View Poll Results: Who is the more usefull person?

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  • 100% storage ,10% application

    1 16.67%
  • 10% storage ,100% application

    5 83.33%
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  1. #1
    hawcer's Avatar
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    Question Who is more usefull?

    Who is more usefull...a person that can use 100% of their brain but can only apply 10% of it... Or a person that can only use 10% of their brain,but can apply 100% of it?

  2. #2
    Root's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hawcer View Post
    Who is more usefull...a person that can use 100% of their brain but can only apply 10% of it... Or a person that can only use 10% of their brain,but can apply 100% of it?
    Let me throw it back at you
    Would you rather be a jack of all trades, and a master of none?
    OR be an expert at one? (something tells me in the real world, this should yield more $)
    Bri

  3. #3
    hawcer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Root View Post
    Let me throw it back at you
    Would you rather be a jack of all trades, and a master of none?
    OR be an expert at one? (something tells me in the real world, this should yield more $)
    Bri
    You are correct in thinking someone that is an expert in one field should make more $ .....it's too bad they are the ones getting the shaft and being replaced by younger, less expirienced workers so the companies can save a buck.

    ...Which pushes us into the jack-of-whatever job you can get field.

    But,I would say I am a Jack-of-all-trades by nature...I would get extremely bored if i could only do one thing.

  4. #4
    Snowman's Avatar
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    Realize that the two are mathematically equivalent. Each can use 10% of the whole.

  5. #5
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    I would think what was stored and used might cause one to discount value accordingly.

    100% of nothing remains nothing.


  6. #6
    Root's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowman View Post
    Realize that the two are mathematically equivalent. Each can use 10% of the whole.
    Not really, think of it like a computer.
    100 gig hard drive with a pentium 1 processor
    or
    10 gig hard drive with some kind of really fast chip (I don't know much about computers- guess I should have come up with a better analogy)
    Bri

  7. #7
    hawcer's Avatar
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    The wheels are a turnin'....

    Lets put it another way.

    Light bulb "A" consumes 100 units of energy and produces 10% of that energy into light. 100x10%= 10 units of light

    Light bulb "B" consumes 10 units of energy and produces 100% of that energy into light. 10x100%= 10 units of light

    But,one could argue...

    Farmer "A" has 100 sheep but will only show his best 10%
    Farmer "B" only has 10 sheep and will show 100% of his sheep.

    So I ask again...which is more usefull?










    BTW...I'm trying my hardest to keep from losing my 10%

    This is not a trick question....it is really a "point of view" sort of thing. I just find It fun to jump start the brain every so often.

  8. #8
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    I've heard it said many times that the average person only uses about 10% of their brains ability to begin with, so I think if someone could run that 10% to max capacity, they'd be a pretty sharp cookie.

  9. #9
    Liko81 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by RightTurnClyde View Post
    I've heard it said many times that the average person only uses about 10% of their brains ability to begin with, so I think if someone could run that 10% to max capacity, they'd be a pretty sharp cookie.
    A common myth, and an oversimplification. The entire brain is not a databank, nor a processor. The cerebellum is the primitive brain that controls basic body functions; most of the unconscious stuff. The cerebrum is largely taken up with the storage of sense data. Every millisecond thousands of images, sounds and sensations are received and processed by your brain. There is only a rudimentary logic to this storage; certain areas deal with different sense memories, but other than that, your brain severs the weakest neural pathways it can find and reconnects it to store the new data. This leads to common writing and rewriting of the same neurons; short-term memory. Pathways on the other hand that are reinforced and strengthened through common use become part of your long-term memory.

    At any given time, neurons are firing willy-nilly to store and overwrite this sense data. However, only a small part of the firmly-established pathways are being used; that is, they are sending/receiving traffic. This is pretty logical; how much of your computer's hard drive is precious memories and important financial data files you rarely look at, versus the cache folder that Internet Explorer uses to store junk you only ever look at once? On a more general level, even given the most powerful computer, how much of your hard drive are you ever accessing at one time?

    If the part of the computer responsible for IDE and SATA (the front-side bus) were flooded with data from the hard drive, it would have no capacity left for RAM, CPU and graphics data transfer, and those components would also be flooded and have no capacity for working with the data. The brain doesn't work the same way, but the concept is similar; if 100% of your brain's neurons were firing, the major nerve trunks would be saturated with chemical signals, and would be unable to retransmit all of them. What would come through would be a garbled heap. In addition, uncontrolled firing of neurons triggers the firing of other neurons out-of-sequence, like a computer trying to open an executable file and start executing instructions beginning halfway through the file. This causes seizures. More general and chronic failures by the brain to create and follow neural pathways create diseases like autism.

