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Thread: necessary?

  1. #1
    boatdoc173 is offline Member
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    necessary?

    Hi Folks

    I was fortunate enough to have a Wilson combat CQB offered to me(and my wife ok'd the early BD present--LOL)--a new neve rfired CQB .45 acp
    could not refus e the offer---LOL

    anyway having read the manual and the guide provided for maintenance-- I am a bit out of sorts. I usually do a field strip, clean and relube(oil only)of all my guns after each range session--BUT the long manual discusses removing parts like extractors, firing pins, firing pin blocks... I am wondering if this is needed all the time -- or at all--todays guns are so efficient and sealed so well that I never thought of cleaning these areas in my guns --period.. so far no issues with any gun and taking down a gun like Wilson Combat suggests leave lots of room for errors and extra parts when done--LOL

    any opinions or thoughts>

  2. #2
    barrelslime's Avatar
    barrelslime is offline Junior Member
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    All of my 1911's get a once a year total strip down and ultra sonic cleaning.
    I do field clean them after each use. Field strip, light oil of parts and toothbrush the internal parts to remove burnt powder and soot. Now if you intend to put 5000 rounds a month thru your 1911, I'd clean it much more often.

  3. #3
    desertman is offline Senior Member
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    boatdoc173:
    The 1911 is one of the easiest guns to completely take apart. It can also be done without tools. How often you do this depends on how many rounds you put through it. Take your time and become familiar with the complete take down procedure, it really is not that difficult. People who know their guns inside and out are always better off than those who just shoot them and forget about them.
    tony pasley likes this.

  4. #4
    boatdoc173 is offline Member
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    @desertman- I hope you are right-- when I bought my first 1911--it seemed daunting just to filed strip it--now it is easy... so I will use the youtube videos as a guide when I decide to detail strip and clean 2x yearly

    again thank you for the info guys

    happy shooting

  5. #5
    dakota1911's Avatar
    dakota1911 is offline Junior Member
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    I do field strip and clean after each range session, but a detail strip is after shooting a lot. Often I pull the firing pin and spring and check that area. If it is really dirty, then I go on with a detail strip and clean.

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    boatdoc173 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by desertman View Post
    boatdoc173:
    The 1911 is one of the easiest guns to completely take apart. It can also be done without tools. How often you do this depends on how many rounds you put through it. Take your time and become familiar with the complete take down procedure, it really is not that difficult. People who know their guns inside and out are always better off than those who just shoot them and forget about them.
    @Dman-- I agree but like a glock take down--if you have never done so it looks daunting-- and like the first time you field strip a 1911-- it is simple --as long as you have youtube ready to help--LOL

    thanks

    Rob

  7. #7
    boatdoc173 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by dakota1911 View Post
    I do field strip and clean after each range session, but a detail strip is after shooting a lot. Often I pull the firing pin and spring and check that area. If it is really dirty, then I go on with a detail strip and clean.
    that I can do @Dakota--the big detailed stripping is not in my range of skills yet. maybe with youtube as a teacher I can do it-- the issue with me is left over parts--like the vacuum I "fixed". Except with a gun it is not acceptable--LOL

    thanks

  8. #8
    Spike12's Avatar
    Spike12 is offline Member
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    My 'take to the range' guns do not get cleaned everytime. I feel that they are able to run for 1K rounds or more w/o suffering the wear of a take down. My carry gun, 1911 commander, is a different story.

    But when I do clean them, its field strip with a good cleaning of the big parts (I'm a FrogLube guy so cleaning is real easy) and then a good hosing down with G96 of the trigger works followed by 100PSI of compressed air, grips removed. Mags get a cleaning too (I've found grips of a new gun incredibly gunky inside).

    "If you take either a VW or a Rochester carb apart and back together enough times you'll eventually have two of them."

  9. #9
    rglassma is offline Junior Member
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    I think it has a great deal to do with how much you shoot, and how much free time you have in your life. For the 1911 platform, I have been told by gunsmith professionals in the field with decades of experience with 1911s that these guns can go many hundreds of rounds without much attention. I usually clean mine every 2-300 rounds. I have never totally stripped one down to bare bones, and don't plan to. If you are not extremely familiar with the platform, and you have a very expensive gun (as you do), I would find a qualified gunsmith in your area, or contact Wilson directly to get their take. Until you are more familiar with total take down of the gun, I wouldn't mess with it by using any online video. If you really want to get into that level of expertise with your 1911, I would investigate a hands on class in your area before attempting something like that with no supervision.

  10. #10
    casurvivor is offline Junior Member
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    screw driver for the grips, punch and hammer for the main spring housing, if you don't call those tools I don't know.

  11. #11
    CW's Avatar
    CW
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    Normally no more than simple tear down per owners manual. Centerfires normally clean fine at this level.

    Removing grip panels and cleaning mags are part of a good cleaning too.

    Rimfires tend to require deeper cleaning which I do with a spray lubricant [with pipette] a couple times or until most of the crud is gone.
    A plastic dental pic can get those hard to clean spots.
    (check your LGS for cleaners of this type as WD40 is not a good choice for firearms).

    Once I'm drifting pins out, its because something broke or needs to be upgraded.

  12. #12
    boatdoc173 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by CW View Post
    Normally no more than simple tear down per owners manual. Centerfires normally clean fine at this level.

    Removing grip panels and cleaning mags are part of a good cleaning too.

    Rimfires tend to require deeper cleaning which I do with a spray lubricant [with pipette] a couple times or until most of the crud is gone.
    A plastic dental pic can get those hard to clean spots.
    (check your LGS for cleaners of this type as WD40 is not a good choice for firearms).

    Once I'm drifting pins out, its because something broke or needs to be upgraded.
    THanks CW-- along with your post ,I read someone with some years on him(over 75) relate that he ha s used some guns for over 30 years-- then one day decided to do a detailed strip of most of his guns--and surprise-- the internals were very clean(striker, extractor...) . your post and his advice (to all of us) make me think that a good basic field strip is all that is needed most of the time--unless as you said--a part needs to be replaced--then of course cleaning can be done while the repair is being performed. I use break free and rand clp for cleaning and basic lube. I re lube my guns with any of the following : super-lube multi synthetic liquid, mil comm mc 2300, fp 10 m7 pro, slip 2000 gun lube. I alternate my products . I have stopped using grease. These synthetic oils produce a ball bearing like feel to the guns when manipulated by hand and no rust or any other issue shave been noted


    have a great day--shoot safely

    rob

  13. #13
    CW's Avatar
    CW
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    Yea, it seems we may over clean at times, but then the little boy in many of us just loves tearing things apart.

    For years I used Hoppes 9 for cleaning and Hoppes Gun oil afterwards. A friend showed me Froglube and once applied to my 1911 I was sold.

    But when applied to my PX4...... in the winter..... the firing pin froze. OK, after a good cleaning we got back to working fine on Hoppes.

    I did a bit more study of Froglube an it appears a hot application (heat the metal up or chose a nice summer day) works best and remove ANY extra.

    I still like the non-toxic attribute of Froglube, but with a Misquito that likes wet, seems I'll always have to use multiple clp's.

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