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Thread: Why are Colts THE gun to own?

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    Why are Colts THE gun to own?

    Why are Colts (specifically revolvers and semi-automatics) THE gun to own?

    Please educated a tupper ware shooter. Thanks!

  2. #2
    gmaske's Avatar
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    I'll take a bit of a stab. The early Colt Snake revolvers are a work of art as were many of their other revolvers and pistols. They also are kind of the grandfather of the 1911 which is considered to be by some as close to the perfect auto. (Your mileage may vary) I have never own a Colt myself but I'd sure like to get my hands on nice early Python in good condition. It is one beautiful revolver in my eyes.

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    JONSCH's Avatar
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    THE gun to own nowadays is actually Heckler & Koch pieces. This is the new muscle at the range

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    DevilsJohnson is offline Senior Member
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    Colt has some really nice guns. Take a look at a few and I think you will answer your own question

    I've only owned one and it was a Commander. It's a really good gun.

  5. #5
    tony pasley's Avatar
    tony pasley is offline Senior Member
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    To own the orginals, the pieces of history that has with stood the test of time. The feel of a steel frame in your hand it is just right. I own 9 different Colts.

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    submoa is offline Member
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    Silly question coming from a tag like Glockamania. Basically asking people who already like Colts why they like them.

    Colt Series 80s are avoided by many serious 1911 collectors. Even then only Colts to buy are pre-1986 (revolvers, semis and ARs).

    Beginning in 1986 with the 4 year UAW strike at Colt, quality has been inconsistent. In fact, the poor quality products produced by replacement workers resulted in the US military shifting new M-16 contracts to FN in 1988.

    Colt's financial difficulties resulted in Chapter 11 in 1992.

    In 1994, the assets of Colt were purchased by Zilkha & Co, a financial group owned by Donald Zilkha. It was speculated that Zilkha's financial backing of the company enabled Colt to begin winning back military contracts. In fact during the time period it won only one contract, the M4 Carbine

    During a 1998 Washington Post interview, CEO Ron Stewart stated that he would favor a federal permit system with training and testing for gun ownership. This led to a massive grass-roots boycott of Colt's products by gun stores and ordinary gun owners, some of whom sold their Colt firearms to cut into Colt's market share even more. This ultimately led to the resignation of Ron Stewart.

    Colt Manufacturing Co. announced the termination of its production of double action revolvers in October 1999

    Zilkha replaced Stewart with Steven Sliwa and focused the remainder of Colt's handgun design efforts into "smart guns", a concept which was favored politically but had little interest or support among handgun owners or Police Departments. This research never produced any meaningful results due to the limited technology at the time.

    The boycott of Colt has faded out with the new CEO William M. Keys, a retired U.S. Marine Lt. General, working hard to bring Colt back from its tarnished reputation. Due to the efforts of William Keys, Colt's quality has improved as much as its favor with die hard Colt fans.

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    Wyatt's Avatar
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    Colt still does not manufacture double action revolvers, producing only the various 1911 permutations and some single action revolvers. Certainly some of the old double action revolvers such as the Python are legendary and highly sought after. Other companies produce the Browning 1911 design as well or better than Colt.

    So I don't think Colt is considered THE one and only gun to own as far as semi-autos go. It seems to me Colt snobbery is reserved more for the old DA revolvers. While guns like the Python are indeed a work of functional art, I can't help but think the elevation to mystique status has, in small measure, something to do with the dead rock star syndrome. Once gone they are looked back on as greater than ever, with even more status than when they were alive.

    Having said that, I wish I had a Python.
    AjayTaylor likes this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by submoa View Post
    Silly question coming from a tag like Glockamania. Basically asking people who already like Colts why they like them.
    I'm an open minded type of guy.

    So what I'm hearing...getting your hands on a Colt is owning a piece of history.

  9. #9
    Mike Barham's Avatar
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    Older Colts are nice, but don't do anything better (in a practical sense) than any other 1911 or any other equivalent revolver. I have an old Commander that I carried for years, but now it just sits in my safe except maybe once a year on Memorial Day when I shoot it and my Garand. It was a gift from my father, and so I'll keep it for that reason, but my Glocks are more practical defense guns.

    I am a purely practical guy, though, and don't get emotionally invested in my tools. A true gun hobbyist likely feels differently.
    Last edited by Mike Barham; 09-29-2008 at 11:07 AM.
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    I own a few guns that never get shot, they are mainly historical in nature. There's just something about holding something old and wondering where it's been, what it's seen (if it could see).

    On the other hand, I have some pistols that are work horses. They get shot all the time and are for a specific purpose. They are defense guns.

    I doubt that I'd shoot my older guns, I just like to clean them, and remember the stories I've been told about that particular piece and ponder about the things that could have been. Not very practical, but very good for the imagination. Plus it gives me a connection to my Grandfather, who's long gone, that's probably the best reason to own a piece of history.

    On the other hand, I don't see the reason to buy a Colt AR-15 over a Bushmaster or other brand. They basically cost more for very VERY little benefit.


