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  1. #1
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    Gun oil for Para 1911?

    My Nite Hawg came oiled with a pretty thick lubricant that I would call grease instead of oil. The included oil was thick as well and was white. Do 1911s require a different kind of oil than other guns?

  2. #2
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Probably has Teflon or Moly (molybdenum sulfide) in it.
    Government Models like to have a little lubrication of a clingy nature on their slide rails, and where the slide rides over the disconnector and hammer. Also where slide and barrel connect (rear locking area, front bushing area).
    Not much. Better to use too little and replace it often than to use too much.
    You might also use a little on the hammer pin and where the mainspring strut pivots inside the hammer. Maybe a tiny bit among the sear/disconnector internal parts, too.

  3. #3
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    According to the tube, it is Mil-comm TW-258. I don't use a lot of it, but if I should be using a thicker oil than my Hoppe's #9, then I should be using a thicker oil than my Hoppe's #9.

  4. #4
    Old Padawan's Avatar
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    I have been using Rigs stainless steel grease on the slide rails. It works great but requires a bit more cleaning between shoots than oil. I donít know that this is needed on poly framed guns, but I would recommend it on any gun wit a lot of steel to steel contact.
    "Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it." -Mark Twain

  5. #5
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    Mine has an aluminum frame, which is closer to steel than polymer. I did notice the inside of the gun got extremely dirty, even after a 50-round shoot at the range, but I'd rather have it get really dirty and need constantly cleaning than use too light of an oil and jam when I need it. Is the Rig's stuff designed specifically for guns, or is it just a basic grease for metals?

  6. #6
    kenn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fivehourfrenzy View Post
    My Nite Hawg came oiled with a pretty thick lubricant that I would call grease instead of oil. The included oil was thick as well and was white. Do 1911s require a different kind of oil than other guns?

    Dude! get some Purell right now! That's not oil!

  7. #7
    Mike Barham's Avatar
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    When I shot 1911s, I just lubed them with whatever oil was on sale. Hoppes, Break-Free, Rem Oil, whatever. They ran fine.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenn View Post

    Dude! get some Purell right now! That's not oil!

  9. #9
    Old Padawan's Avatar
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    The Riggs is a grease made for guns. Its primary intent was stainless guns, but it works well on alloy as well. I mentioned the poly guns not needing it due to the minimal contact the slide rails make with the frame.

    My brother in law swears by this stuff. I started using it a couple of years ago. Its good stuff, but unlike oil it needs a good clean removal and replacement.

    Prior to using this I used whatever oil I had on hand. They all worked. This is just what I am using now.
    "Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it." -Mark Twain

  10. #10
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    I guess just to be safe I could give Para a call and see what they recommend.

  11. #11
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    The thing to keep in mind with 1911's is that you CAN over oil them. You can do a couple of things.
    1. Buy a buffer for the recoil spring and not worry about it.
    2. Check to see if you are getting frame impact where slide meets frame behind the recoil spring and rod. If you are, you might be over oiling or using +P too often. Granted, you are going to get some frame impact but run a marker over it (it's inside the gun so don't worry) and shoot 7-8 rounds, check for impacts. If it's really pounding the crap out of it, either up your mainspring by a pound, buy a buffer, don't use as much oil, or all listed.

    Now, to see if you are having the opposite problem, go to range. Load magazine, but do not rack slide. Just pull it far enough back so that the hammer is about to half cock. Release slide. If it doesn't return quickly, as in "click", you may be using too thick of an oil or grease. If it returns quickly, your fine. The reason you need a loaded magazine in there is so that the spring pressure is pressing against the bottom of the slide.

    These are not "scientific" by any means, but they are things that I look for. When people start getting FTF's it is usually because of one of three things.

    1. Bad or incorrect ammo for gun. (feed ramp)
    2. Dirty gun. (frame to frame or feed ramp)
    3. Weak or worn out recoil spring.

    When people start getting FTE's, it can be a couple of different things.
    1. Dirty extractor. (if you've never taken the pistol down to the extractor, be careful, it's fun and frustrating at the same time, but it does get dirty)
    2. Dirty gun. (frame to frame grime, or over oiled which gathers gunk)
    3. Ugly box of Wolf ammo near by. (pick up the box and put a rock in it, throw it at the user) *opinion*
    4. Dirty breach face. (Clean it with a scraper, get in the corners).


    Come to think of it, the Para uses a double recoil spring doesn't it? If it does, I dont' think there are buffers available to you. I think the recommended spring replacement for double recoil springs is like 500 rounds, which is VERY conservative. They'll probably last you 4 to 10 times that, but it never hurts to have a spare for if your guns starts acting 'wonky' (wonky not honky! hehe).

    Enjoy.

    Zhur

  12. #12
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    I haven't been having any problems with the gun cycling. I had a few FTFs during break-in, but since I've passed the 300-round mark, no problems. Para recommends using standard pressure 230gr loads, but IMO the standard pressure 230gr loads are going way too slow out of a 3" barrel. The tech rep said that the gun should do fine with any sub-230gr +P loads, however it was designed around a standard pressure 230gr load, so if it has cycling issues with anything but, it's "not their fault." However, the 185gr +P and 200gr +P loads have ran flawlessly, and the only jams I've had during break-in were standard pressure 230gr FMJs. The Hawg feeds every JHP I run through it, and has only jammed on FMJs (since break-in was completed).

    The recoil spring is super stiff, and the low recoil of the standard pressure 230gr loads (during break-in) would sometimes fail to fully blow the slide back so it had enough momentum coming forward to fully chamber a round. Lighter loads fixed that problem.

  13. #13
    Mike Barham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zhurdan View Post
    1. Buy a buffer for the recoil spring and not worry about it...buy a buffer...
    These tacked-on widgets are at best useless and at worst dangerous. Read the highly knowledgeable John Farnam's opinion on them here: http://www.defense-training.com/quips/13Feb08.html.
    Employed by Galco Gunleather - www.galcogunleather.com / Veteran OEF VIII

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  14. #14
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    Don't worry, I won't be using a buffer. I don't even know what one is.

  15. #15
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    I like Gunslick Graphite Lube, but just like Old Padawan was saying, it does require more cleaning.

    -Jeff-

  16. #16
    revolvers&w is offline Junior Member
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    3 in 1 ?
    Do they still make it?

  17. #17
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Yup.
    It's in your local hardware store.
    (It's merely repackaged, good-quality, 20-weight motor oil. Says so, right on the package.)

  18. #18
    NGIB is offline Member
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    I've been using Mobil 1 on all my guns for quite a while now. At $5 per quart it goes a long way...

  19. #19
    Dredd is offline Member
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    Basically anything is good and you should do a little field strip and quick once over with some lube every once in a while after it's not been fired. After each range session clean and re-lube.

    Personally I clean and lube with Weaponshield. Haven't found anything better. All of my guns get weaponshield. My 1911s, HKs, Glocks, Rifles, & Shotguns.

  20. #20
    DevilsJohnson is offline Senior Member
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    I use Tetra Gun Grease on the rails of all my 1911's. It seems to hold up to heat better than a light machine oil. It's great for guns I"m putting up for a while too. It don't drt out over time for guns spending time in the dark.

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