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Thread: Oiling My 1911

  1. #1
    Geoff's Avatar
    Geoff is offline Junior Member
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    Unhappy Oiling My 1911



    I finally bought my first 1911 pistol. I have a Rock Island Armory .45 and I love shooting it. Recently I learned how to field strip it , clean and oil it, then reassemble it. However last time I went shooting the pistol started to jam after about 60 rounds. I took it home, field stripped it, and noticed a lot of buildup and upon wiping it down, my cloth was black as night. I probably added too much oil last time I cleaned it, but now I have to ask, how much oil is enough to keep the pistol properly lubed and functioning properly?

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  3. #2
    VAMarine's Avatar
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    I really haven't found a "too much" point. I guess the big question is where were you noticing the build up?

    With the exception to brands, I tend to stick to the lubrication steps shown here:
    10-8 1911 Users Guide.

  4. #3
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    I have a Springer "Special Build"
    It loves running wet.
    The first few shots after a cleaning spray my shooting glasses with a film of oil.

    If I try dry, it occasionally jams.

    AFS

  5. #4
    tony pasley's Avatar
    tony pasley is online now Senior Member
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    I clean then oil then wipe leaving a film on it and have not had any problems with my RIA.

  6. #5
    gascheck is offline Junior Member
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    Lubing a 1911

    During the recent unpleasantness, Vietnam War, we were taught it being impossible to overlubricate a 1911. Yes excess oil picks up dust, dirt, sand and God knows what else, but the 1911 was built to perform under conditions others could not and it did and mostly does to this day.
    Pull the slide back and lock it open. Point the barrel at the floor and put one drop of quality oil in the machined groove on each side of the slide. Turn it one one side and put another drop of oil by the safety, turn it over and put another drop of oil on the opposite side from the safety. Put both drops of oil so they soak into the clearance between upper and lower receiver. Put one drop on the top of the barrel extending from the front bushing.
    Release upper receiver so the weapon goes into battery and locks. Put one drop on the barrel shroud and work the action several times. As the other gentleman said, if your shooting glasses have oil on the during the first few rounds, you're probably close to correct.
    Bought my first 1911 in 1969 and it was the first issue which had so many cracked frames, as my did also. Loved it then and love the damn things to this day. Have one on my hip right now--1911 series 70 Combat Commander. Very similar to the first thing I did upon becoming a civilian in 1972 was buy a blued Combat Commander.

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    mactex is offline Member
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    Great conversation so far as I'm a newby to the 1911 as well. In reading over the article and other points, I now have some questions.
    1. What/where exactly are the Radial Lug Recesses? I'm assuming these are the grooves in the slide that the barrel fits into when in battery.
    2. What is the Disconnector Head?
    3. The article says to "place a drop of oil in front of the hammer to lubricate the hammer hooks/sear nose contact." So, I just put a drop of oil where the hammer meets the frame? A picture would really help to clarify the statement.

    TIA

  8. #7
    VAMarine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mactex View Post
    Great conversation so far as I'm a newby to the 1911 as well. In reading over the article and other points, I now have some questions.
    1. What/where exactly are the Radial Lug Recesses? I'm assuming these are the grooves in the slide that the barrel fits into when in battery.
    2. What is the Disconnector Head?
    3. The article says to "place a drop of oil in front of the hammer to lubricate the hammer hooks/sear nose contact." So, I just put a drop of oil where the hammer meets the frame? A picture would really help to clarify the statement.

    TIA
    You're correct on #1.

    The disconnector head is just the top of the disconnector.

  9. #8
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    Great info in this thread, I also have a RIA 45 and love the way it shoots, seems that I can get away with just oiling it with some Remington oil and the gun just runs and runs. Now with my Kimber Pro TLE II I wasn't that lucky, oiling it did not help with the FTE from time to time, I believe its because the Kimber is a lot tighter gun the RIA, what I have found that works for me is to use a product from Shooter Choice, its a synthetic grease, and I have not had a FTE in over 800+ rounds, and the gun seems to cycle smoother then when its lubed with oil. Also the grease seems to not run and does not transfer to my clothes while I carry, like the oil has done in the past. Just my 2 cents.

  10. #9
    Geoff's Avatar
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    Thanks

    Thanks guys. I have not had time to mess with my gun since I posted, but I will have time in the near future to work with the pistol. I do not know if it means anything or not, but I traced my serial number and found out that the pistol was manufactured in 81 and probably has all origional parts yet so I ordered a new 17# recoil spring to replace the 16# stock one. Figured the original spring might be tired. Should be in any day now.

    Also, for all you 1911 fans who have an iPhone or iPod touch, there is an awesome app called Gun Disassembly 3D and it shows how to take apart a 1911 step by step and names the pieces. It is a load of fun.

  11. #10
    C1
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    Quote Originally Posted by hundojoe View Post
    I have found that works for me is to use a product from Shooter Choice, its a synthetic grease, and I have not had a FTE in over 800+ rounds, and the gun seems to cycle smoother then when its lubed with oil. Also the grease seems to not run and does not transfer to my clothes while I carry, like the oil has done in the past. Just my 2 cents.
    Try using a synthetic or synthetic blend high temp automotive/heavy equipment grease. It works well at a much lower price.

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