    Quite simply, our brain does not and cannot efficiently work at 100%.

  10. #10
    hawcer's Avatar
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    Liko81 wins!!!

  11. #11
    Todd is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liko81 View Post
    A common myth, and an oversimplification. The entire brain is not a databank, nor a processor. The cerebellum is the primitive brain that controls basic body functions; most of the unconscious stuff. The cerebrum is largely taken up with the storage of sense data. Every millisecond thousands of images, sounds and sensations are received and processed by your brain. There is only a rudimentary logic to this storage; certain areas deal with different sense memories, but other than that, your brain severs the weakest neural pathways it can find and reconnects it to store the new data. This leads to common writing and rewriting of the same neurons; short-term memory. Pathways on the other hand that are reinforced and strengthened through common use become part of your long-term memory.

    At any given time, neurons are firing willy-nilly to store and overwrite this sense data. However, only a small part of the firmly-established pathways are being used; that is, they are sending/receiving traffic. This is pretty logical; how much of your computer's hard drive is precious memories and important financial data files you rarely look at, versus the cache folder that Internet Explorer uses to store junk you only ever look at once? On a more general level, even given the most powerful computer, how much of your hard drive are you ever accessing at one time?

    If the part of the computer responsible for IDE and SATA (the front-side bus) were flooded with data from the hard drive, it would have no capacity left for RAM, CPU and graphics data transfer, and those components would also be flooded and have no capacity for working with the data. The brain doesn't work the same way, but the concept is similar; if 100% of your brain's neurons were firing, the major nerve trunks would be saturated with chemical signals, and would be unable to retransmit all of them. What would come through would be a garbled heap. In addition, uncontrolled firing of neurons triggers the firing of other neurons out-of-sequence, like a computer trying to open an executable file and start executing instructions beginning halfway through the file. This causes seizures. More general and chronic failures by the brain to create and follow neural pathways create diseases like autism.

    Quite simply, our brain does not and cannot efficiently work at 100%.
    My brain hurts after reading that.

  12. #12
    niadhf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Root View Post
    Let me throw it back at you
    Would you rather be a jack of all trades, and a master of none?
    OR be an expert at one? (something tells me in the real world, this should yield more $)
    Bri
    daffynition of an expert - One who knows more and more about less and less until he/she knows aboslutely everything about absolutely nothing.


    Liko81
    What he said.(i'm so confused)

  13. #13
    Fred40 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liko81 View Post
    A common myth, and an oversimplification. The entire brain is not a databank, nor a processor. The cerebellum is the primitive brain that controls basic body functions; most of the unconscious stuff. The cerebrum is largely taken up with the storage of sense data. Every millisecond thousands of images, sounds and sensations are received and processed by your brain. There is only a rudimentary logic to this storage; certain areas deal with different sense memories, but other than that, your brain severs the weakest neural pathways it can find and reconnects it to store the new data. This leads to common writing and rewriting of the same neurons; short-term memory. Pathways on the other hand that are reinforced and strengthened through common use become part of your long-term memory.

    At any given time, neurons are firing willy-nilly to store and overwrite this sense data. However, only a small part of the firmly-established pathways are being used; that is, they are sending/receiving traffic. This is pretty logical; how much of your computer's hard drive is precious memories and important financial data files you rarely look at, versus the cache folder that Internet Explorer uses to store junk you only ever look at once? On a more general level, even given the most powerful computer, how much of your hard drive are you ever accessing at one time?

    If the part of the computer responsible for IDE and SATA (the front-side bus) were flooded with data from the hard drive, it would have no capacity left for RAM, CPU and graphics data transfer, and those components would also be flooded and have no capacity for working with the data. The brain doesn't work the same way, but the concept is similar; if 100% of your brain's neurons were firing, the major nerve trunks would be saturated with chemical signals, and would be unable to retransmit all of them. What would come through would be a garbled heap. In addition, uncontrolled firing of neurons triggers the firing of other neurons out-of-sequence, like a computer trying to open an executable file and start executing instructions beginning halfway through the file. This causes seizures. More general and chronic failures by the brain to create and follow neural pathways create diseases like autism.

    Quite simply, our brain does not and cannot efficiently work at 100%.
    Nice response.....you beat me to it

  14. #14
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    MLB
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    I'm not entirely sure if this is pertenent to your question, but your post reminded me of a quote of C. Coolidge that seems in the same vein:

    "Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence.
    Talent will not; nothing in the world is more common than unsuccessful men with talent.
    Genius will not; unrewarded genius is a proverb.
    Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts.
    Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent."
    ~ Calvin Coolidge
    That being said, I'd rather have a little done well, than lots of poorly thought out works.

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