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Thread: browning 1910

  1. #1
    jer22 is offline Junior Member
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    browning 1910

    trying to figure out what round to use in my 1910. i know it's a 9 mil para but also read i can run 380 through it. the 380 round jams but haven't seen para available. any advice?

  2. #2
    sgms is offline Member
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    If it is a Browning model 1910 made by F.N. they as far as I understand were never made in 9m/m parabellum. The were made in 9x17 m/m (.380 A.C.P.) and 7.65x17 m/m (.32 A.C.P.) If .380's are jamming I think you need to check the info. on the pistol and see if it isn't a 7.65 or .32 A.C.P. One other thing , .380 and 9m/m parabellum are not interchangable. In the 9 m/m family you will most commonly find the 9x17 (.380), 9x18 (Mak.), 9x19(also called luger, nato, and parabellum) and the 9x21. Each is a different caliber and do not play well with others.

  3. #3
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jer22 View Post
    trying to figure out what round to use in my 1910. i know it's a 9 mil para but also read i can run 380 through it. the 380 round jams but haven't seen para available. any advice?
    Please explain what you mean by "jams." Explain as completely as possible.
    Could you possibly post a picture or two of the jam you're experiencing?
    About the ammunition you're using: What, exactly, does the box say (caliber, bullet weight, muzzle velocity, manufacturer)?
    In what condition is the pistol? How 'bout the magazine?
    Do you have a lot of handgun-shooting experience? Sometimes that makes a difference.
    Please let us know as much as you can.

  4. #4
    jer22 is offline Junior Member
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    new info

    after some research it looks like what i thought was a 1910 was actually a model 1955 manufactured/imported/assembled around 1968.hard to tell due to so many variations on all the european military models. all the research says it's a 380 but the barrel is clearly stamped cal 9m/m00. with some odd markings . i have no pics of the jams, and the gun is in fair shape, definately not showroom. the slide is marked browning not fn. the magazine seeems to be in good working order. i was trying to shoot federal 380 ap, 95 grain, metal case. it didn't jam all the time. just annoying when it did. haven't shot it in at least 9 mths for fear of real malfunction. sorry for the mistake on the original post. jer

  5. #5
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    OK, once again, what kind of jams?
    Failures to eject?
    Failures to feed?
    Stovepipes?

    The .380 is a 9mm. If it had been made in Europe, it would be marked something like "9mmK" or "9mmC."

  6. #6
    jer22 is offline Junior Member
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    1955

    steve, the shell casing hangs in the slide. won't eject every time. jer

  7. #7
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
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    1. Is the gun clean? Crud may be slowing the slide down, or even stopping it short.
    2. Is the ejector broken or bent? If the gun is clean, the ejector is the next likely culprit.
    3. Is there crud under the extractor's hook? This is a far-out possibility.
    4. It is also possible that you are "limp-wristing" the gun as you fire it. This is why I asked about your pistol experience. Semi-auto pistols need to be gripped very firmly. Also you need to apply "follow-through," maintaining that firm grip even after the shot has been fired.

    New pistol shooters tend to "flinch." That is, they react to the recoil impulse of the fired shot even before it has been fired. This can lead to limp-wristing at the moment of discharge.
    The antidote is to carefully maintain a firm grip while slowly pressing the gun's trigger straight back, so that the gun's discharge comes as a complete surprise.

    Tell me whether any of these suggestions have helped cure the problem.

  8. #8
    jer22 is offline Junior Member
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    info

    thanks steve, it could be one or all of what you listed. i do have a barney fife problem with semi-autos. my experience is mostly with revolvers. i'll give it a good cleaning again and try it tomorrow. i think all the mechanical components are ok. i didn't think about it needing the proper recoil to eject. might be just operator error. thanks again. jer

  9. #9
    cedarhill is offline Junior Member
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    I have been fortunate to have purchased a Browning 1910 or 1955 in good clean condition. It came with what I think was original magazine and it shoots great. Purchased two extra magazines off the internet and they both operated great. Sometimes I have a problem putting the slide ring on but I really enjoy it. Sorry you are having problems but it is a great conceal gun.
    J

  10. #10
    dogngun is offline Junior Member
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    When buying an older auto pistol, it's a good idea to replace the recoil spring and other springs as needed. Try Wolff Springs and get the standard weight spring.

    added: Europeans refer to the .380 ACP as the 9mm Short - or Corto or Kurtz, depending on the language. DO NOT fire 9mm Luger/Parabellum ammo in it.

    mark

  11. #11
    cedarhill is offline Junior Member
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    I purchased a Browning 1955 in .380 in good shape. It has never had problems until the last time I took it to the range. When I got back home I noticed the slide ring had come out of place about 1/16th". First I thought I had not put the ring in completely where the slots were in the vertical position. Rather than risk a problem in the future I ordered a new slide ring because the little ears on the original ring seemed to be worn down somewhat. Hopefully the new ring will allow to shoot the gun again without worry of problems. This doesn't mean that I am going to shoot it a lot. The Browning shoots very well with a new magazine I ordered off the internet which is great.
    J

  12. #12
    cedarhill is offline Junior Member
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    One last report on the slide ring as the last time I shot with the Browning it came off at the end of the 2nd clip. Shut down the range for a few minutes and it was not to be found. Glad that a new ring is coming in the mail but I don't know if I will shoot it very often. Hopefully the channel that holds the ring on is not damaged and it will stay on from now on with a new ring.
    J

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