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  1. #1
    LSP972 is offline Junior Member
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    Several 92FS questions...

    Scored one of these today for my grandson.

    1. It came with two military issue Checkmate magazines in addition to the two Beretta factory magazines. The Checkmates worked fine. I assume they will continue to do so, absent any sand?

    2. This appears to be a brand new pistol (previous owner claimed less than 200 rounds through it), and has a plastic trigger and guide rod. Should I really think about replacing these parts with metal ones? The gun will be shot, but not heavily. It is strictly for getting him acclimated to the DA/SA transition and decocking movement. He probably won't even be trained on it, much less issued one. But I want him to be familiar with it, because you just never know.

    Anyway, I have no problem with procuring metal parts. OTOH, I have no problem with the plastic ones if they do not have a history of early failure. I simply do not "know" this system; Berettas are not exactly common in my former profession.

    3. Is the admonition against dry firing (in the manual) legitimate, or just another manufacturer CYA attempt? The firing pin is a normal, spring-loaded inertia type...unless the FPB is in the way, etc., I don't see what dry firing could hurt.

    Man... this sucker has a lot of nooks and crannies. Its as a big of a PITA to clean as a P7.

    Any insight to the above questions greatly appreciated.

    .

    .

  2. #2
    VAMarine's Avatar
    VAMarine is online now Administrator
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    I wouldn't worry about replacing any parts. The Military dry fires the heck out of their weapons, including the M9, if you want to be extra cautious, get some snap caps. Cleaning is a snap, much easier than the P7. No gas tube and no little pieces under the grip panels.

  3. #3
    ponzer04's Avatar
    ponzer04 is online now Member
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    I second the military dry firing the heck out of weapons

  4. #4
    loper is offline Junior Member
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    CMI mags are OK, except for sandy places.
    Don't worry about the plastic parts, every M9 I've ever taken apart had a plastic guide rod, and I've never seen any trouble with them.
    We dry-fire the wheels off of everything, and I've never seen a broken M9 firing pin.
    Cleaning is pretty easy, be sure you lube the locking block.
    The 92/M9 is a fun piece, enjoy!

  5. #5
    LSP972 is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for the replies. So I guess I'll leave it alone and just let the boy shoot it to his heart's content, plus dry-fire it.

    .

  6. #6
    Shipwreck's Avatar
    Shipwreck is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    CDNN sells factor mags for like $18. I personally never use any mags but MDS (they make factory mags), factory mags or Mecgar mags...

  7. #7
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    I've known the owners of Checkmate Industries for over 30 years. They are wrongly blamed for the problems with their magazines. The military asked them to find a way to reduce the cost of the magazines. They replied by offering a lower cost black finish. They submitted samples for approval. The military approved the samples and the magazines were then produced to the new specifications.

    As it turned out, the new finish attracted sand and created problems. The government then reverted to the older specs. At no time did Checkmate ship any magazines that were not to the then current spec. None were rejected for quality issues. The quality of the magazines were never at issue. The sole issue was the appropriateness fo the new finish.

    Sand can cause horrific damage to machinery. I used to work in a camera shop. If a customer came in with a camera that was dropped on the beach and was not working we told them to simply throw it away. The cost to repair would be more than even the most expensive cameras were worth (film cameras).

    So the sand in the magazines created problems because the new finish allowed the sand to cling to the surface. The mechanical aspects of the magazines were always fine. So keep them clean and you should do well.

  8. #8
    Shipwreck's Avatar
    Shipwreck is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Yes, I remember you have talked about checkmate mags before - an we have discussed this.

    Me personally - since so many places have factory mags for under $20 - and not the $40+ that some gun stores still wanna charge. I'd rather just pay another couple of bucks and get the factory mag.

  9. #9
    Packard is offline Senior Member
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    I'm not telling anyone to go out and buy Checkmate magazines; I'm just saying that they supplied the parts as the military specified them and Checkmate was the one that ended up with mud on their faces.

  10. #10
    loper is offline Junior Member
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    Well, this is sort of off-topic, but I'm not anti- checkmate mags, I run a bunch of them with my M1A. They had a sand problem with the M9 mags, due to the finish, so I made the comment "O.K., except for sandy places".
    As a company, I'm sure they're fine, they just got tangled up in changing spec's from Uncle Sam.
    Looks like LSP972 got his questions answered, though.

  11. #11
    LSP972 is offline Junior Member
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    Indeed I did.

    While I haven't seen any "verified" troublesome magazines, and therefore am not sure what the villainous finish looks like, these two I have appear to be something other than normal phosphate/parkerizing as I know it. And they are smooth... not the rough texture I've read about. They work just fine. They do have a FSN, though.

    .

  12. #12
    LSP972 is offline Junior Member
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    Just thought I'd let you guys know about our "progress".

