View Poll Results: What kind of work do you do on your 1911?

Voters
134. You may not vote on this poll
  • Grip changes

    123 91.79%
  • Detail clean and strip

    117 87.31%
  • Spring replacement

    109 81.34%
  • Trigger replacement

    71 52.99%
  • Sear/hammer replacement

    62 46.27%
  • Barrel swap

    53 39.55%
  • Thumb safety replacement

    71 52.99%
  • Grip safety replacement

    65 48.51%
  • Sight replacement

    62 46.27%
  • Dehorning or melding

    27 20.15%
  • Full on custom work

    16 11.94%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 57
  1. #21
    wetidlerjr's Avatar
    wetidlerjr is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    61
    I haven't done a full detail strip but I have replaced a sear spring. I really need to learn to detail strip.

  2. #22
    Clyde's Avatar
    Clyde is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    169
    Any straight replacement - nothing that requires fitting (Figure it is cheap if I pay a real Gunsmith) Typically a detail strip 2 - 3 times a year depending on how much use the firearm gets to burn powder.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    219
    One of my goals for 07 is to learn how to detail strip a 1911. I can do it with Glocks but I think Glocks are probably the easiest guns to disassemble. I'm going to have my gunsmith back in Iowa give me a lesson.

  4. #24
    marcodelat's Avatar
    marcodelat is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by wetidlerjr View Post
    I haven't done a full detail strip but I have replaced a sear spring. I really need to learn to detail strip.
    Here's something to get you started

    http://www.freepatriot.com/removeseries80.php

    http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/tech/theory_op.htm

  5. #25
    bompa is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Western Mass
    Posts
    86
    Guess I have done or tried to do just about everything that didn't need a machine shop to do..There is a lot of satisfaction in doing things for your self that work out well..
    Lack of a local smith is another reason to do things yourself..

  6. #26
    berkbw is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5

    Who works on their 1911's POLL

    I think that I have done about everything that can be done by hand in building .45s for myself only. O/S barrels, slides, frames, safeties..... most everything. There are not many things that I would nornally do but hammer on a 1911.

    Long barrel, 5", .460R, combat. I can't wait to start the next projects. I wish that I could build some in the 4 1/2 - 3" size, but the small size makes them really hard to balance.


    b-

  7. #27
    mvslay is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    94
    I've done a tiny amount on my Kimber. It had a problem with 230gr ball ammo(Crazy I know). Most of my hobby 'smithing has been with rifles. I was fortunate enough to get some machine tool experience in the Army. And later on in tech school I got even more. I've been itching to get a 1911 build going. To be honest though I don't even know where to start.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    capitol city
    Posts
    447

    Wink

    i will do all the work i can on mine when i get one.that will be this weekend....yea!!!

  9. #29
    DevilsJohnson is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    3,373

    Thumbs up

    I've done most all the work to all my guns.

  10. #30
    TerryP Guest
    I'll shoot it, field strip and clean, and have changed my grips. I was a beancounter for over 30 years and my brother-in-law is a half decent gun smith so I do his taxes and he takes care of my guns.

  11. #31
    hideit's Avatar
    hideit is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    west chester ohio
    Posts
    1,498
    as long as it has a bevertail i don't touch it

  12. #32
    Bob Wright's Avatar
    Bob Wright is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    1,546
    Not currently owning an auto loader, I couldn't very well take the poll.

    BUT, when I did have my Gold Cup, I replaced its straight mainspeing housinf with an arched one. Also changed out the grips for walnut ones. And installed a new hardball recoil spring.

    At one time I was in charge of twenty four M1911s, and switched parts around on those for the pistol team. This included tighter barrel bushings, smoother triggers, etc. I was not allowed to use non-GI parts, so had to try fit parts that I had on hand. This while in the U.S. Army.

    I had enough sense to see to it that the company commander's pistol was the best looking.

    Bob Wright

  13. #33
    PanaDP's Avatar
    PanaDP is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Hollywood
    Posts
    406
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Wright View Post
    I had enough sense to see to it that the company commander's pistol was the best looking.
    Smart man.

  14. #34
    James NM's Avatar
    James NM is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    1,091
    I charge my owm magazines. Does that count?

  15. #35
    Justice4all is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    5
    Nothing major like a barrel replacement, but hammer, sears, triggers, sights etc... As soon as I can afford a mill/lathe/press I'll take the next step up the smithing ladder. The only real prohibition to what I can currently do is the cost of the proper tools and fixtures. Oh, and I detail strip any/all of my weapons after approx 100 rounds of ammo... I believe I have what the pro's call OCD.

    Normally, since my guns are all mainly for self defense, I'd really rather not have to worry about them as much, but as I currently own and have owned 1911's, I find I don't have much choice. My main CCW is a Kimber Tac Pro that I'll be changing the ejector on this weekend now that I've got the new extractor in and "tuned". Kinda makes me mad that I have to do this for the most expensive weapon I own, but I won't deal with folks that look for excuses not to fix a tool that I may have to rely on for my life. I also strongly believe that it is in every gun owners best interest to have a basic working knowledge of their weapon. A responsibility of sorts.

    On the flip side, I really enjoy working on guns or anything mechanical and am in the process of a major career change as I look for gun smithing schools to attend.

  16. #36
    bophi's Avatar
    bophi is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    23

    gunsmithing

    Quote Originally Posted by 2400 View Post
    How many of you do your own work on your 1911?
    Explain your choices from the poll.

    The poll is multiple choice.
    i do all of the above except full custom work

  17. #37
    hawcer's Avatar
    hawcer is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    178
    I built my own out of a 80% frame and Caspian slide.I learned alot and mainly learned this is not a cost effective route and have purchased 100% ready to shoot ever since!

  18. #38
    Steve M1911A1's Avatar
    Steve M1911A1 is online now Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Northwest Washington State
    Posts
    5,301
    A lot of 1911 work is straightforward and simple.
    Some of it is not.
    I wouldn't touch the feed ramp, for instance, nor the magazine's feed lips.
    Trigger jobs, including stoning the sear-to-hammer contact surfaces, take patience. But really good trigger jobs take talent, which I don't have.

  19. #39
    gmaske's Avatar
    gmaske is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,071
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve M1911A1 View Post
    A lot of 1911 work is straightforward and simple.
    Some of it is not.
    I wouldn't touch the feed ramp, for instance, nor the magazine's feed lips.
    Trigger jobs, including stoning the sear-to-hammer contact surfaces, take patience. But really good trigger jobs take talent, which I don't have.
    Steve speaks for me too.

  20. #40
    ECHOONE is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Fl.
    Posts
    63
    Two reason why I purchased a Mil-Spec one I didn't want to buy a 1911 the way some one else thought it should be made for me,second was I wanted to learn the in and outs of the gun and how to do things for myself, thru the help of the great peoples on different forums I just about customized my entire 1911 all by myself.It's totally reliable I have never had one hiccup or misfeed,I love how it looks and it's very accurate! KUDO"S and thanks to all of the great people that helped me along the way and gave me advise.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

1911 exploded view
,

1911 gunsmith in washington state

,

1911 gunsmith lexington ky?

,

1911 gunsmith washington state

,

1911 gunsmiths in washington state

,
1911 gunsmiths washington state
,
best gunsmith in washington state
,
most used gunsmith for 1911's
,
shock buffs
,
tools for working on 1911 hand gun
,
washington state gunsmiths specialing in 1911's
,
work on 1911's
Click on a term to search for related topics.

» Springfield Armory

» HGF Sponsors

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.2.1