View Poll Results: How many failures has your 1911 had since break-in?

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  • 0 - None, Nada, No Problems

    185 65.84%
  • 1 - 5

    56 19.93%
  • 6 - 10

    12 4.27%
  • 11 - 20

    8 2.85%
  • 20+ - I quit counting

    10 3.56%
  • Its a PITA/I had to sell it

    10 3.56%
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  1. #151
    Cat's Avatar
    Cat
    Cat is offline Member
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    Cuba, That is one of the best looking 1911 out their. Both of my colt's look just like that.

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  3. #152
    usmcj's Avatar
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    My 1911's are Colts, Sigs, Dan Wessons, and pre-seriesII Kimbers. In many years of owning 1911's, I've had no issues with any of the pistols, that were the fault of the pistols. I've had mag and ammo issues, but my 1911's have been trouble free.

  4. #153
    Raymond's Avatar
    Raymond is offline Junior Member
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    Well past break in period on both of my Kimbers (Covert and Ultra Carry II). No feed issues.

  5. #154
    stevehenry1 is offline Junior Member
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    The worst ever was a AMT Hardballer. Not only jam-a-matic but a break-aholic I have a Auto Ordnance that someone overhauled. It too was a jammer, until I removed the compensator-type barrel bushing. Now it's excellent. I have a Springer Companion that jammed a lot. I'm hoping I've found the problem. there was an off-color spot in the chamber. I finally had to polish it with a Dremel, felt pad, and rouge. I don't know what was there, but it so far it's running a lot better now. Whatever it was, Hoppe's and brush wouldn't touch it.

  6. #155
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    I've had four 1911 style .45s.

    I had a Star PD, a "small" alloy 1911 that I bought new in about 1979. But I was not ready for it and I would limp wrist and I got stovepipes all the time so I traded it in on a Colt Combat Commander (alloy commander). It was perfectly reliable but kicked too much, so I traded it in on an all steel Commander. It too was perfectly reliable and I kept it for a while. Then Colt came out with a Stainless Steel Gold Cup which would take full power loads (before that they were set up for semi-wadcutters). I bought that and kept it for about 15 years without ever a single hiccup.

    From my experience all the Colt manufactured 1911s have proven completely reliable and 100% durable with no parts breakage of any type.

    If I were to buy a 1911, I would buy a Colt.

  7. #156
    rex
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    Between 2 early SAs and a few Colts in over 20 years,none really.I have had stoppages on occasion with changing mags or a reload OAL,but nothing as far as malfunctions.One even reliably ate Speer's 200gr flying ashtray.It helps I know how to tune them though so I check things before I even shoot it.It seems alot of makers now don't know how to tune an extractor before shipping it out.

  8. #157
    BloodOmen911's Avatar
    BloodOmen911 is offline Junior Member
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    I have a Taurus PT1911. Never had a jam, just occasionally the hammer only gets half cocked. I think my trigger sear might need a little work? I'm not sure.

  9. #158
    Pistol Pete is offline Junior Member
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    I've have a few failures with handloads that we attributed to the loads. I've owned 5 1911's and the only one that wouldn't work out of the box was a Kimber. I had to dimple the slide stope to keep it from locking back on the next to last round. I've read since that this is a common failure with Kimber.

  10. #159
    Jammersix is offline Banned
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    My suggestion is that the raw number of failures is meaningless. It's the common mistake of reading only one side of the ledger-- what is needed is a ratio.

    For instance, a weapon that has had 21 failures in fifty rounds is in trouble.

    The same weapon, with the same 21 failures in 150,000 rounds is in pretty good shape.

    This is also the reason that when people say "I've never had a jam" I answer "shoot more."

  11. #160
    rex
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    I agree with that in...basis for lack of a better word now.I think knowledge and experience also comes into play.

    These forums have quite a few 'newbies',what-have-you that skew it also.Alot of shooters can't differentiate between a malfunction and a stoppage.

    I constantly hear of malfs and then they say they're shooting Hornady.They make top notch components but the ammo is lacking in quality,so technically if that's the only brand that doesn't work it's a stoppage.Reloads are the same gig that depends on bullet shape and AOL,vary either and problem cured.

    On the opposite side I'll bust on Kimber again.Their first generation were good guns and still sought after.From then on they went downhill with miscut feedramps,ill fit barrels,broken slidestops and other parts,extractors just thrown in and never checked for tensionetc.Top gunsmiths won't touch them for a serious build.It all comes down to pisspoor quality control of parts and build.These are pure malfunctions.

    The last statement is what I say about bikers,if you haven't gone down you are lying or haven't ridden long enough.It isn't a matter of if,it's when.If you're a hardcore it's innevitable,if you just dabble with it you may be lucky and never experience it.Guns are a little easier as you can measure wear and replace high wear items that will fail,but you can't tell when an animal or bluehair is going to kommakozie your butt.

  12. #161
    870ShellShucker's Avatar
    870ShellShucker is offline Junior Member
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    G.I.-loose" 1911s are completely reliable, even when not particularly clean.
    It's the "accurized," tight ones that fail if they're not kept clean obsessively.
    I had read this, and hopefully it helped me make a good choice recently. I went to purchase a Remington 1911R1, and was offered two to choose from.

    Example A had nicer looking grips (nicer looking wood grain), but not as nice of a parkerized finish.
    Example B was just the opposite.
    I inserted the magazines, worked the slides, tested the trigger pulls, the magazine releases, etc. for a good 10-15 minutes.
    Example A had an overall looser feel to it, and Example B was very tight.
    I chose Example A, and I have no regrets. I didn't want a long break-in period. I wanted some right now dependability.

  13. #162
    wayno's Avatar
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    Kimber II none!!!!

