Stove pipes in my 92F

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    1. #1
      Junior Member handgun_newbie's Avatar
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      Stove pipes in my 92F

      I finally got my new Beretta 92F (the U.S. Marines Limited edition with the red grips I'm getting used to) out to a local range. Although my only prior handgun experience was with a M1911A1 many years ago (courtesy of the U.S. Army), I never had stove pipes with that weapon like I'm having with the Beretta. I figure it must be the ammo I'm using....Sellier & Bellot 9mm 115gr FMJ. Is this ammo known for that or perhaps what I needed to get was 124g? Maybe Uncle Sam just uses better quality ammo. Of course, he had/has deeper pockets than I do. Fyi, I shot around 50 rounds and had 3 stove pipes. Hopefully I'm using the right term, i.e. the shell casing ejected after firing gets hung up in the ejection port. Is there any ammo you'd especially recommend for the 92F based on your experience?


      Edited to add: The Beretta also comes with extra grips (black). Exactly what size/type tool is used to unscrew the two fasteners holding the grips? It looks like it would be an Allen wrench but most of you probably know exactly what's needed.

    2. #2
      Member Dynamik1's Avatar
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      Not sure about the grip removal - interested to hear that response too - but I have NEVER had a stovepipe, FTF or FTE on my Beretta with about 2500 rnds. I typically use Remington White Box from the range for range ammo and Federal Personal Defense 135gr Hydrashok JHP for daily carry.

    3. #3
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      Strange to hear about this happening with a 92. I would definately try a different type of ammo and see if the problem persists. I have never had the opportunity to use S&B ammo in my handguns but I can comment that my Bushmaster AR15 doesn't like it at all but has fed without fail everything else I have tried including reloads. My theory is that the S&B powder type or grain count is insufficient in some cases to effectively cycle the slide in your case or the bolt as in my case. Basically not enough poop to fully open the slide and eject the spent casing.

      I am not an expert by any means but that would be my opinion regarding cause and solution. Good plinking ammo such as American Eagle, Winchester White box, UMC or even Blazer in my experience should be problem free and readily available. If the problem persists with other types of ammo I'd have the 92 inspected. Good luck.

    4. #4
      Member buck32's Avatar
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      That does seem odd?

      I have an M9 that has eaten WWB, UMC, Blazer Brass, Winchester JHP, Federal JHP, American Eagle and even some odds and end stuff when I can't find BB or WWB.

      I probably have 2500 to 3000 rounds through it now and think I have had one FTE.

      Definitely try different ammo as it should eat anything without a hiccup.

    5. #5
      Junior Member Naterstein's Avatar
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      The stovepipes are a concerned... not sure if I have ever heard of that with the open slide of a Beretta.

      As for the grip screws, IIRC, I think its a 2mm Allen. I just buy both the $1 metric and english Allen wrench stacks at Wally World.

    6. #6
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      DJ Niner's Avatar
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      I've seen a couple of 92Fs that would stovepipe when they were clean but bone dry. Add a drop or two of light oil or CLP on the slide rails, then work the slide back and forth manually to distribute the lube. If you still have problems, then try a couple different types of ammo. But I'd bet it's a lack-of-lube problem.

    7. #7
      Junior Member handgun_newbie's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by DJ Niner View Post
      I've seen a couple of 92Fs that would stovepipe when they were clean but bone dry. Add a drop or two of light oil or CLP on the slide rails, then work the slide back and forth manually to distribute the lube. If you still have problems, then try a couple different types of ammo. But I'd bet it's a lack-of-lube problem.

      Thanks for that tip. I don't know if that's typical of brand new 92Fs or not, but it wouldn't surprise me. Maybe the factory (in Accokeek, MD, I believe)
      doesn't lube enough as a cost-saving measure or for some reason relating to shipping/storage. Although once I run through the S&B, I'll try another brand ammo just for comparison.

    8. #8
      Member Spartan's Avatar
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      Hmm, interesting. My personal 92FS is 4,500 rounds in and never a failure. I even went 1,200 rounds and 6 + months rounds without cleaning it at all at one point.

      I've actually heard good things about S&B ammo and just bought some, but have never used it. Maybe I will take it next time and see what happens...

    9. #9
      Senior Member zhurdan's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by handgun_newbie View Post
      Thanks for that tip. I don't know if that's typical of brand new 92Fs or not, but it wouldn't surprise me. Maybe the factory (in Accokeek, MD, I believe)
      doesn't lube enough as a cost-saving measure or for some reason relating to shipping/storage. Although once I run through the S&B, I'll try another brand ammo just for comparison.
      You did clean it before shooting it right? The problem with buying factory new guns and not cleaning and lubing them is that they sit in a box for who knows how long gathering bits of dust in the lubricant and if you don't clean then before shooting them for the first time, it's like trying to drag a chain link fence thru a mud hole.

      Clean it, lube it, try again.