    Zhur

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    hideit's Avatar
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    As a member of the Colt Collectors Association:
    My first show that I attended it was clear that the DA and SA revolvers are where it is at for collections - these guns appreciate
    they do not depreciate
    Many colts bought are never shot these days.
    If you are buying a colt today - try to get a pre 1986 manufacturerd date

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glockamania® View Post
    Why are Colts (specifically revolvers and semi-automatics) THE gun to own?

    Please educated a tupper ware shooter. Thanks!
    70 series Colt 1911's are like fine ladies, you don't "own" them, just take them out and caress them. They are special.
    So too, are the early Pythons and Cobra's.

  13. #13
    Bob Wright's Avatar
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    In a word: History.

    Colt not only perfected the revolver (at the time) but saw to it that it was a quality piece of workmanship. Add to that the personality of Sam Colt in all his showmanship, and that gets sort of rolled into the gun from the factory.

    Bob Wright

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    revolvers&w is offline Junior Member
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    No mention of the Trooper MK 3 does anybody know how they compare to the Pythons with regards to overall quality?

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    Bob Wright's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by revolvers&w View Post
    No mention of the Trooper MK 3 does anybody know how they compare to the Pythons with regards to overall quality?

    There is really no comparison between the Trooper and the Python. The Python was a hand fitted gun, very closely monitored during the manufacturing process, and special care given to finish.

    The Trooper was a service gun from the git-go, with the usual short cuts of manufacture.

    The Python is capable of extreme hair-splitting accuracy. But, in your hands, with all due respect to your ability, I doubt you could discern the difference in accuracy. Or service.

    I have had Pythons, and they were great guns, but my own preference for the DA .357 Magnum has been toward the Smith & Wesson Model 585 Distinguished Combat Magnum. In my hands, I can't tell any difference in accuracy, and the Smith can handle my heaviest handloads with ease.

    You want a Rembrandt, get the Python. You want a small bore hunting gun, go with a Trooper.

    Bob Wright

  16. #16
    Baldy's Avatar
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    I have both the Trooper MK III and the Python. Just like Bob said they are two different revolvers. The Trooper was a service pistol made for the police market. Here in Florida a lot of HP men carried the 4" model for years.


    The hand fitted Python was made for the target shooter with fine jeweled trigger and special sites. The last ones made left the Colt custom shop in 2004, and they were by special order only.

  17. #17
    Teuthis is offline Member
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    There is no THE GUN that must be owned. Colt 1911's are still quite good, but now so are a number of others. Some of the others may be better.

    Colt no longer makes the revolvers that people seem to want. They were excellent, but they are gone now. In a revolver, I would say that Ruger is THE GUN if there would be one.

    As to the semi-autos, everyone seems to have a favorite but they all do the same thing. The differences in are mostly in peoples' minds. In practical application any quality-manufactured pistol works.

  18. #18
    alloy is offline Junior Member
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    i have never owned a colt. i love antiques and the mystique inherent in older designs and things historical, from my motorcycles to rolexs, to gawking at old airplanes, i dont know why. never owned a 45 either....

    until recently.

    if this said anything other than colt on the side of it, it wouldnt be the same. it isnt technologically advanced, no tricked out super 1911, it is probobly is overweight and under capacity for a modern gun. not the primo year to own...it isnt the best looking, but it is just Colt .45. the single actions from the sunday morning movies have the same subliminal effect they are american historical culture like john deere and john wayne. i try not to overthink it.


  19. #19
    Jump Boot is offline Junior Member
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    It is simple for me. Although I own a number of pistols such as Glock,XD,M&P and they are very fine pistols indeed,but they just aren't Colts. Now I don't mean that in a rude manner. That is just the way I feel about the Colt 1911's ,probably because I carried one in the Nam.From there,the love began.I've shot a number of colt 1911's in bullseye compitition and I will say this much,it took a long time to master the pistol for accuracy,but once mastered,they are hard to beat.One of the most accurate 1911's that I own is a NRM Series 70,unmodified and it shoots right with my Les Baer PII (1-1/2") model.I love it !

  20. #20
    TexasFats is offline Junior Member
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    In all of this talk about the great guns that Colt has produced, you seem to have left out one of the very best. To me, the Colt Second Series Woodsman (made from 1947 until about 1955 or so) with the magazine release next to the trigger guard al la 1911 is the definitive .22 rimfire pistol. I have shot Rugers (both the Single-Six and the Mark II) and own two Buckmarks, but none of them are as good as my 1948 Woodsman. Of course, the fact that it was made the same year as I was born just adds to the appeal. Also, no handgun points better for me than that little gun.

    About the only other gun that was even close to the Woodsman for fun was the S&W K-22--another fine piece.

    By the way, for what it is worth, my favorite pistols are all tied to John Browning in some way: The Woodsman (a Browning design), the 1911 (another work of art by JMB), and the Browning High Power (John M. Browning was working on that design when he died at his desk at FN in Liege, Belgium). Every one of them is quite ergonomic for me. John Browning may not have ever heard the word ergonomics, but he knew how to make his designs ergonomic just the same.

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