    I have never had much (if any at all) interest in these pistols. We had a couple of them submitted back in 1987 when we were deciding what 9mm service pistol to transition to. The Sig P226 caught our eye. I kinda/sorta liked the 92 Compact, but quickly forgot about it in the press of transition business.

    This year, a dear friend's daughter joined the Marines, and will be an MP. She has very little shooting experience and was more or less afraid of the service pistol. I borrowed a 92F from a pal and gave her a brief overview. Then, #1 grandson tells me HE is going into the Marines. So I bought the one described above. Both of them have shot the hell out of it the past ten days (she's home on leave, goes to her service school in February; he's out of school for the holidays).

    Of interest here is the fact that we're up to over 700 rounds through the pistol, with no cleaning or added lubrication. It began clean and lubed. About half of the ammunition has been factory ball- economy Remington and WWB from Wally World- and the other half has been my reloads... most of which were loaded with 124 cast RNL "Green Bullets" from BayouBullets. The proprietary coating on these makes them a lot less 'dirty' than normal cast bullets, but they still are lead and not jacketed or plated.

    The point of all this is, we have experienced no malfunctions; none. While my grandson has been shooting Glocks and HKs for years, these are his first forays with a Beretta. The girl is new to shooting a handgun, period. I was fully expecting a few shooter-induced malfs. Nope.

    The boy and I are going back to the range today; another 200 rounds at least. I plan to keep shooting it until it begins to choke, just to see how far it will go.

    I shot it bit... the experience brought back memories of wrestling with the DA/SA transition on those Sigs. That was a big obstacle to overcome, training guys who had been shooting DA revolvers for so many years. The Beretta 92 is a very easy gun to shoot; but it won't get shot unless my grandson is around. It will be his when he gets to that point in his life (out on his own) and he can "have" a pistol. While I sorta like the gun, I prefer to concentrate on the superb LEM trigger my HKs have.

    .

  13. #13
    Shipwreck's Avatar
    Shipwreck is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Very cool. Realize that the 92 likes a lot of lube. You really should clean it at this point, just so you. Don't get a headache at the range...

  14. #14
    berettatoter's Avatar
    berettatoter is offline Senior Member
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    You can't beat the 92F. Great looks, good caliber(with the right bullet), and tough as nails.

  15. #15
    LSP972 is offline Junior Member
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    In case anyone is interested... we got the round count up to just over a thousand. No malfunctions, all without cleaning or additional lubrication. Then the girl went back to the marines and my grandson went back to school.

    I cleaned the pistol thoroughly, lubed it well, and put it up... where it sits today. No sense in me shooting it, as I cannot even begin to see those small sights clearly. My astigmatism has gotten so bad, I'm getting ready to transition completely to red dot sighted pistols.

    But 1K rounds with no cleaning and no malfunctions, almost all fired by novice shooters, is pretty darn impressive.

    .

  16. #16
    Shipwreck's Avatar
    Shipwreck is offline HGF Forum Moderator
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    Glad to hear it

  17. #17
    berettabone is offline Banned
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    That's why I feel that the 92-96 is the best handgun out there.......

  18. #18
    rhodco's Avatar
    rhodco is offline Junior Member
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    I'm just curious about the comment regarding plastic guide rods in the 92FS. My 92FS is all steel. No plastic anywhere except the grip panels. It was made in the mid 90's so I'm wondering if this is something that was changed recently?

  19. #19
    AsteroidBlues is offline Junior Member
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    Yes, I believe I heard the wise Shipwreck say that Beretta transitioned to the polymer guide rods somewhere around 2002-2003. They work better in sandbox regions thanks to the flutes in the rod.

  20. #20
    rhodco's Avatar
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    Concerning the original OP's question on how much of a PITA it is to clean... I usually just field strip, remove the grip panels, and push out the pins holding the lanyard loop, and the slide stop pin. This allows the mainspring, hammer, and whatever you call that bar running through the mainspring, to drop free. Then, I spray non-chlorinated brake cleaner all around the rest of the frame parts. There is enough room to push a cotton patch down through the space where the hammer goes and out the bottom through the hole left by the lanyard loop. Let it dry while you spray the slide good. If you press the nozzle up against the firing pin hole and spray, you should see it coming out the back of the extractor. That's all I usually do with the slide because taking it down further is time consuming, not very hard, just takes a while to tap out all the pins and put them back again. (I did it once and it took me about 4 hours because I did a very thorough job not wanting to do that again). There is really no reason why you should have to take the slide apart to clean, only if there is a problem that needs to be fixed. I did it out of curiosity and once was enough for me.

    Let the slide dry out and clean the barrel good. Don't forget to lubricate the locking block assy real good. I like mine slick. Lubricate the hammer before you re-install it and drop some oil down on the trigger spring. Once you put it all back together, work the action back and forth and dry fire a few times. This will bring excess oil out of the nooks and crannies for you to wipe off. After a couple of days I usually field strip it again, quickly wipe off more excess oil, and put it back together.

    It's not really a PITA, more like a labor of love.

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