      Zhur

    10. #10
      Junior Member TcRoc's Avatar
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      Rare you hear of this with a 92,,indeed put a little oil on the slide rails and try differant ammo

    11. #11
      Member Scratchshooter40's Avatar
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      92fs

      I have two 96's and a 92FS. I have never experienced any type of malfunction in any of them. Yes, always clean and lube the weapon when you first get it. Re info above. Try Machinegunner's Lube available from Sprinco on-line it stays where you put it and does a great job. Use a 1/5mm t-handle allen wrench to remove grip screws to put black grips on the USMC model. If you have an older holdover grip set make sure to look after the star washers under the screws. They are only on my 92FS, not on my 96 Bruniton or Inox. As to ammo, I generally use Winchester White Box or Remington UMC, they both shoot clean. If I carry the 92 I use Speer Gold Dot +P 124 gr JHP.

    12. #12
      Junior Member Centerfired9mm's Avatar
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      I have about 2000 rounds through my 92 without a failure. It is pretty strange that you would get a stovepipe on the open slide design. I shoot WWB, Remington, and lots of LRN reloads. No problems. I am pretty sure it would shoot gravel of you can get it chambered. I agree with the consensus, clean, lube, and try it again. If you still get them switch ammo, it may just be a little finicky until it's broken in.

    13. #13
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      Sellier & Bellot is east European made. It's loaded a little hotter than many other brands. You might check your grip. Limp wristing can cause a gun to not cycle correctly. Make sure the gun is clean and well lubed. Other than that maybe the recoil spring. Of course check out other ammo. Some guns just don't like some ammo.

    14. #14
      Junior Member handgun_newbie's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by zhurdan View Post
      You did clean it before shooting it right? The problem with buying factory new guns and not cleaning and lubing them is that they sit in a box for who knows how long gathering bits of dust in the lubricant and if you don't clean then before shooting them for the first time, it's like trying to drag a chain link fence thru a mud hole. Clean it, lube it, try again. Zhur

      Actually I didn't clean it before shooting and the manual didn't even mention that. I guess I assumed (perhaps incorrectly) that it wasn't necessary. But I will make sure it's well cleaned/lubed before I try again. I'll probably buy a box of another brand of ammo to see if that makes the difference. Thanks to all of you for all the useful info.

    15. #15
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      Any gun new or used should be taken down and cleaned before first use. If for no other reason that you can see if there is anything wrong in there. You are going to be spitting out little projectiles out of it at a pretty good speed. I know I want to make sure there's no little metal shavings or whatnot in there to make that more difficult.

      You don't buy a car without looking under the hood and maybe kicking a tire. Sure don't want to take something that don't need a whole lot to go wrong to make things get really bad really fast and fist fire it off without checking out what's inside.

    16. #16
      ZZ
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      Quote Originally Posted by DJ Niner View Post
      I've seen a couple of 92Fs that would stovepipe when they were clean but bone dry. Add a drop or two of light oil or CLP on the slide rails, then work the slide back and forth manually to distribute the lube. If you still have problems, then try a couple different types of ammo. But I'd bet it's a lack-of-lube problem.
      Ditto to the above. Mine did the same thing because I did not lube before shooting it the first time (years ago) and it stove-piped like crazy with good Winchester Silver Tips.

    17. #17
      Member rccola712's Avatar
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      based on the responses, im going to guess its a lube issue, but could you possibly be limpwristing it? it sounds like you have decent at the bare minimum experience, but just thought i'd throw it out there.

    18. #18
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      I have spent lots of time with fellow Marines shooting M9's. I have seen lots of malfunctions. However I can't remember seeing a malfunction that wasn't shooter induced. Limp-risting was a rare cause. The number one cause was a dry weapon. Little squirt of lube and the problems went away. A brand new, dry weapon will almost certainly have issues. Hopefully that's all it was. Good luck.

    19. #19
      Junior Member B Brazier's Avatar
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      As DJ said always clean and lube a new gun, my M9 and 92FS never had a stovepipe with any ammo, and as most have pinted out I dont think its an ammo problem, either limpwristing or had to do with not cleaning and oiling it before shooting

    20. #20
      Member DanP_from_AZ's Avatar
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      This is another one of those "92's need to be properly lubed" posts.

      I bought my 92 in 1992. Cleaned and lubed it first. NEVER had a problem with any ammo,
      including "dubious cheap reloads" from friends. Thousands of rounds, never a failure.
      It's never been my CCW gun. Long ago I took it hiking and camping as "predator poison".

      Then, a couple of years ago, it was replaced for "first-line night-stand duty" by a Mossberg 500 eight-shot with 00 buck.
      And, instead of a monthly cleaning and lube, and target-shooting 3-4 times a year, the 92 was put away in the night-stand drawer and ignored.

      A couple of months ago, I took it along target-shooting since my girlfriend had never shot a semi-auto handgun.
      She had several ramp-feed failures. Not stove-piping.

      I accused her of limp-wristing. "Give me that thing, I'll show you how to shoot it".
      Just like her, I got about 3 out of 10 feed-ramp failures.

      Took it home, cleaned it until totally dry, and lubed it properly. And tried it out again.
      Just like before, it eats every spare bit of odd-ball 9mm I have hanging around. No problems.

      In other words, not limp-wristing, not ammo, just another form of "operator error".

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