump-up pellet pistol. (Most likely it's a Crossman.)
      Wow. Thanks! Any idea how old they are? I was guessing none of them are very valuable, especially knowing my great grandfather. I was just curious.

    7. #7
      Senior Member Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by AdamSC46 View Post
      Wow. Thanks! Any idea how old they are? I was guessing none of them are very valuable, especially knowing my great grandfather. I was just curious.
      Excepting the one I believe to be a Remington, all might date from any time between the 1950s through the 1980s.
      The possible Remington would be younger: say mid-1960s through the present.
      I have no idea of their value, but the Ithaca may be "collectable."

    8. #8
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      Quote Originally Posted by AdamSC46 View Post
      My great grandfather passed away many years ago. He had some guns tucked away and my great grandmother recently decided to give them to us (his great grandchildren). So, my brother and I each get to choose one of these guns. My dad is in Pennsylvania visiting family and said he would bring them back. Here is a picture he took:



      I know it's not the best picture, but can anyone help me identify what these are?
      Here are my educated guesses:

      - Remington model 870 Wingmaster pump-action shotgun, probably a 12 gauge with a 2-3/4" chamber. I had one very similar to this several decades ago. Might be a 16 gauge rather than a 12; these were very popular, almost the equal of the twelves in the late 60s/early 70s.

      - Stevens (possibly Savage) over-under .22 rifle/.410 shotgun. It might be an early 22-410 Tenite from Stevens, or a Savage model 24B (one was very similar to the other). If the forend is plastic (can't tell for sure in the photo), then it's probably the Stevens, but the Tenite stock was probably broken and replaced with the cheaper and easier-to-find Savage stock. If the forend is just a darker-color wood, then it's probably the Savage, but there are many sub-models in this series, so the 24B is just a guess based on how common they were. Button on the right side of receiver is slid up to fire the top barrel, and down to fire the bottom (selector broke fairly regularly when gun was used a lot). Hammer must be manually cocked for each shot.

      - Ithaca model 37 pump-action shotgun, probably a 12 gauge, and if so, definitely a 2-3/4 inch chamber. I currently own one of these; had it passed-down to me when my grandfather died. Like the Remington, this might also be a 16 gauge; too hard to tell from the photo. Gun is fairly unique in that it is loaded AND ejects empty shells through the port on the bottom of the receiver.

      - I concur with the Crossman/Benjamin guesses. Probably a .177 caliber multi-pump model with a rotary loading port on the top tube (barrel). Put safety "on" and pump it up, say, 8 times (don't get your fingers pinched between the pump handle and the cylinder tube!); twist/pull the bolt to the rear to cock the mechanism and open the loading port, place a pellet in the port, close the bolt, move safety to "off", pull trigger. Repeat. I owned a Benjamin like this one in my youth; different grips and a wooden pump handle, but otherwise very similar.

    9. #9
      Member kg333's Avatar
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      Ditto to all the info on the third shotgun provided by Steve and DJ. It's an Ithaca 37 for sure. I received one in a similar fashion not long ago, and several people provided info on it and manuals for it in this thread:
      Ithaca Model 37 and Lee-Enfield

      The one in my thread dates from about the 1960s, and from appearances, it looks like yours might be older...could be collectible, I'm not sure.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ithaca_37

      Interesting tidbit about Ithacas: I have a friend whose father owns an older Ithaca, and she herself has a newer one. She shoots trap, and found out that newer Ithacas are not made as sturdily (pressed parts vs. cut parts or some such), so the older Ithacas are both considerably more reliable and valuable than the new models.

      KG

    10. #10
      Junior Member AdamSC46's Avatar
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      Thank you all for the info. I'm hoping to get the Ithaca, but not because it might be more valuable. I don't plan on selling whatever gun I end up with. The Ithaca just sounds kind of interesting.

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