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  1. #1
    Bob Wright's Avatar
    Bob Wright is online now Senior Member
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    One hand racking the .45

    The Army's preferred carry of the M1999A1 was hammer down, empty chamber, loaded magazine. Drawing the pistol the left hand racked the slide with the pistol in a "hip shooting" crouched position. This was the Army way.

    Unauthorized, and barracks taught only, was a one handed method, using the old GI flap holster. The pistol was drawn partially up out of the holster and turned outward about ninety degrees. Then, rapidly forcing the pistol downward, the rear sight caught on the leather insert so that pushing downward sharply and jerking the pistol back out rapidly chambered a round and cocked the hammer.

    Flashy move. Never did this myself with live ammo, and certainly wouldn't recommend it. Only one I ever knew that claimed to have actually used it was a Cherokee Indian from North Carolina. Come to think of it, he did walk with a limp.

    Bob Wright

  2. #2
    2400's Avatar
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    Unless your weak arm is disabled I think this is a stupid idea. I've heard it for years and years and I'd hate to rely it for my personal protection or my families. Carrying cocked and locked is safer, easier plus then you're ready to go if the situation requires.

  3. #3
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    jwkimber45 is offline Senior Member
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    Condition 1 (aka 'cocked & locked') is how John Browning designed the 1911 to be carried. In fact his first designs were sans grip safety.

  4. #4
    Bob Wright's Avatar
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    I was just commenting on the practice. I certainly wasn't suggesting its use.

    It came about with too much time in the barracks. The idea ranks right up there with cutting an "X" on bullets noses to make them expanding, or using baby bottle nipples over the muzzle for a silencer! Or a silencer on the muzzle of a revolver.

    Bob Wright

  5. #5
    jwkimber45's Avatar
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    I know Bob, I worry about a newbie trying something like that out and getting themselves or someone else hurt....

  6. #6
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    Unauthorized, and barracks taught only, was a one handed method, using the old GI flap holster. The pistol was drawn partially up out of the holster and turned outward about ninety degrees. Then, rapidly forcing the pistol downward, the rear sight caught on the leather insert so that pushing downward sharply and jerking the pistol back out rapidly chambered a round and cocked the hammer.
    This technique was illustrated and recommended in The Handgunner's Guide, by Chic Gaylord, in the sixties. There were several photographs of a USAF Air Policeman who was assigned to the Armed Forces Police Detachment in NYC using this method to rack the slide of his 1911.

    Yes, I admit I tried it, too, a time or two, but with an unloaded pistol. (I was a lot younger and more foolish then). Never got up the nerve to try it with a loaded pistol, tho.

  7. #7
    Baldy's Avatar
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    Angry Insane!!!

    Typical Gov: BS though up by some pencil neck General who never seen combat.

  8. #8
    2400's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baldy
    Typical Gov: BS though up by some pencil neck General who never seen combat.
    Or a REMF.

  9. #9
    milquetoast is offline Member
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    one hand racking

    Bad idea for daily carry -- Condition One is much safer than Condition Three -- but it's a useful thing to know for emergencies, like having one arm disabled. You can load, unload, or (more importantly) clear malfunctions by pushing the slide against a hard edge, like a table, doorway, or the heel of your shoe. Definitely for emergencies only.

    BTW, tying in with another thread, it's much harder to do this with a gun that has a recoil spring guide rod. With the standard recoil spring, you can push the recoil spring plug against a hard edge, but if you try that with a guide rod, it's not happening.

  10. #10
    Revolver's Avatar
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    We all know the old saying... "There's the right way then there's the Army way".

  11. #11
    ocharry is offline Junior Member
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    fellas,,, if you take any hand gun courses,, and you get past tac 1,,, they are going to show this to you and expect you to do it with a loaded gun... i have used the edge of the holster and the side of my leg,,the edge of my pants pocket,,along with some other places that would hook the rear sight.... i had a bruse the size of a coffee cup on my thy from doing it so many times one weekend,,, you just have to pay attention to what you are doing and keep your finger off the trigger,,,, not a normal thing to do ,,but it is good to know if you need it....and it works...just my .02 YMMV

    ocharry

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