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  1. #1
    Torquem's Avatar
    Torquem is offline Junior Member
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    May 2007
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    Forgive my ignorance...

    I was at the gun shop today looking at an FNP-40. I really liked everything about the gun. My question is more of a general question in regards to a da/sa decocker. All of the pistols I have owned were SAO with the exception of my HK (whic has the LEM).
    My question is... what is the purpose of a decocker? How does one safely carry one in the chamber with this setup?
    I am a bit ignorant with this type of SA/DA setup so please be gentle lol
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Dave James is offline Junior Member
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    Torg, normally the "decocker" is a safety interrupt as it where. In SIG's it is designed to drop the hammer back to the longer trigger pull of the DA,

    It catches the hammer at mid point and lowers it, kind of like the old safety move of placing your thumb in front of the hammer on SA's and then lowering it.

    It is just the way of removing human error in doing it for one self, and allowing the machined/ stamped parts to work for you.

  3. #3
    Torquem's Avatar
    Torquem is offline Junior Member
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    So how would one safely carry one in the chamber on the SA/DA FNP-40? Or is it simply that if you pull the trigger the gun will go off period?
    What about the SA models? Can they be carried cocked and locked?
    Thanks for the info!

  4. #4
    arkansas72212 is offline Junior Member
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    I have a FNP9 that I carry with a round in the chamber and decocked. When I load the round, I use the decoker to lower the hammer and then remove the magazine, add another round and reinsert the magazine. With this method I have 16 rounds in the magazine and 1 in the chamber. With the round in the chamber and the gun properly hostered (so that the trigger is covered), I feel very safe carrying the gun. The DA trigger pull is pretty heavy (10-13 lbs), so it will not be pulled accidently as long as the gun is holstered properly. My other gun is a Kimber CDP Custom II that I carry cocked and locked and I am more "nervous" about that set up than with my FNP9, although with a snap strap between the hammer and firing pin I feel pretty safe.

  5. #5
    Magicmanmb's Avatar
    Magicmanmb is offline Member
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    cocked and locked dangerous for pistol desgnrf for da/sa

    With the improvement of firing pin safeties it's safer to be carried da/sa as it is for cocked and locked. I know Jeff Cooper amd Elmer Keith would have me burn in hell for this. But these day most people don't practice enough to safely carry C & L. Also for their time these were great guys.. But the .45 is not the be all end all. And I can remember when they said "Plastic" pistols would never be popular. I like my FN9 and my P 99 almost as much as any weapon iv'e ever owned..

  6. #6
    Revolver's Avatar
    Revolver is offline Member
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    Anyone who cannot safely carry a SA automatic cannot safely carry anything else. A disregard for the four safety rules is very dangerous with any platform.

    The safe way to carry a DA/SA pistol is with the hammer down, or hammer down with decocker on(if applicable and is optional if applicable), or with hammer cocked with safety on(if applicable like CZ 75 pattern pistols).

    Also:
    READ YOUR MANUAL when you get it.

  7. #7
    mvslay is offline Junior Member
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    +1 Revolver
    Absolutely read your manual.

    There should pobably be a fifth rule added to the four that reads something like this:
    Know, understand, and be able to explain the designers intended function of all safety systems on all makes and models of firarms you own or shoot.

    It's kind of like having a car and knowing how the seat belts are meant to work. Just basic info required to operate safely.

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