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  1. #1
    ringingears is offline Junior Member
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    Browning Hi-Power

    Quetion. I just purchased a Browning hi Power Practical .40 (hard to find handgun) Haven't fired it yet. Anything you can offer on what to expect on recoil? I'm expecting a not so smooth upward kick. Hope I'm wrong.
    Anything else ya might clue me in on would be nice.
    Have good one.

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  3. #2
    MLB's Avatar
    MLB
    MLB is offline Supporting Member
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    Well, mine's 9mm and relatively tame. I'd expect the .40 to be a bit sharper, but since it's a steel framed handgun, not nearly as stout as a polymer handgun. ( my .40 cal P99 is a bit snappy.) It's no cannon. You'll do fine.

  4. #3
    oldscot3's Avatar
    oldscot3 is offline Junior Member
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    I have a 40 cal. hi-power, it's a pussy cat. I always use it when I re-up my concealed carry license. It's very accurate and it loves the really light weight bullets (135s). Be wary of the safety though, once they break in they are relatively easy to inadvertantly disengage, and as you know, thats all there is... no grip safety, no trigger device, etc.

  5. #4
    the.batman is offline Junior Member
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    From what I've heard, the .40s have a pretty heavy hammer spring to dampen the recoil-

  6. #5
    bhpfan is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by the.batman View Post
    From what I've heard, the .40s have a pretty heavy hammer spring to dampen the recoil-
    Hammer spring or recoil spring?

    I think you may be referring to the recoil spring as it is a little longer and heavier than the one in the 9's.

  7. #6
    yeti's Avatar
    yeti is offline Junior Member
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    I think he means recoil spring.

    The heft of the all steel HP will make the .40 recoil easily managable.

  8. #7
    larryh1108's Avatar
    larryh1108 is offline Junior Member
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    He could mean the hammer spring. They are heavy to slow the slide down the slide when it recocks the hammer. The heavier spring slows the slide down with resistance. I don't know if it makes for less recoil (the energy goes into the frame as opposed to being used by the slide action) but it keeps the frame from being battered. I've read that those who put in weaker hammer springs to make racking easier open the frame to more battering during recoil.

  9. #8
    RePete is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by larryh1108 View Post
    He could mean the hammer spring. They are heavy to slow the slide down the slide when it recocks the hammer. The heavier spring slows the slide down with resistance. I don't know if it makes for less recoil (the energy goes into the frame as opposed to being used by the slide action) but it keeps the frame from being battered. I've read that those who put in weaker hammer springs to make racking easier open the frame to more battering during recoil.
    The recoil spring for the 40S&W is 20lbs vs thw 17lb spring in the 9mm.

    The hammer spring is 32lbs fof both calibers.

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