  14. #163
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    Highhawk1948 is offline Junior Member
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    Colt Commander, 21 Century Model, no problem shooting 7 boxes of all major brands. Love the gun.

  15. #164
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    No fte or ftf or stove pipes I think I covered it lol. however, this is no normal 1911 it is a .38 Super the magnum of the era! well it is used to me but, after firing close to 100 rounds down range it left a very nice feeling in my hand!

  16. #165
    rex
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    Actually it is a normal 1911.The only difference is the barrel,ejector,and the slide and internal parts are made for the narrower casehead.Same gun,some specs were changed to deal with a smaller case.The smaller firing pin has carried over to some 45s years ago.

  17. #166
    Jammersix is offline Banned
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    I've been watching this thread, and trying to form an answer.

    But I have several 1911s, and have sold several more.

    Some (small or tight) I sold because I gave up hope of ever making them work correctly. 1911s smaller than design have an operations envelope that is smaller at both ends than a standard, government model, and tight 1911s malfunction due to dirt before milspec. (All weapons generate residue that fouls weapons. The only question is when. Longer is better.)

    Others, I smiffed' until they ran correctly and reliably. A couple, the manufacturer fixed. Two have gone to smiths, including one nationally known smith. I don't really see any difference in the end product, outside of opinion. One or two, I haven't had to touch, they ran straight out of the box.

    The weapons that ran straight out of the box, and the weapons that ran the longest were Springfields. The weapons I had the most trouble with were 3-1/2" Officers models, followed by a Wilson government model. Someone else owns them, now.

    There was a Springfield Officer's model in which part of the recoil assembly left, and departed downrange, jamming the weapon so that it took tools to get it apart.

    When I'm in a match against a small or tight 1911, I smile. I know which students will need weapons help when I see those weapons.

    If I'm ever in a gunfight, I hope my opponent has a small, tight 1911.

    There will now be a wailing and gnashing of teeth by Wilson owners and Officer owners. Do carry on.

    Dance with the girl you brung.

    ~Jammer

  18. #167
    mustang652's Avatar
    mustang652 is offline Junior Member HGF Gold Member
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    I marked the zero, but reckon I better qualify that score. Due to the age of the gun I only fire it on rare occasion. My Colt 1911, mfg in 1945, is nearly a year older than I am and on those rare occasions I have taken it to the range I've never had a problem.
    USAF, Retired- Let's limit all US politicians to two terms, One in office - One in prison.

  19. #168
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    My colt has had a few last month when I put a heavy recoil spring and loaded bullets to low velocity. that is my bad.

    My sig sauer scorpion will jam every 5th or so round if I load bullets to 1.232 oal, but if I load them to 1.23 oal they are flawless.

  20. #169
    gandog56 is offline Junior Member
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    About the only failure I remember in my Springfield Armory 1911A1 GI was totally my fault. I was shooting my reloads and probably put in a double charge in one. Blew one of the grips off, blew out the mag bottom, and put a big old bulge in the barrel. Which really kind of turned into a lucky thing. I had a gunsmith put in a new Wilson Combat match grade barrel and bushing, and my group sizes just about halved themselves.

    Serendipity strikes.

  21. #170
    rex
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    If you bulged the barrel it was an obstruction,like booting one off after a squib.If it was a double charge things come apart at the chamber,sideways and down.Progressive press?

    Edit to add: What powder was it?I suppose a slow powder could bulge the barrel,but I'd expect to see slide damage under those circumstances.

  22. #171
    Jammersix is offline Banned
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    He's talking about a 1911. An obstruction or a bulged barrel wouldn't necessarily damage the slide.

  23. #172
    m1ghtysauc3's Avatar
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    Re: How many Failures have you had with your 1911?

    My Springfield MC Operator has several hundred rounds through it with zero failures of any kind.

  24. #173
    870ShellShucker's Avatar
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    The 1911 in .45 Auto is a true Classic, if there ever was one.

    So is the Remington 870, btw.

  25. #174
    rex
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jammersix View Post
    He's talking about a 1911. An obstruction or a bulged barrel wouldn't necessarily damage the slide.
    I missed that until this popped back up,that doesn't make sense.

    He's talking about a 1911,and the slide survived,as I stated it's most likely he booted one behind an obstruction.A double of a certain load may be that mild but normally the slide takes a hit.

  26. #175
    oak1971's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jammersix View Post
    I've been watching this thread, and trying to form an answer.

    But I have several 1911s, and have sold several more.

    Some (small or tight) I sold because I gave up hope of ever making them work correctly. 1911s smaller than design have an operations envelope that is smaller at both ends than a standard, government model, and tight 1911s malfunction due to dirt before milspec. (All weapons generate residue that fouls weapons. The only question is when. Longer is better.)

    Others, I smiffed' until they ran correctly and reliably. A couple, the manufacturer fixed. Two have gone to smiths, including one nationally known smith. I don't really see any difference in the end product, outside of opinion. One or two, I haven't had to touch, they ran straight out of the box.

    The weapons that ran straight out of the box, and the weapons that ran the longest were Springfields. The weapons I had the most trouble with were 3-1/2" Officers models, followed by a Wilson government model. Someone else owns them, now.

    There was a Springfield Officer's model in which part of the recoil assembly left, and departed downrange, jamming the weapon so that it took tools to get it apart.

    When I'm in a match against a small or tight 1911, I smile. I know which students will need weapons help when I see those weapons.

    If I'm ever in a gunfight, I hope my opponent has a small, tight 1911.

    There will now be a wailing and gnashing of teeth by Wilson owners and Officer owners. Do carry on.

    Dance with the girl you brung.

    ~Jammer
    Still waiting for my uber tight Les Baer to turn into the jamm-o-matic you describe. Six years, 10,000 rounds and counting.....

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